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The 
Canadian 
Rose Annual 

1967 

THEO MAYER 

EDITOR 




Published by 
THE CANADIAN ROSE SOCIETY 
Toronto, Ontario 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/canadianrose1967cana 



Preface 



After eight years of outstanding work by our predecessor, OrviUe E. 
Bowles, the Annual comes to you from a new editor, who hopes that 
you will view this first effort with a sympathetic eye. Any success that 
it may enjoy will be owing entirely to the contributions of writers and 
reporters, whose assistance is gratefully acknowledged. 

We are especially indebted to Mr. Harold C. Cross of Baie d'Urfe 
for The Clearing House and to Mrs. W. A. MacDonald of Winnipeg 
for The Rose Analysis. The time, skill and effort expended on these 
two popular features by Mr. Gross and Mrs. MacDonald deserve 
the applause of us all. 

Again we urge our members to patronize our advertisers, whose 
generous support has done much to make the publication of this year 
book possible. 

All the colour plates in this publication are reproduced by kind 
permission of the Royal National Rose Society of Great Britain, 
whose generosity is warmly acknowledged and appreciated. 

This Annual reaches you during the celebration of the centen- 
nary of Canadian Confederation, and, in our choice of articles, we 
have kept this in mind. Despite the festivities attendant on our cen- 
tennial, all in Canada in 1967 is not sweetness and light. There are 
divisive forces at work, and much understanding and altruistic effort 
will be required if this great nation is to continue prosperous and 
united. From Atlantic to Pacific, the rose is a symbol of beauty and 
fellowship. This wonderful flower knows no barriers of language, race 
or creed, and we, as Canadians and rose lovers, might do well to 
remember this in the difficult years that lie ahead. 

Theo Mayer 



1 



Contents 



Preface — Theo Mayer 1 

Past Presidents 4 

Patrons, Officers, Directors, Committees 7 

Affiliated Societies 11 

A Message from the President 12 

The Annual Meeting 14 

Annual Financial Statement 18 

The Canadian National Rose Show 1966 — Sheila Jupp 19 
Trophies and Prizes Awarded at the Canadian 

National Rose Show 1966 23 

The Book Shelf — "Dogrose" 29 

The Secret and Voluptuous Life of a Rose-Grower — 

Hugh MacLennan 32 

Miniature Roses — Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow 

— Ralph S. Moore 39 

Some All-Canadian Roses — Fred Blakeney 42 

That Wonderful Year 1 867 — Theo Mayer 51 

Rose Culture in Canada at Confederation — 

Harold C. Cross 54 

Induced Mutation in Roses — John Schloen 64 

Glengariff Revisited — Mrs. J. J. Gallagher 66 

Systemic Pesticides and Roses — Beresford J. Watt 73 

The Future of Roses in Canada — R. Simonet 78 

Foliar Feeding in the Culture of Roses — 

Dr. George and Nora Jorgenson 80 

Rose Growing in Prince Edward Island — 

Dr. R. G. Lea 85 

The Nina Marshall Rose — Margaret E. Dove 88 

The Problem of Rose Classification — 

Dr. Griffith J. Buck 90 

2 



Arranging Roses in the Home Garden — Theo Mayer 94 

Roses in Sunny Queensland — Hugh Graham 98 

Progress in Hardy Everblooming Roses — 

Percy H. Wright 102 

The Aphids and Their Control — Orville E. Bowles 105 

Survival — W. Ready 113 

District Reports : 

Vancouver Island — Fred Blakeney 117 

Vancouver — Mrs. Phyllis Walkinshaw 118 

Calgary — Mrs. P. H. Bastin and Miss Helen Scarr 120 

Lethbridge — J. K. Wood 122 

Saskatchewan — Mrs. J. Zary 122 

Manitoba — Mrs. W. A. MacDonald 125 

Lakehead Area — H. C. Westbrook 127 

Windsor — George H. Magee 128 

London — R. G. Whidock 130 

Peterborough — Margaret Heideman 131 

Ottawa — Grace Shewfelt 133 

Montreal District — E. B. Jubien, W. G. Borland 

and H. C. Cross 134 

Quebec City — Louis T. Beaulieu 136 

Northern New Brunswick — L. A. Miller 137 

Northeastern Nova Scotia — Ronald P. Spencer 138 

Nova Scotia South Shore — G. H. Christie 140 

Prince Edward Island — Dr. R. G. Lea 140 

Annapolis Valley — Mrs. O. H. Antoft 141 

The Rose Analysis 143 

The Clearing House 157 

Index to Advertisers 197 

Advertisements 198 



3 



PRESIDENTS 
of 

The Can ad an Rose Society 
and its predecessor 
The Rose Society of Ontario 



1913-14-15 


Mrs. Allen Baines* 


1916-17-18 


Mrs. G. Graeme Adam* 


1919-20 


Mr. Aubrey D. Heward* 


1921 


Dr. A. H. Rolph 


1922-3-4-5 


Miss Helen L. Beardmore* 


1926-7 


Mr. F. Barry Hayes, Sr.* 


1928-9 


Mr. P. H. Mitchell* 


1930-31 


Lieut.-Col. Hugh A. Rose* 


1932-3 


Mr. A. J. Webster 


1934-5 


Mr. P. L. Whytock* 


1936-7 


Mr. A. J. Webster 


1938-9 


Mr. P. L. Whytoek 


1940 


Mr. D. C. Patton 


1941-2 


Mr. A. A. Norton 




Activities Suspended 


1 QA£ 7 


T miit TJ„„L, A T> /^.o/i* 

-Lieut.-L^ol. riugn A. Kose 


1948-9 


Mr. A. J. Webster 


1950-1 


Mr. F. F. Dufton* 


1952-3 


Miss Mabel Stoakley 


1954-5 


Mrs. H. P. Marshall 


1956-7 


Mr. F. F. Dufton* 


1958-9 


Mr. W. J. Keenan 


1960-61 


Mrs. J. H. Baillie 


1962-3 


Mr. Eric Billington 


1964-5 


Lieut. -Col. F. E. Goulding 


1966 


Mr. M. A. Cadsby, Q.C. 


*Deceased 





4 



Col. R. S. McLaughlin, Patron 
Oshawa, Ontario 



The Canadian Rose Society 



Chief Patron: 

HIS EXCELLENCY MAJOR GENERAL GEORGES P. VANIER 



Mr. Ralph P. Bell, o.b.e. 
Dr. A. P. Chan 
Mr. Earl Cox and Mrs. Cox 
Lady Eaton 
Mrs. Ena Harkness 
Dr. R. J. Hilton, b.sc. (agr.) , ph.d. 
Mr. Sam McGredy 
Colonel R. S. McLaughlin 
The Honourable H. de M. Molson, o.b.e. 
Mr. A. A. Norton and Mrs. Norton 
Mr. Harold Rea and Mrs. Rea 
Dr. A. H. Rolph 
Mr. Archie Selwood 
Dr. F. L. Skinner, m.b.e.., l.l.d. 
Miss F. Fyfe Smith 
Mr. Schuyler C. Snively and Mrs. Snively 
The Honourable Mr. Justice C. D. Stewart 
Miss Mabel Stoakley 
Mrs. J. Lockie Wilson 

HONORARY OFFICERS 

Honorary Vice-Presidents 



D.S.O.., M.C, CD. 

Governor General of Canada 



Patrons: 



Mr. E. Billington 



Mrs. J. H. Baillie 



Mr. F. E. Goulding 



Honorary Directors 



Mr. A. E. Brown 
Mr. H. C. Cross 
Mrs. J. J. Gallagher 



Mrs. W. J. Keenan 
Mr. L. Laking 
Mrs. W. A. MacDonald 
Mrs. A. L. Naismith 



Mr. D. C. Patton 
Professor J. C. Taylor 
Mrs. C. T. Wilson 



7 



OFFICERS 



President 
Mr. M. A. Cadsby, Q.C. 



Vice-Presidents 

Mr. O. E. Bowles Mr. W. R. McLaren 

First Vice-President Third Vice-President 

Mr. J. W. Whytock Mr. R. A. Lyle 

Second Vice-President Fourth Vice-President 



Mr. O. E. Bowles 
Mrs. R. M. Brophy 
Mr. L. M. Brown 
Mr. M. A. Cadsby, Q. 
Mr. A. C. Carswell 
Mr. H. G. Cook 
Mrs. M. Ellames 
Treasurer: Mr. A. C. 
Secretary: Mrs. P. A. 



Board of Directors 

Mr. G. S. Flagler 
Mr. F. E. Goulding 
Mrs. S. Jupp 
Mr. R. A. Lyle 
Mrs. H. P. Marshall 
Mr. S. McConnell 
Mr. P. A. McDougall 



Mr. W. R. McLaren 
Mr. J. Schloen 
Mr. C. R. Stephenson 
Mr. V. Taylor 
Mr. R. G. Whitlock 
Mr. J. W. Whytock 
Mr. R. Vezina 
Carswell, 73 Lionel Heights Cres., Don Mills, Ontario 
McDougall, 31 Learmont Drive, Weston, Ontario 



Rose Cultural Advisory Committee 

Mr. S. McConnell, Chairman 
Mr. F. Blakeney, 963 Arundel Drive, Victoria, British Columbia 
Mr. J. H. Eddie, 4100 S.W. Marine Drive, Vancouver 13, British Columbia 
Mr. Archie Selwood, 1450 West 40th Avenue, Vancouver 13, British Columbia 
Mrs. W. A. MacDonald, 174 Baltimore Road, Winnipeg 13, Manitoba 
Mr. D. McConnell, Port Burwell, Ontario 
Mr. A. E. Brown, P.O. Box 181, Islington, Ontario 
Mr. A. A. Norton, 22 Eastview Crescent, Toronto 12, Ontario 
Mr. W. J. Keenan, 107 Courtleigh Boulevard, Toronto 12, Ontario 
Mr. W. H. Perron, 515 Labelle Blvd., L'abord a Plouffe, Montreal 40, Quebec 
Mr. E. B. Jubien, 150 Vivian Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, Montreal 16, 
Quebec 

Mrs. Marie Cox, Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia 

Mr. J. Schloen, R.R. 1, Brooklin, Ontario 

Mr. R. Snazelle, R.R. 5, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island 

Auditors 

Mr. S. B. Bartlett, C.A. Mr. W. J. Keenan, R.I.A. 

Exhibition Committee 
Mr. R. A. Lyle — Chairman 



Vice-Chairmen 

Mr. H. G. Cook, Public Relations Mrs. M. Ellames, Decorative Section 

Mr. J. Schloen, Airborne Exhibits Mr. F. E. Goulding, Specimens 



8 



Committees 



Mrs. J. H. Baillie 
Mr. O. E. Bowles 
Mrs. R. M. Brophy 
Mr.W.M.Earl 
Mr. M. Ellames 



Mrs. R. A. Lyle 
Mr. G. S. Flagler 
Mr. P. A. McDougall 
Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn 
Mrs. T. J. F. Ross 



Mr. R. H. Scott 
Mr. C. E. Stephenson 
Mr. Val Taylor 
Mrs. C. T. Wilson 
Mr. J. W. Whytock 



Finance and Foundation Committee 



Mr. J. W. Whytock, Chairman 



Mr. A. C. Carswell 



Mr. H. G. Cook 



Membership Committee 

Mr. W. R. McLaren, Chairman 
140 Shanty Bay Road, Barrie, Ontario 



Vice-Chairman 



Mrs. M. Ellames 



Members 



Mrs. O. H. Antoft, R.R. 1, Kentville, Nova Scotia 

Mr. M. Bowes, 24 Mountain Street, Merriton Ward, St .Catharines, Ontario 
Mr. F. Blakeney, 963 Arundel Drive, Victoria, British Columbia 
Mr. W. G. Borland, 2374 Grand Boulevard, Montreal 28, Quebec 
Mr. W. C. Buchanan, 189 Park Street, Sydney, Nova Scotia 
Mr. L. M. Brown, 38 King High Avenue, Downsview, Ontario 
Mrs. B. Crowe, 1 14 Leacrest Drive, Leaside, Toronto 17, Ontario 
Mrs. J. H. Gable, 22 Wellington Street West, Barrie, Ontario 
Mr. T. Graham, Box 32, Lynden, Ontario 
Dr. T. E. Harris, 172 Patrick Street, St. John's, Newfoundland 
Mr. E. B. Jubien, 150 Vivian Avenue, Mount Royal, Quebec 
Mrs. W. A. MacDonald, 174 Baltimore Road, Winnipeg 13, Manitoba 
Mrs. R. E. Murdock, 2785 Crescent View Drive, North Vancouver, British 
Columbia 

Mrs. R. F. Smith, 36 Berkinshaw Crescent, Don Mills, Ontario 

Mr. O. E. Stephenson, 10 Faircroft Boulevard, Scarborough, Ontario 



Nominating Committee 



Mr. O. E. Bowles 
Mr. J. W. Whytock 



Mr. F. E. Goulding, Chairman 
Mr. W. R. McLaren 
Mr. R. A. Lyle 



Programme Committee 



Mrs. R. M. Brophy 
Mr. S. McConnell 



Mr. L. M. Brown, Chairman 

Mr. P. A. McDougall 
Mr. J. Schloen 



Properties Committee 
Mr. G. S. Flagler, Chairman 



Mr. H. G. Cook 



9 



Publications Committee 

Mr. O. E. Bowles, 22 Cameron Crescent, Toronto 17, Ontario, Chairman 
Mr. R. Vezina, 72 Celestine Drive, Weston, Ontario 
Vice-Chairman and Editor of "The Rose Bulletin" 
Mr. Theo. Mayer, 4524 Madison Ave., Montreal 28, Quebec 
Editor of "The Canadian Rose Annual" 
Mr. H. C. Cross Mrs. W. A. MacDonald Mr. Archie Selwood 

Advertising Committee 
Mr. O. E. Bowles, Chairman 

Hospitality Committee 
Mrs. R. M. Brophy, Chairman 

Publicity and Public Relations Committee 
Mr. Val Taylor, Chairman 

Vice-Chairman 
Mr. P. A. McDougall 

Members 

Mr. O. E. Bowles Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Marshall 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Carswell Mrs. P. A. McDougall 

Mr. H. G. Cook Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Whytock 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Cox Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Wilson 

Centennial Project Committee 
Mrs. H. P. Marshall, Chairman 

Royal Winter Fair and Speakers Committee 

Mr. C. R. Stephenson, Chairman 
Mr. R. A. Lyle Mrs. H. P. Marshall 



REGIONAL DIRECTORS COMMITTEE 

Mrs. S. Jupp, Chairman 
186 St. Leonards Avenue, Toronto, Ontario 



REGIONAL DIRECTORS 

Region 1 

Mr. F. Blakeney, 963 Arundel Drive, Victoria, British Columbia 

Mr. Archie Selwood,1450 West 40th Ave., Vancouver 13, British Columbia 

Mrs. P. Walkinshaw, 2427 West 36th Ave., Vancouver, British Columbia 

Region 2 

Mr. Alex Allan, 9225-96 Street, Edmonton, Alberta 
Mrs. W. H. Dowling 910-4th Ave. N.W., Calgary, Alberta 
Mr. Percy Wright, 407- 109th St., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 



10 



Region 3 

Mrs. W. A. MacDonald, 1 74 Baltimore Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba 
Mr. H. C. Westbrook, 48 Prospect Ave., Port Arthur, Ontario 

Region 4 

Mrs. A. L. Naismith, 116 Arnold Street, Hamilton, Ontario 
Mrs. Alan H. Heideman, 373 Park Street N., Peterborough, Ontario 
Mr. George H. Magee, 775 Roselawn Drive, Windsor, Ontario 
Major N. S. McKechnie, 825 Colson Ave., Ottawa 8, Ontario 

Region 5 

Mr. Louis T. Beaulieu, 718 St. Cyrille West, Quebec City 6, Quebec 
Mr. W. George Borland, 2374 Grand Boulevard, Montreal 28, Quebec 
Mr. Harold G. Gross, 702 Churchill Place, Baie d'Urfe, Quebec 
Mr. Theo Mayer, 4524 Madison Avenue, Montreal 28, Quebec 
Mr. E. B. Jubien, 150 Vivian Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, Montreal, 
Quebec 

Region 6 

Mr. L. A. Miller, P.O. Box 408, Dalhousie, New Brunswick 

Mrs. O. H. An toft, R.R. No. 1, Kentville, Nova Scotia 

Mr. L. M. LeLacheur, R.R. No. 2, Hatsfield's Point, New Brunswick 

Region 7 

Dr. R. G. Lea, 170-172 Fitzroy Street, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island 
AFFILIATED SOCIETIES 



American Rose Society 
Baie d'Urfe Horticultural Society 
Barrie Horticultural Society 
Bedford Horticultural Society 
Bermuda Rose Society 
Brantford Horticultural Society 
Calgary and District Horticultural 
Society 

Chapleau Horticultural Society 
Cloverleaf Garden Club 
Don Mills Horticultural Society 
Dunnville Horticultural Society 
Eastnor Horticultural Society 
Etobicoke Horticultural Society 
Fort Maiden Horticultural Society 
Greater Windsor Horticultural Society 
Greenfield Park Horticultural Society 
Guelph Horticultural Society 
Halifax Horticultural Society 
Hamilton and District Rose Society 
La Salle Horticultural Society 
Leaside Horticultural Society 
London Rose Society 
Long Island Rose Society 
Markham Horticultural Society 
Metro Rose Society of Detroit 
Mimico Horticultural Society 
Minnesota Rose Society 
Mount Hamilton Horticultural Society 
Montreal West Horticultural Society 



National Rose Society of Australia 

North Toronto Horticultural Society 

Northern Electric Club 

Oshawa Horticultural Society 

Owen Sound Horticultural Society 

Pacific Rose Society 

Parma Rose Society 

Pembroke Horticultural Society 

Peterborough Horticultural Society 

Port Arthur Horticultural Society 

Rice Lake Horticultural Society 

Rosemere Horticultural Society 

Sault Ste. Marie Horticultural Society 

St. Lambert Horticultural Society 

Saginaw Rosarians 

Scarborough Horticultural Society 

Schenectady Rose Society 

Sioux Lookout Horticultural Society 

South Land Rose Society 

Sudbury Horticultural Society 

Timmins Horticultural Society 

Toronto Horticultural Society 

Town of Mount Royal Horticultural 

Society 
Vancouver Rose Society 
Victoria Horticultural Society 
West End Horticultural Society 
Winnipeg Horticultural Society 
York Centre Horticultural Society 



11 



A Message From the President 



Centennial greetings are the order for 1967. 

Canada's National Rose Society joins in the celebration com- 
memorating our first century as a nation. 

What a century ! What a country ! 

We point with pride to 54 years of service by our society during 
that century. 

On the 19th of February, 1913, the inaugural meeting of "The 
Rose Society of Ontario" was held at the residence of Mrs. Allen 
Baines, 228 Bloor Street West, Toronto. Mrs. Baines was elected the 
first President of the Society. 

By 1918 men were admitted to membership in the Society. The 
first male member to become President was the Society's triird presi- 
dent, the late Aubrey D. Heward, who served in 1919 and 1920. The 
Society developed rapidly and during the period from 1924 to 1933, 
according to Mr. A. J. Webster in his article in the 1959 Annual, the 
late Dr. J. Horace McFarland described the Society's Rose Show as 
the third greatest of outdoor-grown roses on the North American 
Continent. 

In 1 942 the Society decided to suspend operations for the dura- 
tion of the War. 

No further year book was published until 1949, after several 
years of struggle to re-establish the Society. 

At the Annual Meeting held on the 6th day of October, 1954, 
the name of the Society was changed to "The Canadian Rose 
Society". The 1955 year book was the first to carry the name of "The 
Canadian Rose Society". 

In the ensuing decade the Society's membership reflected the 
new national character as we welcomed rose enthusiasts from Victoria, 
Vancouver, Prince Rupert Vernon, Kamloops in British Columbia, 
Calgary, Lethbridge, Didsbury and Edmonton in Alberta; Regina, 
Yorkton, Saskatoon and Kindersley in Saskatchewan; Winnipeg, 
Portage la Prairie, Brandon and Flin Flon in Manitoba; Quebec 



12 



City, Montreal, Lachine, Drummondville, Valois, Sherbrooke, 
Valleyfiield in Quebec; Edmundston, Dalhousie, Campbellton and 
Moncton in New Brunswick; Lunenberg, Annapolis Royal, New 
Glasgow, Glace Bay, Sydney and Halifax in Nova Scotia; Ghar- 
lottetown, Summerside, Vernon and Bedeque in Prince Edward 
Island; St John's, Cornerbrooke and Cupids King in Newfoundland. 

Together with our Ontario membership with its great strength in 
Toronto, but spread throughout the Province to Hamilton, Ingersoll, 
Kingston, London, Niagara Falls, Ottawa, Peterborough, Windsor, 
Cobourg, Fort William, St. Catharines, Walkerton, Barrie, Dunnville, 
Sioux Lookout, Guelph, Kirkland Lake, Sault Ste. Marie, Port 
Arthur, Owen Sound, Kitchener, Sudbury, Woodstock, Sarnia, 
Stratford, Welland, North Bay, Orillia, Goderich Cornwall and many 
others we formed "The Canadian Rose Society". 

We are proud to number members from 25 of the United States 
of America as well as a dozen countries overseas. 

On December 11, 1 96 1 , the Society received its charter from the 
Secretary of State of Canada to be a body corporate "to further the 
study of roses, to promote the cultivation thereof, to discover and dis- 
seminate knowledge of the conditions favourable to the culture of 
roses throughout Canada by means of publications, scientific trials, the 
holding of exhibitions, the maintenance of public display gardens and 
other activities". 

To implement these objects is our purpose and duty, our cen- 
tennial project; our project for each ensuing year. 

Milton A. Cads by 



13 



The Annual Meeting 



Orville E. Bowles 

The twelfth Annual Meeting of The Canadian Rose Society was 
held on October 4th, 1966 at The Civic Garden Centre, Edwards 
Gardens, Don Mills, Toronto, Ontario and was opened at 8.30 p.m. 
by the President, Mr. M. A. Gadsby, Q.C., who presided over the 
meeting. Owing to the absence of the Secretary, Mrs. P. A. 
McDougall, the minutes of the meeting were recorded by Mr. O. E. 
Bowles. 

It was a pleasure to have a beautiful evening for the meeting 
which was well attended and those present were welcomed by the 
President in a few words of greeting. Assurance was then requested 
from the Acting Secretary that a quorum was present and that the 
meeting was properly assembled in accordance with the Society's 
constitution and by-laws. 

Upon a motion being made by Mr. C. R. Stephenson, 
seconded by Mr. Val Taylor, the minutes of the Annual Meeting 
held on October 7th, 1965, and recorded in the 1966 Annual, were 
accepted as published. 

Mr. O. E. Bowles, a member of the Nominating Committee, in 
accordance with By-law No. 1 section 17, advised the meeting that 
no nominations had been received other than those put forward by 
the Nominating Committee and moved that the following members 
be elected Directors for a period of three ( 3 ) years, namely 
Mrs. R. M. Brophy Mr. G. S. Flagler Mr. J. Schloen 
Mr. H. G. Cook Mr. R. A. Lyle Mr. R. G. Vezina 
Mr. W. R. McLaren 

This motion was seconded by Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn. 

The Treasurer, Mr. A. C. Carswell, drew to the attention of the 
meeting the Society's Statement of Receipts and Disbursements for 
the year ending December 31, 1965, as recorded in the 1966 Annual 
and moved the adoption of this statement which was seconded by 
Mr. W. R. McLaren. 



14 



Mr. Carswell then presented an interim report for the current 
year to September 30th and was pleased to be able to show the 
Society's financial position as being in a sound condition. 

The Treasurer then moved a vote of thanks on behalf of the 
Society to our auditors, Mr. S. B. Bartlett G.A. and Mr. W. J. 
Keenan R.I.A. and suggested that they be reappointed for 1967. 
This motion was seconded by Mr. L. M. Brown. 

The President then addressed the meeting as follows : 

"The year 1965-1966 was a most active one for your society. 
Under the leadership of your Board of Directors a very ambitious 
program was carried on. 

I'm sure you have all enjoyed our Rose Annual and The Rose 
Bulletin. The editor of the Annual, Mr. O. E. Bowles, tendered his 
resignation effective with the publication of the 1966 Annual. His 
resignation was accepted with regret. He deserves the highest com- 
mendation for his superb work as editor. Fortunately his talent is 
still available as a Vice-President of the Society. The 1966 edition 
of the Annual was a typical Bowles effort produced on time despite 
our editor's serious illness. I'm sure you have enjoyed it. 

I am pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Theo Mayei 
of Montreal as editor of the 1967 Annual. Mr. Mayer is a well 
known author and collector of rose literature. We are looking forward 
to his first production with keen anticipation. 

My resignation as editor of the Bulletin was made possible by 
the appointment of Mr. Robert G. Vezina as editor. I number 
myself as one of his fans after enjoying his fine Bulletins so much. 

During the year Mrs. Ena Harkness of Hitchen, Herts, who 
opened our 1965 National Show was elected a Patron of the Society 
as was Mr. Sam McGredy of Portadown, Northern Ireland, who 
opened the 1966 show. 

We suffered the loss of Mrs. Alan Gow of Toronto, a former 
Director of The Rose Society of Ontario, who some years ago 
generously presented me with her library of year books dating back 
to 1929. Also the loss of our Honorary Director Mr. Emerson 
Mitchell of Windsor. Both lived to ripe old ages pursuing their 
hobby to the end. 

Two new trophies were accepted during the year. The Alan 
Stollery Memorial Trophy from the Stollery family, and one from 
Miss F. Fyfe Smith, a Patron of Vancouver, in honour of her parents. 



15 



The Society was represented at the Garden Club of Toronto 
spring show at O'Keefe Centre and will be again in 1967. 

Twenty-five thousand brochures which bore the seal of The 
Canadian Rose Society were distributed by The Canadian Nursery 
Trades Association in order to publicize the introduction of the new 
rose variety 'Miss Canada'. A picture of that rose graced the cover 
of the I.O.D.E. Echo, which carried a story about our society. 

Our spring meeting featured an outstanding collection of slides 
gathered from all over the world. It was followed by the National 
Show held in conjunction with The Brampton Festival of Flowers. 
Prior to the show Sheridan Nurseries Limited entertained the Directors 
at a dinner in honour of our guest, Mr. Sam McGredy, which was 
notable for its conviviality. 

In the spring representatives of the Society attended at different 
Garden Centres and offered advice to many growers. 

In September our Past President and Director, Mrs. H. P. 
Marshall lectured to a judging course held at the Royal Botanical 
Gardens in Hamilton. A booklet on the judging of roses is now under 
consideration. 

Our Secretary in her quiet efficient manner serviced members 
across the country. 

The Society provided speakers and judges for local rose societies 
in Ontario and medals for all its affiliates. 

None of these activities would have been possible without the 
support and effort of your Directors. They are truly a wonderful 
group of people. Any success I have achieved as your President, I 
owe to their help and support. 

Now we are all looking forward with anticipation to the 
Centennial Year. What better way to celebrate than by planting a 
few more of your favorite roses." 

Mr. Leo Brown, Chairman of the Programme Committee, then 
presented the program that had been arranged and introduced by 
Mr. John Schloen of Ellesmere Nurseries Ltd., who is also a Director 
of the Society. Mr. Schloen spoke about the new rose mutations 
created by X-ray radiation and presented a very interesting picture 
of what has been accomplished and what might be anticipated 
through this new procedure. At the conclusion the speaker was 
thanked by Mr. R. G. Vezina. 



16 



The meeting was then treated to a display of coloured slides of 
roses by Mrs. Audrey Harris, botanist and expert colour photographer 
who is a member of the Colour Photographers Association of Canada. 
During the showing of the slides she pointed out faults in the 
photography which was all very interesting and informative. At the 
conclusion of the demonstration and lecture she was thanked by Mrs. 
H. P. Marshall. 

The Autumn Show brought forth many very fine blooms. The 
report of the judges, Mrs. H. P. Marshall and Mrs. Fraser Robertson, 
was then presented by Mrs. Sheila Jupp, Chairman of the Exhibition 
Committee, and it was learned that the S. McGredy & Sons 
Challenge Cup for an exhibit of six distinct varieties shown in C.R.S. 
boxes was won by Mr. Douglas Brooks for a very fine exhibit. 
Another member staging many fine exhibits was Mrs. Lyzaniwsky 
who won the S. B. Bartlett Challenge Trophy for the highest 
aggregate score in all classes. 

As this concluded all business to come before the meeting it 
was then adjourned to allow those present to view the show and 
visit with their friends while enjoying the lovely refreshments pre- 
pared by Mrs. R. M. Brophy and her committee. 



17 



THE CANADIAN ROSE SOCIETY 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1966 

Cash in Bank, January 1st, 1966 $1,080.05 
Government of Canada Bearer Bond 1,000.00 



Audited : 



RECEIPTS 

Membership Dues $5,645.95 

Advertising — Year Book 2,022.50 

Sale of Year Books 41.50 

Donations 111.50 

Rose Show 1,090.55 

Sale of Medals 25.35 

Sales of Colour Guides 2.25 

Interest — Canadian Government Bond 52.50 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Printing, Stationery, Office Supplies $ 536.32 

Postage 154.00 

Honorarium and Casual Help 620.75 
Year Book, 1966 5,424.02 

Year Book, 1967 720.03 

Bulletin 629.36 

Insurance 66.52 

Membership Services 78.75 

Meetings — Rentals, Etc. 259.86 

Rose Show 162.05 

Garden Club — O'Keefe Centre 60.00 

Medals and Trophies 265.45 

Publicity and Advertising 109.08 

Legal Fees 27.00 

Bank Charges 1.80 



Cash in Bank December 31st, 1966 $ 957.16 

Government of Canada Bearer Bond 1,000.00 



S. B. Bartlett, C.A. (Signed) 
W. J. Keenan, R.I.A. (Signed) 



$ 2,080.05 



$ 8,992.10 
$11,072.15 



$ 9,114.99 

1,957.16 
$11,072.15 



18 



The Canadian National 
Rose Show 1966 

Sheila Jupp 

This, alas, was the year of "Great Disappointments," and some 
explanation is due to members for the early date of the Show, held in 
Brampton on Saturday, June 18th. Early in the year, the Canadian 
Rose Society was approached with a pressing request to stage the 
National Rose Show as the Number one attraction in the Brampton 
Festival of Flowers, already timed for presentation from June 17th 
to 20th. Due to long-time bookings of other attractions, no change in 
the date was possible. In all other respects the prospects were very 
favourable : the Brampton Curling Club provided an excellent setting, 
with good facilities for exhibitors, and the Festival Committee was 
most co-operative. But it was only after considerable heart searching 
that it was decided to take a calculated risk on the date. What 
wrecked all calculations, of course, was the worst spring in the history 
of weather reports, with the result that there were many disappointed 
exhibitors and numbers of well-known names missing from the list. 
If it is any consolation to these sufferers, "Nevermor Quoth the 
Raven" is the verdict on early show dates in the future ! 

Notwithstanding the failure of the garden rose crop, it was still of 
the utmost importance that the Show be a scene of beauty and interest 
to the visiting public, and the credit for this achievement must be 
accorded where it belongs. First of all, warm thanks must be given 
to the Society's always generous friends the commercial rose growers, 
who really came to the rescue this year. Dale-Calvert Estates Ltd. of 
Brampton put in a most beautiful exhibit in the Commercial Section, 
while H. J. Mills Ltd. of Richmond Hill and Concord Floral Com- 
pany contributed some six thousand gorgeous blooms, which were 
built up into a spectacular display. Here again, the last-minute build- 
ing of such a display is no mean task, and thanks for this effort go to 
the committee from Brampton Horticultural Society, convened by 



19 



Mrs. H. Caldwell, and to the innumerable volunteers who added their 

assistance. 

Next in this list of credits come the stupendous efforts by con- 
tributors to the Decorative Section, under the leadership of Mrs. A. B. 
Meiklejohn and Mrs. R. A. Lyle. When the lateness of the season 
became beyond hope, an emergency directive was issued permitting, 
for this show only, the substitution of greenhouse for garden grown 
roses. An extra class was added entitled "Challenge," which called 
for the best extemporary achievement with a dozen roses and ever- 
green foliage provided on the morning of the show, exhibitor to 
provide container and mechanics. Such a hive of industry, with such 
proliferous and outstanding results, has seldom been seen. Mention 
should be made of the public-spirited attitude of these exhibitors, who 
were working against the clock primarily for the benefit of the show 
rather than personal success. This was a real communal effort and 
much appreciated both by the Show Chairman and by the public 
which later enjoyed their efforts. 

Cultural Talks throughout the afternoon were also added to the 
programme. Given by such experts as Mr. E. Billington and Mr. W. 
J. Keenan, these proved very popular as evidenced by the high degree 
of attendance and interest shown. Door Prizes, generously donated by 
a number of the advertisers in the Society's Annual, provided 
moments of excitement and satisfaction for visitors. 

The Show was officially opened at 3.00 p.m. by Mr. Sam 
McGredy, fourth generation of the famous rose - hybridizing 
McGredys of the Royal Nurseries of Portadown, Northern Ireland. 
After completion of the Opening Ceremonies, "Sam" was to be seen 
throughout the afternoon mingling and chatting with visitors, and his 
genial personality and deep knowledge was much enjoyed by all who 
had the privilege of meeting him. The Canadian Rose Society counts 
itself highly honoured by the presence of such illustrious visitors as Mr. 
Sam McGredy and Mrs. Ena Harkness, who opened last year's show. 
It was particularly appropriate that the awards this year for the Best 
Rose in Show and the Best White Rose in Show went to specimens 
of "Ena Harkness" and "McGredy's Ivory" respectively. 

The "Ena Harkness" bloom won the new Alan Stollery 
Memorial Trophy and also the Red Rose Tea Trophy for Mr. F. G. 
Purvis of Vancouver, while "McGredy's Ivory" earned the Shell 
Canada Ltd., White Rose Division, Award for Mrs. A. L. Naismith 



20 



9pF 




i 



'WINEFRED CLARKE' (H.T.) 
'Peace X 'Lydia 
Raised by Herbert Robinson 

TRIAL GROUND CERTIFICATE 1 965 




'ALTISSIMO' (Climber) 
Raised by Delbard-Chabert, France 

TRIAL GROUND CERTIFICATE AND CERTIFICATE OF MERIT I965 



of Hamilton. Mrs. Naismith also carried off the Sir Harry Oakes 
Trophy Sweepstakes Award, for the third consecutive year, and the 
Royal National Rose Society of Great Britain Medal for highest 
aggregate points in the Floribunda Section. The Novice Sweepstakes 
Award of the Col. W. G. McKendrick Trophy went to Mr. A. F. 
Chisholm of Willowdale. Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn repeated as winner 
of the Harkness Roses of England Trophy for the Best Decorative 
Arrangement and the Mrs. Schuyler C. Snively Rose Bowl Award 
for highest aggregate points in the Decorative Section. 

A campaign this year to encourage more representative entries 
in the Airborne Section showed early signs of success, with indications 
of possible exhibits from several new areas both in Canada and the 
United States. One member, Mr. C. Bauer of Lethbridge, Alberta, 
even resorted to polyethylene protection in an effort to bring his roses 
along in time — but the weather defeated even him. Our sympathies, 
Mr. Bauer, and hopes that next year will bring the success your 
enthusiasm deserves, when we may have the pleasure of seeing your 
blooms on the Show Tables. Vancouver, with a kinder climate, 
responded nobly to the appeal, and the beautiful blooms of Mr. Sel- 
wood, Mrs. Walkinshaw and Mr. Purvis were an outstanding feature 
of the Show. As previously mentioned, Mr. Purvis won Best Rose in 
Show and Best Red Rose with a beautiful "Ena Harkness", but the 
competition from an almost equally perfect "Pink Favourite" from 
Mr. Selwood was so extremely close that the Judges took the unpre- 
cedented step of declaring a "Runner-up." Congratulations, Mr. 
Purvis, and we hope that this success will encourage you to send more 
exhibits in future years. Mr. Selwood took the Canadian Rose Society 
Silver Medal for Highest Aggregate Score in the Airborne Section by 
one point over Mrs. Walkinshaw. 

Canadian Rose Society Silver Medals for Highest Aggregate in 
the Hybrid Tea, Grandiflora and Climbing Rose Sections all went to 
Dr. Carl Moyle of Hamilton. As was only to be expected, the Novice, 
Junior and Open Sections were the hardest hit by the late season, but 
Mr. H. G. Cook, one of the Society's Directors, lost his 'novice' status 
by winning the C.R.S. Bronze Medal for a specimen Hybrid Tea rose. 
It's an ill wind that brings no one any good, and this year's timing 
was just right for the miniature roses, usually past their best by Show 
date. Twenty-six entries in five classes provided a fascinating display 
of these little gems and, amid stiff competition, Mr. J. V. Laffey 



21 



carried off the Silver Medal in this Section. Old-fashioned roses also 
came into their own, and prizes of rose bushes were won by Mr. R. M. 
Peirce of London, Mrs. V. Hawkins and Mrs. J. Lowe, both of 
Toronto. 

We can never stress too often, or too forcibly, the importance of 
exhibitors completing every detail on both halves of the entry tags 
attached to their entries. After judging, the torn off bottom halves 
supply the information on which is based both point scoring for 
successful exhibitors and assessment of performance of individual 
rose varieties. 

At the conclusion of the Show, the Brampton Festival of Flowers 
Committee added an interesting innovation to the traditional Rose 
Auction, with the introduction of a professional auctioneer. Action 
waxed fast and furious as the six thousand strong multitude of green- 
house roses came under the hammer, and at the close it appeared as 
though everyone was carrying roses as the crowd drifted away to 
attend the fireworks display with which the day ended. 

To sum up — from the point of view of the Society's relation- 
ships with the general public, the Show proved, against all the odds, to 
be at least reasonably successful, as evidenced by much appreciative 
comment and a number of new memberships; from the point of view 
of the Society's own members and exhibitors, it was a sad and bitter 
disappointment. We can only hope that you will temper your criticism 
with pity for the poor Show Committee and its Chairman, whose 
disappointment was at least equal to yours ! See you next year ! 



22 



Trophies and Prizes Awarded at 
The 1966 Rose Show 



Brampton Curling Club, Brampton, Ontario, June 18, 1966 
MAJOR AWARDS 

Best Rose in Show — Alan Stollery Memorial Trophy — "Ena Harkness", 

Mr. F. G. Purvis, Vancouver, B.C. 
Best Red Rose in Show — Red Rose Tea Trophy — "Ena Harkness", Mr. 

F. G. Purvis, Vancouver, B.C. 
Best White or Near White Rose in Show — Shell Canada Ltd., White Rose 

Division, Award — "McGredy's Ivory", Mrs. A. L. Naismith, Hamilton. 
Best Decoration Arrangement — Harkness Roses of Hitchin, England, Silver 

Cup — Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn, Toronto. 
Sweepstakes Award — Sir Harry Oakes Trophy — Mrs. A. L. Naismith, 

Hamilton. 

Novice Sweepstakes Award — Col. W. G. McKendrick Trophy — Mr. A. F. 
Chisholm, Willowdale. 

SECTION A — Canadian Rose Society National Trophy Classes 

Class 

4. P. L. Whytock Challenge Trophy — Exhibit of Floribunda or Polyantha 
Roses. Three varieties, two stems of each, shown in individual containers 
— 1 Mrs. A. L. Naismith (Pinkie, Spice & Dusky Maiden) . 

SECTION C — Regional Trophy Classes 

10. Frederick F. Dufton Memorial Challenge Trophy — Three varieties, yellow 
H.T. roses, one specimen bloom of each. Shown in individual containers — 
1 No Award, 2 Mrs. A. L. Naismith, 3 No Award. 

11. Sir William Meredith Trophy — Three varieties, pink H.T. roses, one 
specimen bloom of each, shown in individual containers — 1 Mrs. A. L. 
Naismith (Picture, Confidence & Tiffany), 2 No Award, 3 No Award. 

12. Miss Vera McCann Challenge Trophy — Three varieties, red H.T. roses, 
one specimen bloom of each. Shown in individual containers — 1 No 
Award, 2 Mr. J. V. Laffey, 3 No Award. 

13. Archie Selwood Challenge Trophy — Three varieties, blend or bi-colour 
H.T. roses, one specimen bloom of each. Shown in individual containers — 
1 No Award, 2 No Award, 3 Mr. Val Taylor. 

Canadian Rose Society Silver Medal for Highest Aggregate score in Classes 
9 to 1 3 inclusive — Mrs. A. L. Naismith, Hamilton. 



23 



SECTION D — Hybrid Teas, Specimen Blooms 

White or Near White 
15. One Specimen Bloom, any named variety except Burnaby — 3 Mr. Val 
Taylor. 

Medium to Deep Yellow 
18. One Specimen Bloom, any named variety — 1 Mrs. A. L. Naismith 
(Fantasia), 2 Mr. J. V. Laffey (Summer Sunshine), 3 Dr. C. T. Moyle 
(Eclipse). 
Yellow Blend 

21. One Specimen Bloom, Sutter's Gold— 1 Dr. C. T. Moyle, 3 Mr. Val. 
Taylor. 

22. One Specimen Bloom, any named variety except Peace or Sutter's Gold — 
1 Dr. C. T. Moyle, 2 Mr. P. A. McDougall (Fascinating), 3 Mr. R. 
Vezina (Fascinating). 

Apricot and Orange Blend 

23. One Specimen Bloom, any named variety — 1 Mr. O. E. Bowles 
(Tzigane), 2 Dr. C. T. Moyle (Signora). 

Pale Pink 

24. One Specimen Bloom, Michelle Meilland — 1 Mr. Stan Jenkins, 2 Mr. Val 
Taylor, 3 Dr. C. T. Moyle. 

Pink Blend 

29. One Specimen Bloom, Tiffany— 1 Mrs. A. L. Naismith, 2 Dr. C. T. 
Moyle, 3 Mr. M. A. Gadsby. 

30. One Specimen Bloom, any named variety except Kordes Perfecta or 
Tiffany — 1 No Award, 2 Mr. P. A. McDougall, 3 Mrs. A. L. Naismith. 

Deep Pink and Light Red 

32. One Specimen Bloom, any named variety except Superstar (Tropicana) — 
1 Mr. W. E. Connolly (John S. Armstrong), 2 Mrs. A. L. Naismith 
(Patrick Anderson) . 

Red 

33. One Specimen Bloom, Crimson Glory — 3 Dr. C. T. Moyle. 

34. One Specimen Bloom, any named variety except Crimson Glory — 1 Mr. 
S. C. Sterling (Red Peace), 2 Mrs. A. L. Naismith (Josephine Bruce), 3 
Mr. Stan Jenkins (Konrad Adenauer) . 

Red Blends & Bi-colours 

35. One Specimen Bloom, any named variety — 1 Dr. C. T. Moyle, 2 Mr. 
S. C. Sterling (Granada), 3 Mr. Stan Jenkins (Granada) . 

H.T. Single Varieties 

37. Naturally grown Single Specimen H.T. — 2 Mr. M. A. Cadsby (Irish 
Elegance), 3 Mrs. A. L. Naismith (White Wings). 

Canadian Rose Society Silver Medal for Highest Aggregate Score in Classes 
14 to 37 inclusive — Dr. C. T. Moyle, Hamilton. 

SECTION E 
To Show Cycle Bloom of H.T. Rose 

38. Three roses, one variety. One bud one-fourth open, one bloom one-half 
open and one bloom fully open (Centre may show) — 1 Mrs. A. L. 
Naismith (Fascinating), 2 Mr. Val Taylor (Michelle Meilland), 3 Mr. 
O. E. Bowles (Margaret). 



24 



SECTION F — Floribundas or Polyanthus, naturally grown spray or 

naturally grown single specimen. 

39. P. L. Whytock Challenge Trophy — a Collection of Floribunda or Poly- 
antha Roses, not fewer than six varieties, two sprays of each variety. 
Shown in individual containers — 1 Mrs. A. L. Naismith. 

41. One Spray Single or Semi-double Floribunda Pink — 3 Mrs. A. L. 
Naismith. 

42. One Spray Double Floribunda Red — 1 Mr. P. A. McDougall (Inde- 
pendence), 2 Mrs. A. L. Naismith (Frensham). 

43. One Spray Double Floribunda Pink — 1 No Award, 2 No Award, 3 Mr. 
Val Taylor, Mr. P. A. McDougall, Mr. S. C. Sterling. 

44. One Spray Floribunda White — 1 Mrs. A. L. Naismith (Iceberg), 2 Mrs. 
A. A. Bailie (Iceberg), 3 Mrs. R. M. Peirce (Saratoga). 

46. One Spray Floribunda Yellow — 3 Dr. C. T. Moyle (Starlet). 

47. One Spray Floribunda Multi-colour — 2. Mr. W. E. Connolly (Golden 
Slipper), 3 Mr. Val Taylor. 

48. One Spray Polyantha Roses, any variety — 3 Mr. P. A. McDougall (China 
Doll). 

Royal National Rose Society of Great Britain Medal for Highest aggregate 
score in Classes 40 to 48 inclusive — Mrs. A. L. Naismith. 

SECTION G — Grandifloras 

49. One naturally grown spray, or naturally grown single specimen, Red — 2 
Mr. W. E. Connolly (Montezuma). 

51. One naturally grown spray, or naturally grown single specimen, White — 2 
Mrs. A. L. Naismith (Mt. Shasta) . 

52. One naturally grown spray, or naturally grown single specimen, Pink — 2 
Mr. S. C. Sterling (Pink Parfait), 3 Mrs. A. L. Naismith (Pink Parfait). 
Canadian Rose Society Silver Medal for highest aggregate score in Classes 
49 to 52 inclusive — Mrs. A. L. Naismith. 

SECTION H — Hybrid Perpetual 

53. Ella Baines Memorial Challenge Trophy — Three Hybrid Perpetuals, one 
or more varieties — 1 No Award, 2 Mrs. A. L. Naismith. 

54. T. Eaton Co. Ltd. Challenge Trophy, One Specimen Bloom Hybrid 
Perpetual — 2 Mrs. A. L. Naismith. 

SECTION J — Climbing Roses 

57. Two laterals Pink Climbing Roses — 1 No Award, 2 Dr. C. T. Moyle 
(Inspiration), 3 Mrs. A. A. Bailie. 

58. Two laterals Red Climbing Roses — 3 Mr. F. E. Goulding (Paul's 
Scarlet). 

SECTION K — Miniature Roses, Bush or Climbing 

60. One Spray or Bloom Red Miniature Rose — 1 Mrs. W. Lyzaniwsky, 2 Mrs. 
C. T. Wilson (Coralin), 3 Mrs. N. A. MacKay (Oakingham Ruby). 

61. One Spray or Bloom Yellow Miniature Rose — 1 Mr. P. A. McDougall 
(Rosina), 2 Mr. J. V. Laffey (Rosina), 3 Mrs. D. McLean (Baby 
Masquerade ) . 



25 



62. One Spray or Bloom White Miniature Rose — 1 Mr. J. V. Laffey (Para 
Ti), 2 Mr. P. A. McDougall (Pixie), 3 Mrs. W. Lyzaniwsky (For You). 

63. One Spray or Bloom Pink Miniature Rose — 1 Mr. J. V. Laffey (Humpty 
Dumpty), 2 Mrs. W. Lyzaniwsky (Rosada), 3 Mrs. A. L. Naismith (Sweet 
Fairy). 

64. Collection, Four different varieties, bloom or spray — 1 Mrs. G. T. Wilson, 

2 Mr. J. V. Laffey, 3 Mrs. W. Lyzaniwsky. 

Canadian Rose Society Silver Medal for Highest aggregate score in Classes 
60 to 64 inclusive — Mr. J. V. Laffey. 

SECTION L — Miscellaneous Roses including Old-Fashioned Roses, Rugosa, 
China, Bourbon, Moss, Species, Shrub, Seedlings and any other 
roses not covered in the above sections. 

65. One Naturally Grown Specimen or Spray, with or without side-buds — 1 
Mrs. J. H. Baillie (Agnes), 2 Mrs. R. F. Smith (Harrison's Yellow), 3 
Mr. E. D. Holdsworth (Agnes) . 

66. Old Rose Bouquet — To consist of eight or more blooms or sprays of 
blooms. May be all one variety or many. Points go to the Bouquets of 
many varieties. An old rose is to be considered one if introduced prior to 
1910. Sixty points given for quality of bloom, forty points for suitability of 
container, arrangement and fragrance. The container may be anything the 
exhibitor wishes to use — preferably something old — an antique or heir- 
loom. 

The Canadian Rose Society Award — Six plants of old-fashioned roses 
supplied by Carl Pallek & Son Nurseries at Virgil, Ontario, to be divided 
as follows : First Prize 3 bushes ; Second Prize 2 bushes ; Third Prize 1 bush. 
These prizes will be available only if there are THREE or more competitors 
in the class — 1 Mr. R. M. Peirce, 2 Mrs. V. Hawkins, 3 Mrs. J. Lowe. 

SECTION M — Fragrant Roses 

68. A. Alan Gow Memorial Trophy — Three roses, any variety or varieties 
shown in one container — 1 Mr. E. D. Holdsworth, 2 Mr. R. M. Peirce, 

3 Mrs. A. L. Naismith. 

69. C. Alan Snowdon Memorial Challenge Trophy — One Rose, any variety — 
1 Mrs. A. L. Naismith (Crimson Glory), 2 Mr. R. M. Peirce (Blanc Double 
de Coubert), 3 Mr. P. A. McDougall (Tzigane) . 



SECTION N — Novice Classes 

72. One Specimen H.T. Bloom — 1 Mr. H. G. Cook, 2 Mr. A. F. Chisholm. 
Canadian Rose Society Bronze Medal for First Award in this class — Mr. 
H. B. Cook. 

73. One Lateral of Climbing Roses (Climbing H.T.s, H.P.s or T.s excluded) — 

1 Mr. A. F. Chisholm (Blossomtime) . 

SECTION O — Airborne Exhibits 

75. Six H. T. Roses, named; any variety or varieties — 1 Mr. A. Selwood. 

76. Three H.T. Roses, named; any variety or varieties — 1 Mrs. W. 
Walkinshaw, 2 Mr. A. Selwood, 3 Mr. T. G. Purvis. 

77. One H.T. Rose, named; any variety — 1 Mr. T. G. Purvis (Ena Harkness), 

2 Mrs. W. Walkinshow (Show Girl), 3 Mr. A. Selwood (McGredy's 
Yellow). 



26 



Canadian Rose Society Silver Medal for highest aggregate score in Classes 
75 to 77 inclusive — Mr. A. Selwood. 

SECTION Q — Open Classes 

81. One H. T. Rose, named; any variety — 1 Mr. Bob Foster, London, Ont. 
(Sir Winston Churchill), 2 Mrs. D. Andrewes, London, Ont. (Briarcliffe), 
3 Mrs. H. Felle, London, Ont. (Margaret) . 

First Prize in each class to receive a membership in the Canadian Rose 
Society. 

SECTION R — Decorative Arrangements. Theme: "PARADE OF ROSES" 

82. "Flower Queen" — a crescent arrangement of roses (The Hon. George S. 
Henry Challenge Trophy) — 1 Mrs. R. A. Lyle, 2 Mrs. A. A. Bailie, 
3 Mrs. J. Lowe. 

83. "Carnival of Events" — a design showing new trends (Royal York 
Challenge Trophy) — 1 Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn, 2 Mrs. J. Lowe, 3 Mrs. 
R. F. Smith. 

84. "Festival Day and Night" — a design using white or near white roses and 
including some black — i.e. container, accessory, etc. (Mrs. P. A. Thomson 
Challenge Trophy) — 1 Mrs. R. F. Smith, 2 Mrs. J. H. Baillie, 3 Mrs. 
A. B. Meiklejohn. 

85. "Trooping of the Colour" — design using red roses (Lieut. Col. Hugh A. 
Rose Challenge Trophy) — 1 Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn, 2 Mrs. R. A. Lyle, 
3 Mrs. M. Ellames. 

86. "Home Beautification" — an all-round arrangement of roses suitable for a 
dinner table seating six; candles optional. (Mrs. Walter H. Lyon, Rose- 
holme Challenge Trophy) — 1 Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn, 2 Mrs. R. A. Lyle, 
3 Mrs. M. Ellames. 

87. "Mayor's Luncheon" — an all-round arrangement for a luncheon table 
seating six, suitable for the occasion (Miss Mabel Stoakley Challenge 
Trophy) — 1 No Award, 2 Mrs. H. Caldwell. 

88. "Art Exhibition" — a design using an accessory — 1 Mrs. M. Ellames, 2 
Mrs. R. A. Lyle, 3 Mrs. J. Lowe. 

89. "Fragrance in a Basket" — roses arranged in a small basket, arrangement 
not more than eighteen inches overall (Brig. A. E. Nash, M. C. Challenge 
Trophy) — 1 Mrs. M. Ellames, 2 Mrs. M. A. Cadsby, 3 Mrs. J. H. Baillie. 

90. "Guests of Honour" — (a) Corsage — 1 Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn, (b) 
Boutonniere — 1 Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn, 2 Mr. P. A. McDougall. 

91. "Littlest Guest" — a miniature arrangement, not over 6" in any direction 
— 1 Mrs. J. Lowe, 2 Mrs. M. Ellames, 3 Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn. 

92. "Yesteryear in Brampton" — an arrangement in an antique-type con- 
tainer. Other flowers may be included (Mr. Seely B. Brush Memorial 
Challenge Trophy) — 1 Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn, 2 Mrs. J. Lowe, 3 Mrs. 
R. F. Smith. 

93. "Grand Ball" — a symmetrical arrangement. Other flowers may be included. 
(Lady Kemp Memorial Challenge Trophy). 

Mrs. Schuyler C. Snively Rose Bowl Award for highest aggregate score in 
Classes 82 to 93 inclusive — Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn. 



27 



SECTION S — Novice (Decorative) 

94. "Roses for the Queen" — an arrangement of roses only, foliage of any 
kind permitted. (Mary and James Fyfe Smith Memorial Challenge Bowl) 

— 1 No Award, 2 Mrs. D. MacLean. 

SECTION T — Open (Decorative) 

95. Here Comes the Band" — a design in a metal container (brass, copper, 
etc. ) . Other flowers may be included. Open to anyone other man a member 
of the Canadian Rose Society — Mrs. E. Cowan, 2 Mrs. B. H. Mason, 3 Miss 
V. Holdsworth. 

Prize-winners in this class to receive H.T. Rose bushes. 

SECTION U — Supplementary Decorative 

96. "Challenge" — an extemporary arrangement from a dozen roses and ever- 
green foliage, provided at the Hall on Show Day, container and mechanics 
supplied by exhibitor. 

(a) Open to member of Canadian Rose Society — 1 Mrs. A. B. Meiklejohn, 
2 Mrs. R. A. Lyle, 3 Mrs. R. F. Smith. 

(b) Open to members of Brampton Horticultural Society — 1 Mrs. G. 
Gowland, 2 Mrs. W. Ridley, 3 Mr. W. Ridley. 

Total Number of Exhibitors 45 

Number of entries — Specimen 135 

Number of entries — Decorative 77 

Note — Due to lateness of the season, and consequent lack of entries 
in a number of classes, only classes where awards were made have 
been included in this report. 



23 



The Book Shelf 



THE ROSE by Roy Genders, 623 pp. — Robert Hale, Limited, 63 
Old Brampton Road, London, S.W. 7, England — 63 s/ -. 

Described as a complete handbook this is indeed a massive 
volume comprising 41 Chapters, commencing with the origin and 
early history of the Rose, its significance in Church history, heraldry, 
literature, art, music and in military activities. Much of this lengthy 
account of Rose development is a repetition of what has been pre- 
viously recorded by earlier writers. Chapters follow dealing in detail 
with Hybrid Teas, Floribundas, Dwarf Polyanthas, Hybrid Per- 
petuate, Miniatures, Chinas, Teas, Ramblers, Climbers, Species and 
Shrub Roses, both old and modern. All aspects of the culture of the 
various types are covered as well as their uses, methods of soil prepara- 
tion, fertilization and pruning requirements, insect and disease control, 
etc. Included, also, are lengthy lists of recommended varieties based on 
the author's own experience and observations, largely selections of 
British, French, German and American introduction. These varieties, 
naturally, are those considered hardy for the English climate, but 
readers should bear in mind that some of those recommended, espe- 
cially amongst the Large-Flowered Climbers, are not reliably hardy in 
Eastern Canada. Similarly, the author attributes fragrance to some 
varieties in which under Eastern and Central Canadian climatic con- 
ditions fragrance is either very faint or entirely absent. Several 
varieties of Spanish origin, such as Snow White (Dot), Girona and 
Federico Casas, all H.T.'s, are intensely fragrant but are not even 
mentioned. 

The book is profusely illustrated, 48 of the illustrations being in 
full colour exceedingly well executed, 69 are monochrome plates, 
while the remainder are composed of line drawings. 

While Mr. Genders has produced an exhaustive work a few 
errors have crept in, e.g. on Page 92 the originator of Gail Borden, 
H.T. is Wilhelm Kordes, not Jackson and Perkins; Page 116 the 
parentage of Josephine Bruce is generally acknowledged to be 
(Crimson Glory X Madge Whipp), not (Ena Harkness X Madge 



29 



Whipp); Page 241 — the reference to "General D. MacArthur'' 
apparently should appear as "General MacArthur", this famous old 
Rose having been introduced in 1904 and named to honour General 
Douglas MacArthur's father, the late General Arthur MacArthur; 
Page 286 — Red Favourite is described as an H.T., whereas it is a 
Floribunda; Page 256 — Pink Charming, H.T., according to 
Modern Roses V was hybridized and introduced in 1953 by the 
Dutch breeder, Leenders, not by the American hybridizer, Herbert 
Swim; Page 348 — The reference to "Miss Gertrude Willmott" pre- 
sumably should appear as "Miss Ellen Willmott" or possibly Miss 
Gertrude Jekyll while "Miss Molly Lawrence" should read "Miss 
Mary Lawrance". 

Notwithstanding the foregoing inaccuracies, and possibly a few 
others, this is a very valuable work and well worthy of a prominent 
place in the libraries of all serious Rosarians. 

— Dogrose. 

BEAUTIFUL ROSES, 134 pp. Text by P. Svoboda; IUustrations 
by /. Kaplicka; Translated from the Czech by Kevin Hartshorne; 
Produced for Spring Books by Westbook House, Fulham Broadway, 
London, England — 12/6. 

This volume is noteworthy principally because of the average 
excellence of the floral portraits of Mr. J. Kaplicka which are sur- 
passed, so far as this reviewer is aware, only by the water colours of 
the famous artist, Alfred Parsons, which constitute an important 
feature of the late Miss Ellen Willmott's "The Genus Rosa", now out 
of print and very difficult to obtain. Indeed, of the 56 Svoboda Plates 
in full colour only four invite criticism as failing to do justice to the 
varieties concerned. These are Crimson Glory, H.T., Gruss an 
Aachen, Flor., Paul's Scarlet Climber, H.W., and R. centifolia major 
— an exceptionally high percentage. 

The descriptive notes which accompany each Colour Plate are 
entitled to full marks for accuracy although there is some doubt 
amongst botanists as to whether or not Frau Karl Druschki was the 
first white Hybrid Perpetual. It seems appropriate here to mention 
also that the so-called Hybrid Musks (P. 15) are of doubtful hardiness 
in Eastern Canada. In this reviewer's experience they have invariably 
sustained serious winter damage. 



30 



"Beautiful Roses" can be recommended as a worth-while addi- 
tion to the Rose libraries of all discriminating collectors, and the price 
is exceedingly moderate. 

— Dogrose. 



♦ 



The earth was made 

For everyone; 
We share the same old stars, 

The same old sun. 
It doesn't matter 

The world is small. 
We grow the same roses 

After all. 

REGINALD ARKNELL 



31 



The Secret and Voluptuous Life 
of a Rose-Grower 1 

Hugh MagLennan 2 
Montreal, Quebec 

The moist, cool summer with intermittent washes of sunshine has 
been poor for grain and vacations, exasperating to tennis players and 
cruel to mothers who count on summer as a time when the children 
are out of the house. It has given the cicadas little to sing about, it 
has sent snails to the lawns and slugs to the lettuce, it has darkened 
the moon and ruined the haystacks for country lovers. But to one 
species of lovely life this moist summer has been the kindest I ever 
remember in this part of the world. Never have the roses been so 
good. 

Roses love sunshine and warmth, but soft nights and moist airs 
and a little sun are kindlier to them than steady sun and dry nights. 
Roses love a land like Ireland better even than Irishmen do, for they 
thrive there as Irishmen do not. This summer we have had Irish 
weather all around Montreal. So now, while the second blooming 
makes in the canes, is the time to wonder why the men who love 
roses do so with such a voluptuous devotion. 

They do so because roses are like women, like all sorts of women 
miraculously transformed into the abstracted and distilled essence of 
the ideal woman who vanishes at a touch. Like their prototypes, no 
two species of rose are ever precisely the same. Each bush moreover 
is always unpredictable, and from one season to the next its cultivator 
can never be sure what it will do. Red roses in all their varieties are 
brunettes in velvet gowns; the yellows are blondes; the pinks and 

IReprinted from Scotchman's Return and Other Essays by Hugh MacLennan by 
kind permission of the author and The Macmillan Company of Canada 
Limited. 

2Hugh MacLennan, well-known Canadian novelist, is Associate Professor of 
English at McGill University. 



32 



mixed varieties — by far the most numerous — are the women 
whose colouring and nature can be described by no single adjective, 
and some white roses are the impossibly pure snow queens of legend. 

So there they are with their variety of shades, textures, forms, 
characters and scents. Scent in a rose is like lovingkindness in a 
woman, texture her quality of understanding, and an hour in the 
life of a rose is like a year in the life of a woman after the former 
has been cut and the latter has known a man she loves. Therefore 
no one can hope to find an interesting rose in a florist's shop any more 
than he can expect to meet a beneficent woman in a night club. The 
florists should not include roses in their business, and I know several 
sensitive florists who feel on this point as I do myself. Commercial 
roses are for those who do not understand the genius of this flower: 
they are bred for the length of their stems and their formless 
uniformity, they are like show girls with long sturdy legs, matching 
bosoms and complexions, and an Atlantic City perfection. A man 
who buys a dozen long-stemmed roses, all identical, is like the con- 
vention executive who orders a dozen standardized girls to ensure 
the success of a banquet. 

But most amateur rose-growers, certainly if they are male, are 
suppressed voluptuaries, and the artists among them understand that 
nobody should cultivate too many roses at the same time. The 
millionaire with his rose-garden covering half an acre is as dull as 
the sultan with his harem of a thousand concubines. Hired gardeners 
know the inhabitants of the one, eunuchs of the other, and in each 
case the master wearies himself with an excess of plenty. The question 
of how many rose-bushes a man needs for his personal happiness 
depends on the man himself and on the intensity of his interest in the 
individuality of roses. But since the law and his own vitality limit 
all but exceptional males to one woman at a time, or at least to one 
woman at a moment, there is no reason why, in his cultivation of 
roses, a man should not sublimate his ambition for all different kinds 
of women into the possession of two or three dozen different bushes. 
But he must be willing to give himself to them; he must cultivate 
them personally; he must guard them against insects, blight, rodents, 
ice and in our part of the world against the most dangerous hazard 
of all, the warm sun of a false spring, and let the author of Lolita 
carefully consider the significance of this latter point. He must also 
give himself time to known each one of them personally, to explore 



33 



their characters, to verse himself in their endless variety of little 
ways. 

Roses have thorns (the point is trite but must be made) and 
they are ruthless to the flesh of any man who handles them carelessly 
or who gives them a casual pinch while pretending to be doing 
something else. They show jealousy to each other if they are crowded 
and have to fight for room in the sun, and when you are bedding 
down to care for one bush, another may claw you in the rear if you 
are careless. A great many roses have done this to me, but I have 
never blamed them, for it has been only through my own clumsiness 
that I have been scratched by one bush while paying attention to 
another. 

The more thoroughbred a rose is, the more emphatic or subtle 
is her personality. Each bush is subject to moods, and each proved 
species has its own special name, which reflects (like the names of 
their human counterparts) much more on the donors of the names 
than on the roses themselves. There is a rose called Better Times, 
and the professional rosier who supplied that name probably called 
his wife Toots. There is a special rose called Texas Centennial, 
another called after the Mojave desert, another, believe it or not, goes 
by the name of G.I. Joe. Quelle betise! 

To my taste the worst name of them all is President Herbert 
Hoover, for it interposes between the rose and the voluptuary one of 
the best-known physiognomies of the western world, one moreover 
which lacks any possible association with the spirit and grace of roses. 
A dahlia might have been called after Mr. Hoover, a dyed chrysan- 
themum or even a prize tomato plant, but not a rose. Without casting 
any aspersions on the political rectitude of the thirtieth President 
of the United States, I have to report that my first Herbert Hoover 
spent two years in my garden without showing a single blossom, that 
my second went wild and my third was chewed by mice in its first 
winter. Stubborn as any Republican in face of the hardest evidence, 
I kept on trying to make a Herbert Hoover grow and finally I suc- 
ceeded. In one season a bush actually bloomed, and a splendid rose 
it turned out to be — not supreme, not particularly subtle, not the 
kind a man would die for — but well turned, rather sumptuous, some- 
what like an Edwardian girl in her late twenties with a strawberry 
curl in her hair. 

I continue with this matter of names, for a bad name diminishes 



34 



the essence both of a rose and woman, while a good name may often 
define a character. If anyone wishes proof of this, let him consider 
the rose called Countess Vandal. The man who named her under- 
stood roses as Tolstoy understood women, for the Vandal with her 
long, cool, exquisite bud, her pale, coppery complexion like an 
Oriental queen's, ravishes the eye but cheats the soul. For she is 
almost scentless and in middle age she becomes draggled; she is la 
belle dame san merci among the roses. 

Also well named is Betty Uprichard, radiant and joyous in 
youth, full of girlish sparkle and excitement. On the day she is cut, 
Betty Uprichard is an Irish girl in love for the first time as she stands 
in the wind and sun with the light in her hair, and she gives out the 
clean fragrance of a rapture in which passion has no part. But life 
almost instantly becomes too much for her; she blows and fades so 
quickly she hurts the heart and her last hours are those of a woman 
who life is over at thirty. 

There are so many roses like her, and while I love them young 
I grieve for their destiny, which is predictable. One is Mrs. Van 
Rossem from Holland, who burst out of an ample bud like a russet- 
cheeked, full-bosomed country girl avid for life and loving. In youth 
her fragrance is so intense it can fill a garden, but she spends it as 
fast as she spends herself on the first oaf who sees her and takes her. 
In no time she is blowsy, a travesty of herself when she should be at 
her best, her faded petals wide open as they beg for an admiration 
she knows she has lost and can never regain. 

There are roses which resemble healthy, pretty, well brought-up 
girls who simply lack the understanding to become supremely 
beautiful. One of these is Johanna Hill, who reminds me of someone 
I knew in college who all my friends agreed was a nice, nice girl. At 
dances she never went out into cars to neck; she was kind to lonely 
freshmen and every Sunday you saw her going to church with her 
parents. She carried an ever-so-faint suggestion of a polite perfume 
behind her ears — at least so I guessed, though I never knew her 
well enough to be sure of this — and in her second year to college she 
got herself engaged to a man so silent he probably had lockjaw. He 
studied law and, of course, he went into corporation work; he never 
did anything wrong and he never did anything right, and in his home, 
the nice, nice girl faded quickly into a neglected housewife with three 



35 



children while the corporation man moved slowly upward from a 
Chevrolet to a Pontiac to a Buick. There he stopped. 

There are roses which resemble the buxom women of Rubens 
— warm and dewy, lusty rather than passionate, mothers of a 
sturdy race who never make trouble but stay full-bodied and full- 
coloured to the end. The Mrs. Barraclough is one; Madame Jules 
Bouche is another. Full-bodied also is the rose inappropriately called 
The Doctor, but her bosom is Italian rather than Nordic, and if you 
wish to find her prototype among women, Giorgione has painted her 
again and again. 

There are roses admired by sophisticates because they are tricked 
out with an unnatural novelty which makes them resemble the women 
you see moving slowly along Fifth Avenue at the trysting hour toward 
a rendezvous at the Pierre or Sherry-Netherlands with an account 
executive or a thrice-married broker from downtown. I cultivated 
one for several years and like her reasonably well, and her presence 
in the garden made an agreeable compensation for the days of my 
ignorance when I first went to New York and saw her prototypes in 
the Plaza at sunset and even envied the men who could afford them. 
She was the Contessa de Sastago. Her basic pink was slashed with a 
wild, incongruous blaze of yellow in one part of her bloom, and it 
gave the effect of a carefully contrived platinum lock in a head of 
brown hair. The Contessa had also a neat figure (as you might 
assume), and not a little staying power, but there was too much 
calculation in her character. Her personality was so contrived I never 
was able to penetrate to its secret, and indeed I suspected it might be 
a disappointment if I ever found it. After she died of black spot, I 
never tried to grow her again. 

There are roses — increasingly more of them every year — 
which resemble the big, sun-ripened girls who disport themselves on 
the beaches of southern California, drink an excess of orange juice 
and seem perfect until you get to know them: girls with faultless 
bosoms, waistlines and thighs, and only one limitation: they don't 
seem to mean much. Yet they are very pleasant to have around, all 
of them are friendly and they possess an advantage the great ones 
lack : a man doesn't mind giving them now and then to his friends. 

Everyone knows, I suppose (and if he does not know he is 
doomed to frustration) that it is the power to evoke poetic emotions 
which renders both women and roses unforgettable. After ten years 



36 



'CITY OF LEEDS' (floribunda) 
'Evelyn Fisoti X {'Spartan X 'Red Favourite) 
Raised by S. McGredy IV, N. Ireland 

TRIAL GROUND CERTIFICATE AND CERTIFICATE OF MERIT 1 96 
GOLD MEDAL I965 




'APRICOT NECTAR' (floribunda) 
Raised by E. S. Boerner, U.S.A. 

TRIAL GROUND CERTIFICATE AND CERTIFICATE OF MERIT 1 965 



oi experimenting, I can now say that most of the roses in my garden 
possess this power, at least to some degree. The Helen Traubel is one : 
a full, luscious pink, generous in her nature, she reproduces in no 
small degree the tones of the lady after whom she is named. Also 
there is Tallyho, who cannot help her absurd name, a dark, Latin 
lady (or possibly Jewish), who reminds me of a cello-player painted 
by Augustus John when he was a young man. This is a rose you do 
not learn in an evening or even in a month. She is so strong in her 
colouring, so individual, so proud in her bearing that you fear her a 
little, yet she is a true woman and a very exceptional one, being at 
once an aristocrat and intelligent, passionate and discriininating, very 
complex, for despite her ardency she is one whose heart is always 
ruled by her head. The Eclipse has the exciting quality of a natural 
ash-blonde who grows old without losing either her charm or her 
figure. The Forty-Niner (the second-worst name I have ever known 
applied to a rose) has a flat, textureless sheen on her under-petals 
while her upper surface is a rich, satiny scarlet. She makes me think 
of a husky tomboy who outgrows cokes and comics and basketball 
after she has known admiration and love, but somehow — somehow 
I am never quite certain that her maturity is permanent, or that if 
she were offered the choice of a coke or a Chateau Yquem, she might 
not prefer the former in her heart. 

A relatively new floribunda, disastrously named Fashion, is like 
a bevy of laughing, delightful girls who never grow old, for the 
salmon pink of her small but exquisite blossoms never fades until the 
petals fall, and though she is only a floribunda, her fragrance is as 
intensely mature as that of any of the full-grown hybrid teas but one. 
There are also a few old-fashioned girls I cherish and would not be 
without: the delicate, pearly-grey, pastel-pink Madame Butterfly 
whom our grandfathers adored, and that nobly enduring white rose, 
Frau Karl Drushki. Both remind me of Tennyson: the former a 
young girl who never went abroad without a chaperon, the latter a 
great lady who rode in carriages with a coachman up front in the 
days before anyone had heard of Freud. 

Men who love roses will differ among themselves about dozens 
of varieties, just as men who know music will differ in their affection 
for composers. But just as all men who understand music set Bach 
and Mozart in a special place at the very summit of their love, so do 
all rose-growers agree about two transcendent examples of the 

37 



species. One is dark and the other fair, and ( as of course you know) , 
their names are Crimson Glory and Peace. Beside these two queens 
even so exquisite a flower as Charlotte Armstrong is condemned to 
the role of a lady-in-waiting wearing a tiara and not a crown. These 
two roses are so celebrated it would be an impertinence to describe 
them in detail, the one with its texture of deep red velvet, the other 
with the hue of Homer's rose-fingered dawn, and literally so, since 
the pure, shining-pale gold of her petals is fringed with a delicately 
flushing line of pink when she is dawn-young. As one is the queen 
of the dark ladies, the other of the fair, each complements not only 
the tones of the other, but also the character. Crimson Glory is the 
most passionate rose in the world. She does not bestow her passion 
lightiy, nor throw it away, but she keeps both her essence and her 
loveliness the full length of her days. It is her supreme virtue that it 
is not until she has reached middle-age that her figure, her scent and 
her aid reach a full maturity. Milton has given her mood in the 
lines: 

Sometimes let gorgeous tragedy 
In sceptred pall come sweeping by! 

The Peace was bestowed upon us by a Frenchman descended 
from a line of rosiers who trace their craft all the way back to the 
French kings, and it was the Americans, not he, who called her 
Peace. Her creator's name for her was gloria dei and so I think of 
her always, for her passion, her nature and her essence are entirely 
spiritual. Untouchable and serene, dawn-like, she is not a queen 
but a goddess. 



I do not know that there has ever been a flower which so universally 
and constantly represents one idea — that of Love — as the Rose has 
done and still does. It is the emblem of true affection . . . 

HILDERIC FRIEND 



33 



Miniature Roses Yesterday, 

Today and Tomorrow 

Ralph S. Moore, Visalia, California 

Miniature roses have continued to grow in popularity during 
the past 30 years — especially within the past decade has their popu- 
larity grown by leaps and bounds. 

Known under the name of Rosa Rouletti, Rosa chinensis minima, 
Swiss Fairy Rose, the original miniature variety of our time, dis- 
covered in Switzerland in 1 9 1 8, became known in gardens throughout 
Europe and America during the late '20s and early '30s. This little 
rose pink variety under the hands of skilled breeders such as Jan de 
Vink, Pedro Dot and others, soon gave rise to numerous offspring. 
Among these were Tom Thumb, Baby Gold Star, etc. 

First among these was Tom Thumb (Peon in Europe) and in 
many ways the most important since it was destined to become the 
parent of much of the present day tribe of miniatures. 

In further crosses, Tom Thumb gaves rise to such popular minia- 
tures as Pixie, Red Imp, Cinderella, Baby Masquerade and numerous 
others. Tom Thumb has also played an important part in my own 
work. Although I have not used the variety as a direct parent except 
in the case of Zee (see Modern Roses VI) , it did serve as a most impor- 
tant key. 

The variety Zee, though never introduced, has played its part as 
the pollen parent of numerous miniatures such as Yellow Doll, Easter 
Morning, Bit o' Sunshine and very recendy, Debbie and Mary Adair. 

In addition, Zee was the pollen parent of the new group of ever- 
blooming miniature climbers. Among these are such varieties as Pink 
Cameo, Fairy Princess, Magic Wand, Little ShowofT and Climbing 
Jackie. 

Good usable parent varieties are not easy to come by. This is 
especially true of miniatures since sterility (especially female) is an 
ever-present problem (see All About Miniature Roses — Ralph S. 



39 



Moore, Diversity Books, Kansas City, Missouri, 1966; Available from 
the American Rose Society, 4048 Roselea Place, Columbus, Ohio) . It 
is true that some miniatures such as Rosa Rouletti, Tom Thumb, 
Oakington Ruby, New Penny and others set some seed hips but unfor- 
tunately in all too many cases the seeds produced are not fertile, and 
are produced sparingly. Hips more often than not contain but one seed 
(sometimes two or three) so the use of miniatures as seed parents is in 
most cases not too practical. 

The other approach is to use the miniature as pollen (male) 
parent, and in nearly all cases this has been my method. But here 
again one is limited since most miniatures produce little or no pollen. 
Many are so double that anthers are totally (or almost totally) lacking, 
hence no pollen. This narrows our choice of possible pollen parents 
down to a very few kinds. 

The original Rosa Rouletti has been one of these. But some of 
the offspring of such crosses are sometimes rather difficult to propagate 
from cuttings and often have more stiff brittle roots making potting of 
such rooted cuttings slower with more likelihood of root damage. For- 
tunately this is not always the case — for example, Tom Thumb. 

In Europe Perla de Alcanada and Perla de Montserrat have been 
used as pollen parents with considerable satisfaction. But for the most 
part, Tom Thumb has been more the favorite. 

To obtain the wide range of results from my own work other 
kinds have been employed. First was Zee (Carolyn Dean x Tom 
Thumb) which, as recounted earlier, I used to produce several white, 
cream, yellow and pink miniatures — also, the miniature climbers 
which inherited the ever-blooming climbing habit from Carolyn Dean 
( CI. polyantha ) . Of these, Magic Wand has proven to be almost liter- 
ally a ' 'magic wand' ' . 

Recent crosses using Magic Wand as pollen parent have pro- 
duced such miniatures as Baby Darling, Jeanie Williams, Jet Trail, 
Fringette, Beauty Secret, Toy Clown, Yellow Necklace, Red Wand 
— with others to come. 

Yet another line involved the use of Zee crossed on to a climbing 
red floribunda seedling (seedling #21-48-5). This red seedling 
floribunda has in its ancestry such famous roses as Sister Therese 
(H.T.), Wilhelm (sister to Eva, one parent of Pinocchio), Red 
Ripples and others. Directly from the cross of #21-48-5 x Zee came 
Mona Ruth and Candy Cane (only striped miniature). But of even 



40 



more importance, among the lot was a red seedling which when crossed 
on to another seedling, #0-47-19 (Rosa zvichuraiana x Floradora) 
produced Eleanor, New Penny and others. Several of these, including 
Eleanor and New Penny, are proving to be important advances for 
breeding purposes. 

Yet another source of interesting miniatures has come about 
from an initial cross which I made several years ago. Oakington Ruby 
crossed with Floradora (pollen) produced a dark red seedling which 
when used as the pollen parent on #0-47-19 produced Dian, Little 
Buckaroo, Westmont, Bobolink and others. Dian and Little Buckaroo 
have become widely grown. Little Buckaroo is among the most popu- 
lar kinds now being grown in Europe. In turn, when Little Buckaroo 
was back crossed on its mother parent we obtained such miniatures 
as Lollipop and Baby Ophelia. 

With all this breeding background and the materials now avail- 
able we can reasonably hope for not only more variety but most impor- 
tant, the refinement of plants, flowers and colors. It is true that at the 
present time many varieties exhibit undesirable habits and degrees of 
coarseness in plant and foliage. These are accoutrements of growing 
up — coming of age as it were. This has been the awkward stage dur- 
ing which much has been happening of a more or less disturbing 
nature. Now the job is to bring about, by refining what we have, those 
improved, more desirable varieties for tomorrow. 



There's a garden, there's a garden, 

An island of repose: 
And the only amorous occupant 

Is an old pink climbing rose. 

JOHN CRICHTON 



41 



Some All-Canadian Roses 



Fred Blakeney 
Victoria, B.C. 

Having been asked by our Editor to write an article on roses that have 
been hybridized in Canada, I dutifully submit this effort. At first I 
thought I would follow a chronological plan beginning with the 
earliest recorded truly Canadian rose down to the latest, but I had to 
abandon that idea because some of our hybridizers have been produc- 
ing roses over a number of years. Such being the case, the result would 
have been a hodgepodge as far as the originators were concerned. I, 
therefore, have adopted the plan of first giving the Canadian 
hybridizer's name and then following with his originations. 

H. M. Eddie & Sons Ltd., 4100 S.W. Marine Drive, Van- 
couver 13, B.C., have produced far more H.T. roses of Canadian 
origin than anyone else in Canada. They have been hybridizing for 
over thirty years and have produced eighteen roses in B.C. as follows 
in alphabetical order : 

"Ardelle", H.T., introduced in 1957, has a high-centre, fragrant 
creamy white bloom. This rose is doing very well in the U.S.A. 
and England. 

"Burnaby", H.T., introduced in 1954, has a high centre, and is a 
canary yellow at the centre with the outer petals cream. It is a 
fine exhibition rose and wins many prizes at shows. It was 
awarded the National Rose Society (British) gold medal in 1954 
and the Portland (U.S.A.) gold medal in 1957. 

"Eddie's Advent", H.T., introduced in 1938. It is a large, double, 
pale buff, tipped pink, fading to almost white. 

"Eddie's Cream", F., is a large, double, fragrant cream. This rose 
has also been introduced in Britain by R. Harkness & Co. in 
1956. 

"Eddie's Crimson", Shrub. (Donald Prior x R. moyesii.) A large 
shrub, 8 to 1 0 feet high, and covered with blood red blooms, but 
it is only once-blooming. Introduced in 1956. 



42 



"Flaming Sunset", H.T. Introduced in 1948. A "McGredy's Sunset" 
sport. Jackson & Perkins of the U.S.A. had a similar sport but 
Eddie & Sons were a year earlier. 

"Gordon Eddie", H.T. This fine rose was introduced in 1949. It is 
large with a high centre, fragrant, a deep apricot with lighter 
edges. The colour of this rose is different from other apricot roses 
and is especially fine in the fall. It received the National gold 
medal in 1950. 

"Jeanie", H.T. Introduced in Canada and U.S.A. in 1958. It is very 
double with about 66 petals, and fragrant, cream to pink blooms. 

"Mrs. H. M. Eddie". Introduced in 1943, another fine exhibition 
rose. It is creamy white passing to purest white. The climbing 
form of this rose was introduced by Eddie's a year later as a 
sport of the bush form. 

"Picturesque", H.T., is a seedling of "Mrs. H. M. Eddie" crossed 
with "Mrs. Sam McGredy" and was introduced in 1950. It 
is a fragrant pale pink with pronounced red veinings. 

"Poly Prim", F., a fine yellow floribunda something like "Goldi- 
locks" but a better shaped plant. It was awarded a gold medal 
by the National Rose Society in 1 954. 

"Rosemary Eddie", F., a lovely floribunda with small H.T. -shaped 
pink blooms; growth somewhat similar to "Little Darling" but 
a little less vigorous. Introduced in 1956. 

"Royal Visit", H.T., introduced in 1939, has stood the test of time. 
It is double, a deep tangerine-orange, reverse coral passing to 
apricot. Foliage is dark, leathery and glossy. 

"Ruby Talisman", H.T., a sport of Talisman but more shapely. It 
is a rich, ruby red with reflexed petals. Introduced in 1935. 

"The Mountie", F., has medium-sized, semi-double blooms of bright 
cherry red. The trusses are very large and plentiful. The foliage is 
glossy, leathery and of a light green colour. It was put into com- 
merce in 1949. 

"Yellow Talisman", H.T. "Talisman" has thrown numerous sports 
and this is another of them. It is pale, sulphur yellow and was 
introduced in 1 935. 

Now last, but definitely not the least, is a new Eddie origination 
named "Park Royal'. It is a floribunda and it will be available in 
1967. We will have to wait until the 1966-1967 catalogue comes out 
for a description of this rose. It should be a good floribunda because 



43 



Mr. Eddie has been working on floribundas and this is his choice 
out of many worthwhile seedlings. 

The Federal Department of Agriculture Experimental Station 
at Morden, Manitoba, has been carrying on a rose-breeding pro- 
gramme for over 42 years. It is now under the direction of Mr. H. F. 
Harp, the object in view being to develop a garden rose that will 
survive the cold winters of the Prairies. Furthermore, it aims to 
develop winter-hardy roses having the repeat-blooming characteristics, 
Hybrid Tea form, fragrance, good plant habit with disease-resistant 
foliage. This is quite a programme and one which of necessity must 
take a number of years to achieve. However, they are well on their 
way and have produced the following varieties: 
"Prairie Sailor", shrub, introduced in 1946, is the result of crossing 
"Dr. W. Van Fleet", "Turkes Rugosa Samling" and R. spino- 
sissima altaica. It is single, a golden yellow deeply edged bright 
red. The plant is vigorous to six feet and blooms profusely but is 
non-recurrent. It is, however, hardy on the Prairies. 
"Prairie Wren", shrub, also introduced in 1946, has a similar pedigree 
except that "Ophelia" has been used instead of "Dr. W. Van 
Fleet". It has large, semi-double, rich pink non-recurrent blooms 
in profusion and is hardy on the Prairies. 
"Prairie Youth", shrub, introduced in 1948, has a very involved 
pedigree, consisting of "Ross Rambler", "Dr. W. Van Fleet", 
R. suffvlta, "Turkes Rugosa Samling", and R. spinosissima 
altaica. It is semi-double, a slighdy fragrant pure salmon pink in 
clusters. It is very hardy, grows to six feet, and blooms inter- 
mittently. 

"Prairie Charm", shrub, introduced in 1959, is a cross between the 
above - mentioned "Prairie Youth" and "Prairie Wren". It 
grows to a height of four feet, with light green foliage that is 
resistant to blackspot. Flowers are semi-double, bright salmon- 
coral, produced freely but not recurrent. It is hardy on the 
Prairies. 

"Prairie Dawn", shrub, also introduced in 1959, is a result of crossing 
"Prairie Youth", "Ross Rambler", "Dr. W. Van Fleet" and 
R. spinosissima altaica. This one grows to a height of 5 feet and 
is of upright habit. The foliage is dark green and glossy, while the 
flowers are 2 to 25/2 inches in diameter, of a double, glowing 
pink with no trace of magenta or fading. It blooms from early 



44 



July and intermittently throughout the summer on the current 
season's wood, and it is hardy on the Prairies. 

"Prairie Maid", shrub, introduced in 1959, is of compact growth up 
to 4 feet in height. It is the progeny of ("Ophelia" x "Turkes 
Rugos Samling") x R. spinosissima altaica. The foliage is of 
good texture and resistant to blackspot. The flowers are double 
with 25 petals and petaloids, cream and sweedy scented. Hardy 
on the Prairies, it blooms in July with a few blooms later. 

"Number 6111". This is the latest and it has not yet been named. 
It is a promising nitida hybrid and so should have brilliant foliage 
in the fall. 

Mr. Georges Bugnet of Legal, Alberta, began hybridizing roses 
over 25 years ago. As a matter of fact, he wrote an article about his 
work on breeding roses which appeared in the American Rose Society's 
Annual for 1 941 . A good deal of his biography is in West of the Fifth 
published by the Lac Ste. Anne Historical Society. 

His breeding grounds at Rich Valley have been acquired by the 
Alberta Government and bear the name of "The Bugnet Plantation 
Historical Site". He has two registered roses to his credit : 
"Lac La Nonne, shrub, introduced in 1950, its parentage being R. 
rugosa plena x R. acicularis. The bud is pointed and deep red. 
The flowers are of medium size, 2 to 3 inches, semi-double, very 
deep pink (almost red) and fragrant. It is a vigorous grower to 
7-8 feet, blooms in August and is hardy. 
"Therese Bugnet", shrub, introduced in 1950, is the progeny of four 
species and "Betty Bland" : i.e. (R. acicularis x R. rugosa kamt- 
chatica) x (R. amblyotis x R. rugosa plena) x "Betty Bland". 
The flowers are large (4 inches), double (30-40 petals), and 
open a fragrant red passing to pale pink. The plant is very 
vigorous and new shoots reach 5-6 feet in three months. It 
blooms on old wood from mid- June till frost. Very hardy. 
Mr. Percy Wright of Saskatoon, Sask., must be considered one of 
the foremost hybridizers of species and near species roses in North 
America. He has been working on these roses for many years and 
knows the reactions of various hardy roses when crossed with species 
roses. 

His objective has always been to produce worthwhile garden 
rose that are hardy enough to withstand the extremely low tempera- 
tures of the Prairies in winter. 



45 



Of course, H.T.'s, Floribundas and Climbers are far too tender 
to be grown on the Prairies without absolute protection, and that is an 
almost impossible task. When it is realized that the frost penetrates to 
six feet or more in the open ground, it will be readily understood what 
a difficult task Mr. Wright has taken on. However, he is a very keen 
hybridizer in the true sense of the word, for he has been crossing species 
and has been successful in producing and putting into commerce over 
thirty of his own originations that can stand the cold winters of the 
Prairies with only snow protection. True, they only have their one 
burst of bloom in early summer, but there are many gardens on the 
Prairies that are colourful as far as roses are concerned as the result of 
Mr. Wright's work. 

Here is a list of Mr. Wright's originations in chronological order 
of introduction : 

1935 "Alice" has soft pink, semi-double blooms. 

1936 "Mary L. Evans", semi-double, deep rich pink. 
1938 ' 'Hansette' ' , semi -double red. 

1940 "FeHcity", small pink. 

1940 "Little Betty", double, small pale pink. 

1943 "Golden Altai", single, cream flushed yellow. 

1943 "Harison's Hardy", semi-double, flushed yellow at centre. 

1944 "Moose Range", red with bluish cast. 

1 945 "Dorothy Evans", pale pink. 

1946 "Bertha", single, delicate pink on erect stems, somewhat like 
a hollyhock. 

1946 "Loch Lomond", double, golden yellow. 

1946 "Marion Gyneth", large, semi-double deep pink, edges lighter. 

1946 "Melanie", semi-double, deep red, foliage reddish. 

1946 "Royal Robe", large, semi-double, dark crimson, flushed 
purple. 

1947 "Ruth", red, a more double form of "Alika" (seedling) . 

1948 "Aylsham", flowers, large, double, deep pink. 

1950 "Helen Bland", semi-double, rose pink, with deeper center in 
small clusters. Stems reddish brown and thornless. 

1950 "Yellow Altai", small golden flowers in clusters. 

1951 "Victory Year", medium size, semi-double, clear pink. 
1953 "Augusta", medium size, semi-double, rose pink. 

1953 "Musician", a very unexpected colour for such a hardy rose. 
It is a bicolour red and yellow, double, and of good size. 



46 



1 955 "Master David", double, salmon pink, yellow at base of petals, 
clusters. Repeats bloom in fall. 

1956 "Bonnie", same parentage as Aylsham but taller and more 
vigorous. 

1956 "Eureka", small, semi-double white flowers in clusters. 

While the above is far from a complete list of Mr. Wright's 
originations, it does indicate what a dedicated species rose hybridist he 
is. The fund of knowledge of species hybrids' reactions, when cross 
pollinated, he has gained is, in my opinion, second to none. 

The John H. Dunlop & Son Nursery of Toronto has originated 
six H.T. roses, and were probably the first nursery to put Canadian- 
originated roses on the market. At least, they were the first recorded. 
Their first introduction was a tea rose named "White Bougere" in 
1898. Then Mowed five H.T.'s: "Mrs. Henry Winnett" (1917), 
"Frank Dunlop" (1920), "Canadian Jubilee" (9127), "Phantasy" 
(1927), "Red Beauty" (1929). Some of these roses may still be 
around. Mr. Dunlop died in 1930. 

The Central Experimental Farm at Ottawa, as may be expected, 
has done considerable rose breeding over a number of years. Dr. 
William Saunders started this programme with "Grace", a hybrid 
rugosa in 1892, followed by "Agnes", also a hybrid rugosa, in 1900. 
After the passing of Dr. Saunders, the rose breeding programme was 
taken up by Miss Isabella Preston and she produced nineteen hybrid 
species. Nearly all are shrub roses with one burst of bloom in June, 
but there are three climbers: "Agassiz" (1930), "Langford" 
( 1 930 ) , and "Patricia Macoun" (1923). 

Mr. Robert Simonet of South Edmonton, Alta., is working for 
hardy roses in a large way. He raises from 2,000 to 4,000 seedlings 
each year. 

His object is to produce everblooming H.T. type roses that will 
survive Prairie winters with protection. Not only would such roses 
be of great benefit to the Prairies, but they would be most welcome 
to the milder climates, particularly if their form equalled the average 
H.T. and the foliage was disease-resistant. 

He has already produced some promising varieties and, without 
doubt, will be heard from in the very near future. 

Mr. A. J. Porter of Parkside, Sask., Mr. Robert Erskine of 
Carlos, Alta., and Edward Robinson of Wawanesa, Man., have each 



47 



been hybridizing independently and all have several originations to 
their credit. 

The Dale Nurseries of Toronto originated three Hybrid Teas: 
"Lady Canada 55 ( 1927), "Lady Willingdon 55 (1928), and "Bonny 
Bess 55 (1929). This nursery passed out of business so no more new 
roses were produced. 

Now we come to the Dean of Canadian Hybridizers in the 
person of Dr. Frank L. Skinner of Dropmore, Manitoba, who has 
been hybridizing roses and other plants for over sixty years. His 
first recorded origination was a cross between R. acicvlaris, an 
extremely hardy species rose found probably nearer the Arctic Circle 
than any other rose, and R. spinosissima, another very hardy species. 
This was introduced in 1925 and named "Larry Burnett 55 . It has 
large (3^2 inches in diameter) semi-double, cupped, very fragrant, 
blush-white blooms, with the centre being deeper. The plant is 
bushy and vigorous, a profuse bloomer, and is very hardy. From then 
on he has produced many worthwhile hardy roses that withstand the 
Prairie winters. Probably the best known is: 
"Betty Bland 55 , a cross between the species rose "Blanda 5 ' and a 
Hybrid Perpetual. The flowers are double, fragrant, a deep 
rose pink. The canes are red when young. The rose was intro- 
duced in 1926. Other originations followed in succession, the 
chief ones being : 

"Wassagarning 55 , (R. rugosa x R. acicvlaris) x "Gruss and Teplitz 55 , 

a June flowering shrub, 3 feet high. 
"Dorothy Fowler 55 (R. rugosa x R. acicvlaris) x R. spinosissima. 

Very fragrant clear pink, semi-double in June. 
"George Will 55 , R. rugosa x R. acicvlaris x garden roses. 3 inch 

double, flat, fragrant, deep pink flowers in clusters; typical 

Rugosa foliage ; height 3-4 feet, all summer bloom. 
"John McNab 55 , R. rugosa kamtchatica x R. beggeriana. Double 

pink. Profuse midseason bloom, sometimes continuing later. 
"Mrs. John McNab 55 , R. beggeriana x R. rugosa. Flowers very 

double, fragrant white. Blooms over a long period but is not 

recurrent. Few thorns. 
"Will Godfrey 55 , Hybrid Perpetual x "Altaians 55 . Flowers of Hybrid 

Perpetual form and blooms all summer. 
"Isa Murdock 55 , R. spinosissima x double white spinosissima. Double 

white, thorny. Very free bloom over a long period. 



48 



"Dropmore Yellow", R. foetida x R. spinosissima hispida. Rich 
yellow with glossy foliage. 

"Haidee", R. laxa hybrid. Flowers large, double, light pink, with 
cream centre. Height six feet with non-recurrent bloom. 

"Altaians", R. altaica x R. acicularis. Flowers single, white. Pro- 
fuse, non-recurrent, bloom. 

"Suzanne", R. laxa hybrid. Flowers very double, pale coral pink. 
Blooms freely all season. 

"Will Alderman", Rugosa hybrid x Rugosa hybrid. Flowers double, 
fragrant, deep rose pink. Flowers all season. 

"Butterball", R. spinosissima hispida hybrid with creamy yellow 
flowers and prickly arching branches. Height 6 feet, non- 
recurrent bloom. 

"Skinner's Rambler", R. maximowicziana x unknown. Flowers small, 
single, slightly fragrant in pale pink clusters of 10-40 blooms. 
Very vigorous climber (20 feet annually). Profuse bloom. 

"Albion", R. laxa hybrid. Flowers white, double, recurrent bloom. 
Now a little about my own limited endeavour to breed a rose 

of H.T. quality with a little more hardiness than our present H.T.'s 

have. 

In 1952 I crossed "Dr. Merkeley" with R. virginiana and 
produced two seedlings. One was of prostrate growth and typical 
virginiana glossy foliage and single blooms. The other developed into 
a large shrub 8 feet high with "Dr. Merkeley" foliage and double 
blooms, which were utterly useless as the petals were so papery they 
all balled. However, I crossed this with the H.T. "Gretel Greul" and 
got a similar plant with better blooms but still quite useless. I crossed 
this with "Crimson Glory" and got another tall shrub, but with 
blooms of much better form that did not ball. This plant has proved 
to be very interesting in that it has produced continuous blooming 
seedlings when crossed with some H.T.'s but not with most H.T.'s, 
and I now have a nice seedling from it that appears to be immune 
to mildew, in that it was planted very close to a H.T. that was 
smothered in mildew — the branches actually intermingling — and 
yet it never developed any. The plant is robust and branching and 
all blooms come singly. They open blush but fade to white when 
fully open. They are of double H.T. form but not of exhibition 
standard. I am very pleased with this seedling as it has taken me 14 
years to develop, but I wonder if there is any hardiness left in it. Time 



49 



will tell. My rose "Miss Canada" is now known all across Canada, 
so it needs no description from me. That it has given me the greatest 
hybridizing thrill of my life is an understatement, and I truly am 
gratified at the way the people of Canada have taken to it. I have 
also another rose on the market which I have named "Blakeney's 
Red". The foliage is dull and so is not so attractive as the foliage of 
"Miss Canada". It is a brilliant red currant colour and can produce 
at times some wonderful blooms. I am still hybridizing as a hobby. All 
the ground that I have is a city lot on which my house stands, so my 
hybridizing endeavours are very limited, but I am always hopeful of 
more successes. 



Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, 

Old Time is still a- flying; 
And this same flower that smiles today 

Tomorrow will be dyfoig. 

ROBERT HERRIGK 



50 



That Wonderful Year 1867 



Theo Mayer, Editor 

Few single years in history have been so productive of such interest- 
ing and far-reaching developments as that one which we can now 
look back on after a century has elapsed. 1867 was indeed an annus 
mirabilis. It saw the end of Napoleon Ill's dream of a Mexican 
Empire, when the ill-fated Maximilian was abandoned to Juarez 
and met his death before a firing squad. 1867 also witnessed 
Seward's Folly, the American Secretary of State purchasing, much 
to the indignation or laughter of many of his countrymen, a large 
chunk of ice and snow from Russia for $7.2 million. The "chunk" 
was, of course, Alaska, and the strategic importance of the purchase 
is now evident to all. In England in 1867 the Second Reform Bill 
was passed, marking another step forward towards the full enfran- 
chisement of the population. When the British North American Act 
became law on July 1st of that year, a vision, shared by a hard- 
drinking Scot and his colleagues, became a reality, as a new nation 
was born in North America. And over in France, obscured by these 
world-shaking developments, an event that was to prove of the 
greatest significance to rose growers occurred: J. B. Guillot intro- 
duced under the name La France the first Hybrid Tea 1 . 

La France marked a milestone in rose development in a century 
which had already seen remarkable progress. Before the turn of the 
nineteenth century nearly all garden roses bloomed only once. The 
old Gallicas, Centifolias, Albas, Damasks, etc., while rich in frag- 
rance, lacked that remontancy and form which we have come to 
insist on in roses. When trade opened with China in the late 1 700's, 
a great change took place, for ship masters brought back with them 
Chinese roses, and these, crossed with existing types, produced during 
the first half of the nineteenth century the Noisettes, Bourbons, 

*La France's claim to be the first H.T. has often been disputed and, it must be 
admitted, cannot be proved. However, the Editor accepts the view of most 
rosarians and accords La France the place of honour. 



51 



Hybrid Chinas, and Hybrid Perpetuals. This last class, in particular, 
became very popular, and even today some varieties such as Mrs. 
John Laing, Ulrich Brunner, and Frau Karl Drushki are to be 
found in gardens. However, the Hybrid Perpetuals left much to be 
desired; the blooms lacked the high centres we have come to admire, 
and, more important, the class was really misnamed, for its progeny 
is anything but perpetual, the blooms in most cases recurring only 
sparsely in September after the first flowering in June. A new type 
was needed, one that would be of good form and give flowers more 
or less continuously from June till frost. The Hybrid Teas, heralded 
by La France, saw the attainment of this goal. 

While the parentage of La France has never been substantiated, 
it is generally believed that Guillot obtained the first Hybrid Tea by 
crossing the Hybrid Perpetual Mme. Victor Verdier with the Tea 
Mme. Bravy. The resultant rose was a silvery pink, with the reverse 
side of the petals a brighter pink. The double flowers were large, and, 
as befitting the prototype of the Hybrid Tea class, the buds were 
long pointed. Not the least outstanding of the characteristics of this 
rose was its sweet fragrance which makes it valuable even today in 
a scented garden. It has been used to effect in such a garden for the 
blind, which was developed in Brighton, England, during the 1950's. 

After the advent of La France, the Hybrid Teas made steady 
progress. The class was officially recognized as a distinct one by the 
National Rose Society in 1893, and, by the end of the century, its 
representatives had begun to rival the Hybrid Perpetuals in popu- 
larity. In 1900 Pernet-Ducher introduced his famous Solei d'Or with 
its R. foetida blood, and from this developed the wonderful yellow, 
flame, and orange Hybrid Teas, which gave a distinct fillip to the 
class. During the twentieth century the march of the Hybrid Teas 
has been steady and unchecked, each year wimessing the introduc- 
tion of more than a score of new varieties. Today the Hybrid 
Perpetuals are all but forgotten; it is the Hybrid Teas which now 
dominate the rose world both in the garden and on the show bench. 

Unlike such great parent Hybrid Teas as Ophelia and Peace, 
La France has proved to be a comparative failure as a seed or pollen 
parent. Her descendants are few, and, among them, only one or two 
have been of any real merit. But, like the nineteenth-century 
pioneers and empire builders who were too busy to bother about their 



52 



families, La France will be remembered for herself alone and not 
for her issue. 

One hundred years have elapsed since John A. Macdonald saw 
the birth of Confederation; one hundred years likewise have passed 
since Jean-Baptiste Guillot introduced his precious seedling. As 
Canadians, let us all join in the festivities and celebrations that mark 
our centennial year; as rose growers, let us pause for a moment to 
pay respect to La France, the prototype of a class which has made 
our hobby so stimulating and worthwhile. 



Pour se sentir vraimmt bien, 

II faut un joli jar din; 
Belles roses — beaux jar dins, 

Pas de roses pauvre jar din! 

LOUIS CORNUZ 



53 



Rose Culture in Canada 
at Confederation 

Harold C. Cross 

Bale d'Urfe, Quebec 

As our country approaches the Centennial celebration of Confedera- 
tion, it is to be expected that greatly increased attention should be 
given to the Canada of the 1860's, including the political, social, 
industrial and agricultural developments of the period that culmin- 
ated in our national unification. The conditions under which people 
lived and the forces then in operation working towards political 
unity, all become matters of intense interest to the present generation. 

Even though a relatively minor aspect of Canadian culture in 
that period, gardening and particularly rose-growing, are surely 
natural subjects for investigation on the part of rose enthusiasts of 
today. We wonder: what types of roses were available, which 
varieties proved most suitable for Canadian conditions, how and 
where were rose plants obtained? The purpose of this sketch is to 
provide some of the facts and background material which will help 
us better to understand gardening conditions as they existed, and the 
stage of development which rose culture had reached at Con- 
federation. 

ROSES IN EARLY CANADA 

The history of the rose in Canada is almost as old as the settle- 
ment of the country. The old French roses: gallica, damask, and 
centifolia were brought to this country by the early settlers from 
France. There is evidence that these were grown in many seigneury 
gardens along the St. Lawrence River. R. W. Oliver assures us 
that there were roses in the garden of the Grey Nuns Hospital at 
Quebec as early 1690 1 1 Hochelaga Depicta contains a map of 
Montreal made in 1759. Within the old fortified settlement on the 
banks of the river there is depicted in remarkable detail a series of 



54 



gardens related to the various ecclesiastical institutions, including 
those of the Recollet Fathers, the Jesuits, the Seminary of St. Sulpice, 
the Hotel Dieu and others, as well as a few gardens belonging to 
individuals, such as the Governor de Vaudreuil. Just outside and 
north of the fortifications, was located an extensive private garden, 
the property of M. de Linieres 2 . Remnants of the same Seminary 
gardens, adjoining Notre Dame Church, still existed at the time of 
Confederation. 

FURTHER SETTLEMENT BRINGS ADDITIONAL ROSES 

After the fall of New France in 1760 an increasing number of 
colonists and traders from Great Britain arrived in Canada; already 
quite a number of settlers had moved north into Nova Scotia from 
New England; later still, following the revolution of the American 
Colonies, there was a considerable influx of United Empire Loyalists 
from the border States of the new Union into eastern Canada. 
Through the years many of the newcomers from the British Isles or 
New England 3 brought with them a love of gardening; some came 
from communities where the rose was a favourite flower, and of 
course, rose plants or cuttings were among the items brought from 
the old homes to the new; these roses in turn multiplied and were 
shared with neighbours and other members of the families. Rose- 
growing thus became an accepted element of the Canadian way of 
life. 

In my own garden we have a treasured rose bush which descends 
in direct line from a rose brought to Canada well over a century 
ago. The lady who kindly donated the plant tells the story: "My 
grandmother brought a rose bush to Montreal from her home in 
Antrim in 1848, and while at sea the ship in which she was sailing 
lost its rudder in a storm, and the voyage lasted three months, during 
which time the rose was keep alive with the share of rationed drinking 
water allotted to Mrs ." The hint of adventure and self- 
sacrifice in this incident suggests something of what was often involved 
in the determination by these settlers to bring along some of the "finer 
things of life" from the homeland to their new homes. 

TOWN LIFE PERMITS GARDENING 

Susanna Moodie concluded her volume Roughing it in the 
Bush, published in 1852, with these words: "If these sketches should 



55 



prove the means of deterring one family from sinking their property, 
and shipwrecking all their hopes, by going to reside in the backwoods 
of Canada, I shall consider myself amply repaid for revealing the 
secrets of the prison-house, and feel that I have not toiled and 
suffered in the wilderness in vain." There is no doubt that Mrs. 
Moodie's grim picture of the frontier in the middle part of the nine- 
teenth century is largely true. However, there was a pleasanter side 
to Canadian society in this period — life in the cities and towns such 
as Quebec, Montreal, Kingston, Toronto and elsewhere. 

The published correspondence of the family of the Bishop of 
Quebec, about 1849, gives a glimpse into home life of the times. 
Bishop Mountain's daughters were both keen gardeners. At Lennox- 
ville, his daughter Harriet, married to Jasper Nicholls, Principal of 
Bishop's College, grew St. George's roses and red phlox, we are told. 
At Quebec, daughter Kate cared for the garden at Bishopscourt, 
which contained morning glory, sweet peas and golden poppy. Kate 
was anxious that Harriet should ask Mrs. Nicholls, Senior, to send 
some seeds from England for the two gardens. She wrote "all the 
gentiemen in Quebec who keep nice gardens import their seeds from 
England". 

It would seem this request was unnecessary, for in 1849, Wm. 
Lyman and Co. advertised in the Montreal Witness: "The under- 
signed having received their usual supplies of fresh garden seeds from 
London via Boston 4 (the port of Montreal being closed in winter!) 
are prepared to execute orders for seeds with care and promptitude." 

Richard Starke, an elderly resident of Montreal, wrote in 1897 
a fascinating description of the gardens he had personally visited and 
enjoyed in his youth, located in what was then "the country" and 
later became the suburbs of the city 5 . He tells of "Temple Grove"> 
from 1837 to 1865 the summer residence of the Hon. Mr. Justice 
John S. McCord, which was widely known for its beautifully laid 
out grounds, featuring a special wild flower collection, rustic bridge, 
summer-house, espalier roses, shrubs and perennials. It was situated 
on Cote des Neiges Road, almost exactly where the present General 
Hospital stands. The ample slopes of Mount Royal and the rolling 
hills of the Island were used to advantage during the middle decades 
of last century, in establishing literally dozens of spacious residential 
properties featuring beautiful gardens and orchards. 

56 



NURSERIES TO MEET THE SITUATION 



In the early Forties, James Dougall had established a widely- 
known Rosebank Nursery at Amherstburg, Canada West, and 
regularly advertised in the Montreal Witness, published by his 
brother John Dougall. In 1 849 he offered, in addition to flowering 
shrubs, fruit trees of many sorts, tulip bulbs, dahlias and paeonies, 
"the finest varieties of June, Moss, Bourbon, Hybrid Perpetuals, 
Noisette, Bengal and Tea Roses, at very low prices". Undoubtedly 
these were imported from Great Britain, and propagated by budding. 
As an added "customer service", the Montreal Dougall maintained a 
large garden at the top of Mountain Street, where plants raised at 
Amherstburg, could be seen in bloom and ordered, "before eight 
o'clock in the morning' ' . 

A certain Dexter D'Everardo seems to have conducted a 100- 
acre nursery in Welland County as early as 1837, which eventually 
became the Fonthill Nurseries of more recent days. 

About 1855 D. W. Beadle operated a large nursery at St. 
Catherines; W. Holton of Hamilton and George Leslie near 
Toronto owned nurseries; all advertised roses for sale in current 
periodicals. A large firm at Rochester, N.Y. did a considerable 
business throughout Upper Canada. Customs requirements evidently 
did not interfere with this trade. There is ample evidence that there 
were many nurseries at the time, available to meet the increasing 
demands for garden materials. 

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES AND EXHIBITIONS 

Nothing contributed more to the development of agriculture 
and horticulture in Canada during the mid-century period, than the 
organization of numerous county agricultural societies and particu- 
larly of a Provincial Society. We find Essex County organized such 
a society about 1 844, and their Fall Fair became an annual event of 
great community interest. The first Provincial Exhibition was held 
in Upper Canada in 1846, with $1600 offered in prizes and 1150 
entries. By 1868 this event had grown to the extent that 6620 
entries were attracted, with $13,304 in prizes. 

The railroad-building boom in both Upper and Lower Canada 
in the 1850's resulted in a network of rail lines crisscrossing the 
Province, from Sarnia to Riviere du Loup. This undoubtedly made 
communications much simpler than in the stage coach and propeller 

57 



boat period of travel. Agriculture, along with other aspects of com- 
munity life, rapidly progressed in consequence. 

These agricultural bodies naturally gave their greatest attention 
to the improvement in production and quality of grains, live stock, 
fruits and vegetables, with flowers definitely holding a minor posi- 
tion. However, the number of classes in the Provincial Exhibition 
for flowers gradually increased, usually in the form of "best collection 
of", and by 1865 there were 24 different flower classes listed in the 
show. Local horticultural societies were also on the increase; in 1863 
we read news of the Toronto Gardeners' Improvement Society, and 
in 1867 the annual report of the Toronto Horticultural Society 
included reference to the Horticultural Gardens maintained by the 
Society for the benefit and enjoyment of the citizens 6 . 

THE ROSE IN COMPETITION 

We find no special mention of roses in competition until the 
Provincial Exhibition at Cobourg in 1855 7 . That year, while there 
was no class specially for roses, we learn that a special prize was 
awarded to Ellwanger and Barry, a nursery-exhibitor from Rochester, 
N.Y. for an exhibit of "50 varieties of roses". In 1857 at Kingston, 
H. Girouard of Hamilton, was awarded a prize of five shillings for 
"hybrid roses", and ten shillings special prize for a "collection of 
roses, 70 kinds" — no small accomplishment if he was an amateur 
grower, even today! Sir Edmund Head the Governor, paid an 
official visit to the show ; the Baron de Longueuil was President of the 
Society that year, and an exhibitor for several years. 

The Provincial prize list of 1859 included a class for "best 
collection of hybrid perpetual roses, not less than 12 blooms", which 
was won by the same H. Girouard already mentioned; W. Lunn of 
Montreal secured second, and John Gray of Toronto third. The last- 
mentioned was a keen competitor, as he won first prize in the same 
class five years later, and also an extra prize for a collection of 
Noisette, Tea and Bourbon roses. It is of interest that in 1866 there 
was a class "best two roses of any one variety", which is the first 
reference to variety specifically. By 1868, the class for at least 12 
hybrid perpetuals required these to be named, and "three roses of 
any one variety" became a new class. These were indications of a 
growing interest in rose exhibiting. We note also in 1866 a class "for 

58 



best floral arrangement or design", possibly the first occasion in 
Canada of a competition in flower arrangements ! 

In Lower Canada, gardening interest was equally keen. During 
the visit of the Prince of Wales to Canada in 1860, chiefly for the 
purpose of opening the new Victoria bridge across the St. Lawrence, 
at the great Provincial Exhibition held in the newly-built Crystal 
Palace in Montreal, the Horticultural Department was a main 
feature. A news report states : "For the first time our enterprising and 
ably conducted Horticultural Society has a good place in which to 
exhibit the treasures and beauties of the gardens of Montreal, and 
well have our gardeners availed themselves of this advantage." 

D. W. BEADLE, LAWYER-NURSERYMAN 

About this time there emerges on the gardening scene a man who 
might well be considered Canada's first qualified horticulturist, and 
who was to provide organizational, scientific and literary leadership 
in this field during the decade before Confederation and for some 
time after. Delos W. Beadle, B.A., LL.B., for one of his generation, 
had unusual educational qualifications for such a task. Beadle was a 
lawyer - turned - nurseryman for reasons of health. Born at St. 
Catherines, Ontario, in 1823, he attended Yale College and gradu- 
ated in 1844; received his B.A. (ad eundem) from Toronto 
University two years later; in 1847 received his LL.B. from Harvard, 
and was called to the Bar in New York City in 1848, where he 
practised law for about six years. His failing health at only thirty- 
two made it necessary for him to seek an outdoor life, and with the 
assistance of his father he established a nursery business about 1855 
in St. Catherines, in which he continued until his retirement in 1887. 
The rest of his life he spent in Toronto, a student of nature and 
botanical research, until his death in 1905. 

His large experimental nursery must have been a time- 
consuming responsibility, yet in 1861 he was appointed secretary of 
the Fruit Growers Association of Upper Canada, and continued 
such until 1887. The Association President, Dr. William Saunders 
(Experimental Farm Ottawa), in his annual address of 1884, spoke 
of Beadle as the man "to whom the Association owes its present 
high position and influence, more than to any other, past or present". 

After the Hon. George Brown established The Canadian 
Farmer, a newspaper which circulated in all the settled sections of 



59 



Canada, Beadle edited the Horticultural Department for many years. 
The publication by the F.G.A. of the Canadian Horticulturalist was 
undertaken in 1878 with him as editor 8 . It was from this periodical 
that R. W. Oliver obtained the "first published list of recommended 
roses for Canada". In 1862 Beadle was appointed a corresponding 
member of the Royal Horticultural Society, which kept him aware 
of world-wide developments in his field. There is evidence of his 
correspondence with gardeners in all parts of Canada, so that it could 
be said "his statement on horticultural matters are everywhere looked 
upon as authoritative and reliable". 

FIRST DEFINITIVE WORK ON HORTICULTURE 

It was inevitable that such a man, in view of his unique 
qualifications and practical experience, should feel impelled to write 
the first definitive book on Canadian horticulture. It was tided The 
Canadian Fruit, Flower, and Kitchen Gardener, published in 
Toronto in 1872, a book of 400 pages covering every phase of 
gardening in detail, illustrated with drawings and sketches. Now, for 
the first time, the Canadian gardener had available the "know-how" 
of gardening, specifically applied to his own peculiar climatic 
conditions. 

For the rose hobbyist of course, the most fascinating part of the 
book is the section on Roses. It reveals that the author writes from 
actual experience about rose-growing, and loves the Queen of 
Flowers. He is almost lyrical in his reference to her charms; he 
addresses himself to Canadian gardeners who "have beautiful roses 
in their hearts", a phrase which is part of the opening sentence of 
the classic Book About Roses, by the famous English rosarian Dean S. 
Reynolds Hole, first president of the National Rose Society. In his 
use of this quotation, Beadle indicates he was familiar with Hole's 
book, published in England in 1869. 

Beadle's cultural directions for growing the rose cover the 
entire range: choice of location, judicious selection of varieties, soil, 
drainage, pruning, garden pests, fertilizers, even winter protection. 
One finds it remarkable how similar his advice is to that found in 
any modern book on rose culture. A detailed description of budding 
methods implies that this propagating technique was then current 
practice in Canada. 

60 



ROSES RECOMMENDED FOR CANADIAN GROWERS 



The main interest for the roseman lies in the fact that we have 
here the first published critical examination by name, of the 
varieties being grown at that time in Canada, and including con- 
siderations of colour, hardiness, blooming habits, etc. The modern 
rose grower will be surprised at the number of these roses of one 
hundred years ago, which are still available from nurseries specializ- 
ing in old garden roses. Let us examine his analysis, as much as 
possible using his terms. 

Climbing Roses: he believes Canadians must content them- 
selves with the hardy Prairie climbers (R. setigera), or those with a 
large infusion of Prairie blood. They are strong growers, flowers are 
borne in large clusters. The best are: 'Queen of the Prairies', 
'Baltimore Belle' 'Gem of the Prairies', and the Ayrshire rose 'Queen 
of the Belgians'. 

( 2 ) Summer Roses, i.e. roses which bloom chiefly in June ; he 
considers the very best include: 'Aureti', 'Boule de Nanteuil', 
'Cabbage or Common Provence' (he suggests it is probably the oldest 
type in existence), 'Coupe de Hebe', 'Charles Lawson', 'Duchess of 
Buccleugh', 'Kean', 'Madame Plantier', 'Madame Hardy', 'Paul 
Ricaut', 'Persian Yellow' and 'Vivid'. Another rose 'Oeillet Parfait', 
which he notes looks like a striped carnation, is unusual and 
attractive. 

Of the Mosses he recommends: 'Common Moss', 'Crested', 
'Glory of the Mosses', 'Laneii', 'Luxembourg', 'Nuits de Young'. 

(3) Autumn Roses, also known as Remontants or Hybrid 
Perpetuals; he warns that many so-named yield very few autumn 
flowers; varieties which "will challenge the attention of every passer- 
by and compel him to pause and admire" are: 'Achille Gounod', 
'Baron Haussman', 'Boule de Neige', 'Comtesse de Chabrilliant', 
'Charles Lefebvre', 'Charles Verdier', 'Dr. Lindley', 'Duchesse de 
Caylus', 'Duke of Edinburgh', 'Fisher Holmes', 'Felix Genero', 
'Gloire du Ducher', 'John Hopper', 'Lord Macaulay', 'La Rhone', 
'Marechal Vaillant', 'Maurice de Pontbriand', 'Madame Alfred de 
Rougemont', 'Madame la Baronne de Pontbriand', 'Madame Marie 
Cirodde', 'Mademoiselle Annie Wood', 'Prince Camille de Rohan', 
'Pierre Notting', 'Pitord', 'Prince de Parcia', 'Prince Humbert', 
'Senateur Vaisse', 'Souvenir de Ponsard', 'Souvenir de William 
Wood', 'Thorin', 'William Griffith', 'Xavier Olibo'; 'General 



61 



Jacqueminot' while loose and open, also 'Geant des Batailles' and 
'La Reine' are worth growing if one has room. 

There is an informative comment: "While we have not yet 
attained to that general enthusiasm in the cultivation of the rose in 
Canada, that demands a Provincial Rose Show, where each flower is 
critically examined, the varieties recommended will be hard to beat, 
if grown by those who do have opportunity to exhibit". 

(4) Monthly Roses, these are chiefly related to the China rose 
he explains, all are too tender to endure exposure to Canadian winters 
in his opinion, but suitable for potting and to be grown indoors. Teas : 
'Alba Rosea', 'Archimede', 'Bougere', 'Devoniensis', 'Gloire de 
Dijon', Marechal NieT, 'Madame Villermoz', 'Madame Margottin', 
'Niphetos', 'President', 'Souvenir d'Elise Vardon', 'Souvenir d'un 
Ami', 'Triomphe de Guillot Fils'; Bourbons: 'Modele de Perfection', 
'Emotion', 'Rev. H. Dombrain', 'Souvenir de Malmaison'; Noisette: 
'Lamarque'. 

RECOGNITION AND APPRECIATION 

Here, then, we have a list of the rose varieties grown and recom- 
mended by the most knowledgeable rosarian in Canada one hundred 
years ago; these undoubtedly were the roses grown by most Canadian 
rosemen at the time of Confederation. 

We have sketched something of the increasing interest in rose- 
growing as Canada approached Confederation; noted the regular 
importation of the latest varieties after introduction in Britain and the 
Continent, and made available in many Canadian nurseries; 
observed the keen participation in the rose classes at the annual horti- 
cultural shows, and the formation by gardeners of many societies for 
mutual help, and finally have seen a developing horticultural 
literature. 

At this Centennial period it is appropriate that modern rose 
enthusiasts should pay a tribute of respect and gratitude to such men 
as Delos W. Beadle, James Dougall and others of the pre-Confedera- 
tion generation for their contribution to the Genus Rosa. "We reap 
where others have sown". 

REFERENCES 

1. Outdoor Roses in Canada, R. W. Oliver, Department of Agriculture pamph- 
let, 1 946, 1 950 reprint. 



62 



2. Hochelaga Depicta, Newton Bosworth, 1839. 

3. "Early New England Roses," American Rose Annual, 1954. Research re- 
veals that the roses grown in that period included: gallica, damask, Rosa 
Mundi, moss, sweet brier, cinnamon and Provence. 

4. Journal of the Montreal Horticultural Society, 1897 series. 

5. Since the railway to Portland was not opened until 1853, such supplies were 
conveyed from Boston to Montreal by road transport, i.e. stage coach. 

6. The Canadian Farmer, 1867 etc. 

7. Transactions of the Board of Agriculture of Upper Canada 1850-68. 

8. The Canadian Horticulturist 1878: whicih continued, with minor changes 
in name and management, until 1947. 



The rose that lives its little hour 

Is prized beyond the sculptured flower. 

WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT 



A lovely being, scarcely formed or moulded, 
A rose with all its sweetest leaves yet folded. 

LORD BYRON 



63 



Induced Mutation in Roses 



John Schloen 
Brooklin, Ont. 

jy^ANY times we see variations in form or colour of a rose growing 
under natural conditions, and there are several reasons why this 
happens. It may be due to excess sunshine or severe cold, but most 
often it is caused by the choice and hardiness of the understock. The 
hardy multiflora understock is good for severe climates, and the 
canina understock gives a more vivid flower, although canina takes a 
longer time to become established. Through selection of grafting wood, 
using only the best wood from the most perfect flowers, the habit and 
structure of the plant may be changed and controlled. 

Nature often creates a change or freak in an otherwise constant 
plant. We sometimes find a change on one branch of a plant, with a 
different colour or form of flower from those which are on the rest 
of the plant. This flower, showing a change from the parent, is called 
a sport or mutation, and sometimes in this manner new varieties are 
found. 

Since we have so many varieties of cross-bred roses, this sporting 
happens quite frequently, for the cells step out of balance from some 
unknown cause and take on a new colour or form. It is sometimes 
caused by a bump or bruise on the plant. 

Through radiation, science has now developed a new way of 
mechanically obtaining new varieties, and at Ellesmere we have 
experimented in a small way with x-ray methods. We have subjected 
the seed, the branch, and the root stock with large doses of x-ray under 
controlled conditions. In testing the seed we had almost complete 
failure; it appeared to have become sterile. With the help of our 
experimental stations we had some good luck with the scions or 
branches on which the buds are located in the leaf sockets, and the 
result achieved was similar to the one created by nature. At the same 
time we were able to control the varieties we wished to experiment on, 
and the timing of the results. It was of the greatest importance to 

64 



adjust the length of time and the strength of the x-ray treatment to 
the age of the scions. For instance, a young scion would require much 
less radiation than an older one. 

Sometimes the results were disappointing : the buds were either 
killed or weakened ; and at other times the quality of the flowers and 
plants was so improved and strengthened that we did develop a new 
and hardier rose. 

After the buds had been treated with x-ray, they were grafted 
on the hardiest understock in the greenhouses, and when the first 
flowers appeared, were budded several more times to make sure the 
colour and form were constant. In most cases the flower remained 
constant. The plants are then tested in the growing fields under 
natural conditions, and their endurance to heat and cold observed. 

I am intrigued with the possibilities opened up by the use of 
radiation of different kinds of fruit, vegetables and meats. It may be 
a new method of controlling disease of plants, and might end the need 
for the constant use of poisons on our land. There are endless possibili- 
ties and we are just beginning. 



/ love old gardens best . . . 
But most of all in June . . . 
June with her ridt of roses tangled in thorns. 

FRANCES BEATRICE TAYLOR 



65 



Glengariff Revisited 



Mrs. J. J. Gallagher 
St. Gabriel de Brandon, Que. 

JT will linger in our memory — the summer of 1966 — as the 
outstanding season of many years, the summer of lovely, sunny 
days and the kaleidoscopic beauty of a continuous show of lovely 
roses in all their glory. 

Glengariff is in the Laurentide hills, 70 miles north of Montreal, 
and on the average 10° to 15° cooler than that city. Three feet of 
snow covered the rose beds in early April. It was topped by an icy 
crust, and as the snow melted, the beds accumulated a reservoir of 
moisture in the earth that was supplemented by the heavy rains late 
in that month. May was cloudy, cool with more rain. 

In June came hot sunny days in the 80°, always blessed with 
cooling breezes, and the trees, which but yesterday were great naked 
branches etched against the sky, were soon clothed with a wealth of 
fresh green leaves. 

Suddenly, the small rose bushes were pushing out new tiny ten- 
drills soon opening into masses of softly colored foliage. 

The earth was now in good tilth and the gardens could be put in 
order. The earth was hoed and smoothed over the surface of the rose 
beds — a saucer-like depression made in the centre of each plant, into 
which was poured about 1 pint of Hyponex solution ( 1 teaspoon to 
a gallon) . This has been our practice for a number of years. We have 
found it of value. 

After each bed is finished, edges trimmed, lawn space between 
the beds mowed, just looking at the gardens gives one quite a lift. 
And in this pleasant state of mind one recalled Dr. Wilding's words 
in his "Ten Poplars Above the Sea" (The Rose Annual, 1966) and 
they are doubly appreciated; "The sight of newly mown lawns and 
freshly hoed flower beds still please me". ( The doctor moves around in 
his wheelchair). "When I worked in my own garden I came nearer 

66 



to my roses so that I comprehended more clearly, could listen more 
closely, to the message they whispered". 

On our knees, or perhaps on a very small stool, seeing and per- 
forming all the small needs of a rose bush invites intimacy between 
gardener and plant that makes for a "difference" hardly perceptible, 
maybe, between rose gardens ! 

The foliage as it grows takes on its special characteristics, 
leathery or soft, bronzy, reddish, many shades of green. We admire 
and love this young foliage with its shine of sparkling leaves. 

Ordinarily, before going back to the city for a short visit, we 
spray the rose gardens with Isotex, feeling all will be well on our 
return. This year, trying out a policy of gardening without poison, we 
felt less secure. And, sure enough, on returning to the country, we 
were dismayed to find in our two top rose beds (about 50 plants to a 
bed) the ground was littered with yellowing leaves and there were 
yellow leaves far up on the bushes ! And this is June when the bushes 
were very young in leaves ! 

Gathering the leaves, following our present method, we buried 
them deep in the compost pile. 

We have a small sprinkler which emits a good volume of water 
straight up into the bushes, enveloping the plant. So we placed it in 
the saucer-like depression under the bush and turned on the water. 
Water, we are told, is one of the best of all sprays. 

It was fortunate the other gardens were free of the pest, a spider 
mite. Even 1 00 plants take a lot of time to water in this manner. In 
the next day or two, kneeling close up into the plants, we dusted with 
Atox — which we never have considered as a poison. Intent as we 
were in this task, there flashed into our mind recurrent memories of 
Melvin Wyant's nurseries on Johnny Cake Ridge. But it was his 
beautiful show garden, near his home in the nursery, that was most 
vivid in our memory. Here he displays a grand assortment of lovely 
roses growing under conditions paralleling those in our own private 
gardens. Included were Queen Elizabeth, tall, wide bushes with the 
same silvery-pink blooms; McGredy's Yellow, Jeanie, Ardelle, Mrs. 
Sam McGredy, Dainty Bess, Mrs. Pierre S. Dupont, Josephine 
Bruce, Helen Traubel. During a most interesting discussion, he made 
an observation to the effect that sometime he would like to breed a rose 
whose leaves began five or more inches above the ground, in the 

67 



belief that such a type would eliminate a lot of blackspot and spider 
mites! 

It may be a coincidence, but Lucky Piece, which has been in the 
GlengarifT gardens three to four years, grows in this manner ! It has a 
stem 2" to 2 I /i" in diameter and the foliage begins at least six inches 
above the ground. The plant has assumed the size and habits of a 
shrub, branching out on all sides and reaching a height of seven feet. 
It has a beautiful, Peace-like foliage of heavy, leathery texture, deep 
green and glossy, the blooms very double, orange-red to orange-pink. 
No blackspot, no mites bother this plant. 

This yellowing and picking up of leaves carried on for a while, 
causing a loss of foliage we could ill afford. It stopped as suddenly as it 
began. But then there were other fields to conquer, caterpillars, every- 
where, insects of all kinds. It was a bug year. The caterpillars were 
hand-picked, nesting places found and burned. In this task we had 
welcome help from young ladies 16 to 21, who live in the Top House 
and the Midway House in the Glengariff enclave of the Gallaghers. 

Generally, our first blooming period comes before the invasion 
of aphids. This year they surprised us, having taken over at the 
beginning of the season and become well established. We used a strong 
stream of water on them, which, theoretically, would dispose of them. 
But not this year. We dipped the tips in bowls of Atox, a very delicate 
operation. We sprayed with a liquid soap solution. No results. All of 
this time we were using the good old thumb and finger treatment. 
But for the fact that it was a windy summer, a good dusting with Atox 
might have helped more. We tried a rhubarb spray, successfully used 
by a neighbor in her lovely, old-fashioned English gardens. We placed 
a dozen big leaves in a container, covered them with water and 
allowed to boil hard. After leaving overnight, the strained liquid was 
poured into a gallon pail which was then filled with water. It smelt ! 
Then we sprayed. While supposed to be effective against aphids and 
blackspot, the aphids kept on sucking and the mixture left ugly mark- 
ings on leaves and petals, similar to most chemicals. There was no 
blackspot in the H.T. gardens, so it was difficult to ascertain if the 
mixture might have proved of value. In the Floribunda bed, by our 
tennis court, here and there were some bushes with blackspot. We 
took off the leaves, but if it persisted, we cut down the bush. Drastic 
action, but the only way to prevent the disease from spreading. And 

68 



the few plants totally defoliated were hardly noticeable in the density 
of foliage in this garden. 

One idea that worked was putting of aluminum foil cut to nestle 
around the base of the bush. This experimental bed was free of insects 
up to the top leaves, where naturally, there were some aphids, but not 
to the same extent as in other beds. Occupants of the Top House and 
the Midway House did not like the appearance of the aluminum. 
But to the gardener in the Old House, she felt she was One Plus and 
was quite unperturbed. 

The old practice of throwing ashes on the beds and hoeing them 
in is once more in favor, seemingly as a preventative of all sorts of 
things. Also, we find, while we put the peat moss on as a mulch in 
early July, it is a better idea to begin incorporating it into the soil a 
week or so later, not deeply, but persistendy, not allowing it to rest 
and become a compact insulation in hot weather or to take on a 
greenish hue on damp days. 

Watering, too, goes along with changes. When plants are low, 
as they begin again every May, we use the lawn sprinklers. They 
throw a mist-like watering over a large, large territory. Left on long 
enough they really saturate the ground. We do this once a week and 
in the morning. Roses react to this kind of watering, soon grow and 
leaf out in an outstanding way. Later on, we go back to individual 
watering, right into that saucer-like depression under each bush, a 
gentle flow. Here is an interesting speculation — when it rains, the 
rain falls on flower and leaf; a spray coats all of the leaf so what 
plausible explanation is there against overhead watering? We have 
found no answer. We all know the havoc created by heavy rainfall, 
accompanied by strong winds. The rose beds then are in a mess, calling 
for the cutting of spent blooms when they dry out, and the use of 
a long, narrow rake to reach fallen petals and to bring back order to 
the beds. It could be that good overhead watering would produce the 
same chaos. 

There are so many hazards to contend with in the rose garden ! 
Dogs love to lie on the cool soil of a rose bed. We know — we have 
four Boxers. That's bad enough. But when it is followed by a romp 
through the bed that is something else ! 

Then there are the tennis players who bat their balls occasionally 
with a force no rose stem can withstand. But the Old Gardener is 
ready with her emergency kit. Bent stems are reinforced effectively 



69 



with slender green sticks bound with green twistems. In some cases, 
where whole stems have been broken off, she replants immediately 
right near the parent plant, pouring in a pint of Hyponex solution, 
hilling up, watering for a few days and protecting from the sun with 
a cardboard box. All of which, perhaps is not scientific gardening but 
it's fun, and after thirty years' experience one becomes quite expert 
in looking after all kinds of garden mishaps. The maple grove beyond 
the rose gardens is the habitat of four young fellows 7 to 1 1 who are 
Batmen hunters and other characters as their mood suggests. They cut 
saplings, debark them and brandishing these alleged weapons they 
charge through the gardens, trailed by five little girls five to nine years 
old and the inevitable four Boxers. Naturally, there are casualties 
among the flowers, but so what? 

The rose gardens are a part of their summer living every year. 
Sometimes, a little girl will say "Oh, Grannie, there's a truly beautiful 
rose in the garden today. I want it for my room". Today that rose is 
Confidence. Another day it will be Lady Sylvia. Already, at six years, 
this little one has an eye for form. One of the smaller boys dashing by 
(they never walk) will shout "It smells good here!" Another is 
stopped by a new color, Wobum Abbey, which is of a distinctly 
different shade to all others in the gardens. 

Every Saturday the little girls pick their roses to wear in their hair 
for church on Sundays, and their Papas pick any small opening bud 
for a boutoniere, prefarebly The Fairy or Mattze Cazant. This is an 
old fashioned English custom — we read about it as far back as 1920. 
The Reverend Joseph Pemberton writes humorously about the cab- 
bage rose he would choose for his Sunday buttonhole. 

Woburn Abbey with its delightful orange, yellow, red shades, is 
in the Little Garden. Perhaps one of the nicest things about a little 
Garden is that it leaves so much to the imagination. Every year new 
ideas take form, and while achievements never come up to fond 
expectations the process of working them out is fun and the garden is 
always a lovesome spot to be in. A number of the Old Garden Roses 
planted here years ago have grown unwieldy. They were transplanted 
to gardens below the Old House. Erfurt remains in its original loca- 
tion. Now its long arching branches with the pink and white buds 
and open faced blooms nestling in a lovely way on shining reddish 
foliage are pinned to the ground. Near it are large Shasta daisies 
which, with care, bloom all summer long. And, on the trellis nearby, 



70 



which never tolerated any kind of vine, a Blaze planted this year sur- 
prised us with three or four blooms, all of which makes a pretty corner. 

Now, a number of red-orange rose bushes grow along with more 
Shasta daisies and there are oases of Marigold and Ageratum, bright 
and pretty, a number of plants of Tagetas (marigolds) growing here 
and there among the roses, doing their duty as insectant repellents. 
They have proved to be good policemen. 

Mischief, coral salmon, Wendy Cussons, deep rose red, Peggy 
McGredy, deep red pink blooms combine to make a very handsome 
center piece. Unlike most of the roses here, which try to reach the 
stars, these are content growing to a height of three feet. 

A new group in this area was one of four Miss Canadas, Vermil- 
lion rose color and silvery reverse. With the drift of Shasta daisies 
about them they fitted in this garden. In one corner there is a wee 
rock garden where the miniature roses grow. Spots of Alyssum are 
allowed to grow just enough to call your attention to the area. A 
Floribunda, we'll call it Pinkie, with the most perfectly formed small 
buds hangs over a small rock on one side of this Little Garden. We clip 
the blooms before they grow larger. 

Every year a group of Japanese ladies and gentiemen find their 
way to Glengariff gardens. They are intrigued by the miniature roses 
over which they linger and of which their praise is indeed fulsome. 
On leaving this season one of the ladies remarked "each year after our 
visit here I return home and order another dozen roses for next year", 
but with the morning's dew another comes and shines again." 

There are Old Roses on the other side of the Little Garden, like 
the fabulous Raubritter sprawling over the stone way all July its 
hundreds of cup-like soft, pink blooms, long lasting are very decora- 
tive. Then there is Macrantha trailing along the same wall, a bloom 
exquisite in form, its soft, almond shade of petals opening to the heat 
of the morning sun and closing so tenderly at dusk over the golden 
stamens. A cascade of its lovely blooms makes one's heart glow. The 
ease with which an Old Rose grows gives one the impression that 
it has come back home. Given a spot of its own it grows and grows 
until it positively must be curtailed. One plant of Grannie's Rose, on 
its own roots from the Dropmore Nursery has become a long, im- 
penetrable hedge along the roadside of the garden joining Spinosissima 
Altaica for a length of more than 100 feet. Someone has written so 
prettily of the single Old Time Rose: "It tires and fades and falls 

71 



Furthermore its delightful scent drifts in the air for many days. 

The beautiful summer weather continued on in September. The 
early mornings began in fog but as the heavy mist rose up from the 
lake, bringing the hills into view, the sun took over. It became 
warm, even hot. September is the leisurely month. The summer 
people have returned to town, the children to school. The aphids, 
likewise, have gone. Going through the garden one tends to 
evaluate summer activities. Was it the gardening without poisons 
or the really remarkable summer itself, with so much sun and suffi- 
cient watering right to the last day that contributed most to such 
satisfactory results? It is difficult to arrive at a firm conclusion. 

We compare the first blooming period, June 25 to July 5, 
according to season, with that of later date. In the first blooming 
the bushes may be 2 J/2 to 3 feet with adequate, but not extensive 
foliage, blooms disbudded. This is always a very beautiful show, 
lasting well into July. Then, later in the season when we look over 
the gardens, many of the bushes are 6 feet tall, with wide expanding 
branches, not disbudded, so there are hundreds of blooms on long 
stems, their autumn coloring greatly intensified. Each rose is ex- 
quisite, the foliage superb, truly remarkable ! 

There was a great deal of handwork involved in the plan of 
gardening without poisons. Even so, we are encouraged to give it 
another trial, subject to a good deal of quiet pondering during the 
long winter months. The late September days were devastatingly 
beautiful as the sun shone on the constantly changing of the brilliant 
coloring of the trees. It is the nights that are enchanting ! The huge 
Harvest Moon floods the gardens with light, throwing long shadows 
of distant talis trees with glimpses of patches of light colored roses, 
tear drops on their petals and shining, dew-covered leaves. 

It seems quiet but there are a hundred sounds on the air, a 
murmur of the leaves on the nearby trees stirred by a gende zephyr 
that brings their color into focus, the rustle of half-dried leaves on 
the ground as small animals of the wood scurry by on nightly errands, 
the echo of the loud noise of far away crickets. 

But to the Old Gardener who has lived so intimately with it 
all for months it is a parting song at this moment of au revoir. Each 
tiny impression of the magic of this night has its own particular 
charm and will be treasured in the reservoir of happy memories, 
sweet music over the long winter period. 

72 



Systemic Pesticides and Roses 



Beresford J. Watt 1 
Montreal, Que. 

As the name implies, a "systemic" pesticide is one which actually 
enters the plant's system and is transported in the sap stream to all 
parts of the plant including the interior of the plant cells. Thus, if the 
pesticide is slightly water-soluble and is introduced into the soil it is 
picked up by the roots and carried up through the plant. It is then 
concentrated at the growing tips where it actually does the most good 
since the growing tip is soft and most prone to attack by aphids and 
other sucking insects. 

Systemic compounds are not a recent discovery. Certain Selenium 
compounds have been known to possess such properties and for many 
years have been used by professional greenhouse growers for insect 
control on certain ornamentals. The problem with Selenium com- 
pounds was that they were very poisonous and a slight excess in the 
dosage not only killed the aphids but severely injured the plants. 

Following the introduction of the first organo-phosphorus systemic 
insecticide Schradan, named after the discoverer Dr. Schrader, which 
heralded the advent of a new concept of insect control, there has been 
a slow, but steady, flow of new compounds, more effective and in one 
or two instances less toxic to humans. Some of these well known pro- 
ducts are Systox (demeton), methyl demeton, Di-Syston, Thimet 
(phorate) , phosphamidon, and dimethoate. 

Some advantages of systemic insecticides are as follows : They are 
very active against aphids, mites and certain other sucking insects such 
as leafhoppers — and they are long-lasting. When sprayed on the 
plants, or painted on the stems, they enter the plant and give at least 
two weeks of excellent aphid control. Those which are suitable for soil 
application (either as a liquid, granular formulation or mixed with 
fertilizer) will give six weeks or more aphid control. 

*Mr. Watt is Technical Supervisor of Green Cross Products. 

73 



When the systemic insecticide Di-Syston first became available (a 
very toxic insecticide) the writer made a number of trials against a 
wide variety of insects. When applied to the soil it gave excellent con- 
trol of aphids and tended to give some control of rose midge, however, 
it was interesting to note that it did not have any effect on spittlebugs 
in spite of the large volume of sap which they obviously remove from 
the treated plant. It also had little effect on chewing caterpillars nor 
on borers which live right inside the stem and which one would expect 
would be unlikely to escape the chemical surrounding them. Sys- 
temics, when applied to the soil in this manner for aphid control have 
the advantage of sparing the beneficial predators such as the Lady- 
bird beetle larvae which are among the most aggressive of our natural 
controls for aphids. 

From personal experience with several flower beds ranging in con- 
tent from a very few to many roses it has been found that there is a 
vast difference in the degree and number of problems one will en- 
counter with only a few rose bushes as compared with a large bed of 
roses. If a gardener has only three or four roses and tells you he never 
sprays them and hardly ever has any disease problems he is usually 
telling the truth. The few bushes often almost entirely escape Black 
Spot and Mildew and Aphids are the chief problem, which he ignores. 

It is the gardener with only a few roses (the part-time rose grower) 
who can benefit most from the soil-applied systemic insecticides. They 
will control the aphids. The serious rose grower, however, will likely 
try these soil applications too and will achieve almost perfect aphid 
control — but — he should beware ! The little aphid is a conspicuous 
pest which "activates" the gardener to bring out his sprayer and, 
being a conscientious soul, he doesn't omit the fungicides for the pre- 
vention of diseases like Black Spot and Mildew. It only takes a serious 
infection on one bush in the garden with Black Spot or Mildew to start 
a spreading epidemic which can progress from one end of the bed to 
the other thus spoiling a good many bushes before it can be stopped. 
This, I believe, is the chief disadvantage of the systemic insecticides 
when used as soil applications by the home-owner on his roses. As one 
can easily find out by trying, the pest problems of a large bed of roses 
can quite literally be "no bed of roses" even with the Aphids under 
complete control. 

Quite recently, a new compound of the organo-phosphorus type 
was developed in Holland known as "Wepsyn Liquid" which is a sys- 

74 



temic fungicide and which is very active against Powdery Mildew 
when applied as a spray. In addition to! being highly effective against 
Powdery Mildew it controls Aphids, thus a special insecticide spray is 
not required when this fungicide-insecticide compound is used. Being 
a liquid, it does not leave any unsightly residues on the leaves or 
flowers and it also has the advantage of providing Mildew control at 
low temperatures, a weakness of Sulfur which is more active at 
moderately warm temperatures. There are two weaknesses of Wepsyn 
Liquid which limit its use at present. First, it is specific against Pow- 
dery Mildew and it does not control Black Spot and, second, it is too 
poisonous for the home-owner to handle as it requires extreme cau- 
tions which many people do not wish to observe. 

Systemic fungicides are the things dreams are made of. The 
answer to our dreams of disease control would be fungicide which 
you could apply to the soil which would be taken up by the plant to 
provide continuous protection against such diseases as Apple Scab, 
Black Spot of Roses and Mildew. To date there are only a few rather 
specific systemic fungicides, very new, and as far as can be ascer- 
tained quite limited in scope. This is a beginning, however, and cer- 
tainly along the right direction. 

Plants are subject to disease attack during rainy or very humid 
weather and Black Spot of Roses is no exception. It can become very 
virulent when conditions are warm and humid in the middle of the 
growing season. The spores are splashed from infected soil by rain- 
drops onto the lower leaves where round inky-looking spots soon de- 
velop. The leaves later turn yellow and drop off leaving the lower part 
of the bush stripped of foliage with ugly bare stems showing instead of 
glossy green foliage. It is interesting to note that European rose 
authorities refer to a fungous named Marsonia rosea as true "Black 
Spot" and they state that another disease, Actinonema rosea, of which 
the adult form is called Diplocarpon rosea, is frequently confused with 
Marsonia, whereas in this country "Black Spot" is always referred to 
as Diplocarpon rosea. A sticky black spot which occurs on unsprayed 
plants should not be confused with Black Spot. The sticky soot is 
"Sooty Mould" which grows on the honeydew secreted by aphids. 

Many fungicides are quite effective in providing a degree of pro- 
tection for roses against Black Spot. They are the so-called protective 
fungicides which include copper compounds, sulfur, ferbam, glyodin, 
maneb, zineb, captan and others. Most of these have only a very 



75 



limited effect on the Black Spot disease once it is established in the 
leaf. One of the most effective new apple scab fungicides, dodine, is 
very effective against Black Spot of roses. It has the unique property 
of being able to penetrate leaf tissue and thus is known as a "local 
systemic" fungicide. It has to be applied to the foliage and does not 
perform if applied to the soil. This "local systemic" property is marked 
enough so that if the underside of a leaf only is treated with dodine, 
the upper surface will also be completely protected. Dodine is particu- 
larly active against Black Spot and unlike most fungicides, is capable 
of arresting or eradicating Black Spot so that the leaves which are 
infected will usually remain on the bush until winter instead of drop- 
ping prematurely. Dodine should be used to prevent Black Spot at 
very low dosages in a protective schedule to avoid leaf injury. Dodine 
alone provides outstanding control of Black Spot but, as is the case 
with captan alone, it does not provide any degree of control of Pow- 
dery Mildew and thus is not the answer to complete disease control on 
roses when used alone. 

Rose growers, in general, are not aware of the fact that roses are 
subject to attacks of another Mildew known as "Downy Mildew" in 
which brown spots sometimes form on the leaves before they turn 
greyish yellow and fall from the plant. Powdery Mildew, on the other 
hand, is like a white powder on the young shoots and buds, which 
seriously affects their growth and this is the disease on which everyone 
places the most emphasis. One of the problems is that the "Mildew" 
fungicides commonly used such as Karathane (dinocap) while active 
against Powdery Mildew, fail to control Downy Mildew. Such fungi- 
cides as zineb, maneb or sulfur are active against Downy Mildew and 
these should be tried if mildew control during the summer seems less 
than adequate with the "specific" mildew fungicides commonly used. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that successful rose growers can- 
not depend on any single pesticide chemical for disease and insect 
control and to help them achieve success the pesticides manufacturers 
have produced mixtures of insecticides and fungicides. The original 
mixtures were chiefly wettable powders or dusts. Successful dust 
formulae usually contain captan with sulfur, or folpet (for diseases) 
along with DDT (for chewing insects) and malathion (for Aphids) . 

Recent development of the new liquid systemic insecticides has 
stimulated the search for more effective pesticide combinations of in- 
secticides and fungicides, but this has not been simple. Most mixtures 



76 



present surprisingly complex problems. For example, a mixture of 
dimethoate with certain solvents or liquid fungicides causes either a 
breakdown of the active ingredients or the formation of very poison- 
ous substances, extremely hazardous to handle. Similarly, methyl 
demeton soon breaks down in liquid fungicide combinations to a 
worthless liquid. In fact, it is very difficult to formulate even a non- 
systemic liquid insecticide-fungicide combination. To date there is, 
to my knowledge, only one really good liquid systemic insecticide- 
fungicide combination product available to the amateur rose grower. 
This contains phosphamidon (extremely effective against Aphids and 
other insects — a systemic insecticide which penetrates the leaves and 
can't be washed off by rain) ; DDT (for certain chewing insects) ; 
dodine ("local systemic" fungicide for Black Spot control) ; and 
Karathane (dinocap) for Powdery Mildew control. 

This liquid combination has the distinct advantage of producing 
beautiful leaves, unmarked by powders or visible spray deposits and 
providing outstanding Aphid and Black Spot control. It is poisonous if 
taken internally and should be handled carefully being especially care- 
ful to keep the bottle out of reach of small children. 

The average amateur rose grower can expect outstanding results 
from the use of the modern liquid "Systemic" insecticide-fungicide 
mixtures for roses and the really large grower can also depend on the 
use of the mixtures for his regular sprayings throughout the season with, 
use of the mixture for his regular sprayings throughout the season with, 
perhaps, the occasional "specific" spray containing a wetting agent 
along with the fungicide for Mildew late in the season when Aphids 
and Black Spot are no longer a problem. 

Regular spraying with the modern systemic mixtures will make you 
wonder where the Aphids and Black Spot disappeared to ; you won't 
see them all summer ! 

/ see His blood upon the rose 

And in the stars the glory of His eyes. 

JOSEPH MARY PLUNKETT 



77 



The Future of Roses in Canada 



R. Simonet 
South Edmonton, Alberta 

J FEEL quite safe in forecasting a very bright future for Roses in 
Canada. As I see it, the main cause for greatiy increased planting 
of Roses in Canadian gardens is very likely to be the introduction of 
new varieties much better adapted to our northern climate. 

At the present time we have only very few really hardy varieties 
that do well in the colder parts of Canada and the color range and 
flower qualities of these is low when compared to the popular but 
tender Hybrid Tea and Floribundas. These tender varieties are being 
planted in large numbers every year and usually make a fair show the 
first season, but whether they do as well or better the next season 
depends largely on winter protection given them. An early and heavy 
snowfall covering them all winter has been found best but not to be 
expected every Fall. Usually loss of plants is heavy as the wood of 
these everblooming varieties is known to winterkill at about zero 
Fahrenheit. 

Clearly, the great need is for hardier everblooming Roses with 
flower qualities at least equal to present day Hybrid Teas and Flori- 
bundas. The lack of hardiness of these everblaDming Roses is not 
surprising as no very hardy species entered in their make-up. Only 
by the introduction of very hardy species into the present strains of 
everblooming Roses can progress be made. 

As hardy species are only once blooming and have single flowers 
of usually thin texture it is not as simple as it may seem to obtain the 
good points of both parent types in the "Ideal" Hardy Rose. Time 
and many hybrid plants are needed to afford the best possible selec- 
tions. Several Rose breeders are working at it, as I also am, and I 
have little doubt that much hardier everblooming Roses are not far 
away. 

The four main hardy species I am using as pollen parents on 
Hybrid Teas are Rosa acicularis, Rosa suffulta, Rosa laxa and Rosa 



78 



altaica. Hybrids from all four species have been raised to flowering 
size and mainly intercrossed among themselves so that some indi- 
vidual plants have the four hardy species and Hybrid Tea in their 
make-up. As expected there are very wide variations in all generations 
raised to date and even if the "Ideal" Rose has not shown up yet the 
selection of better parent plants toward it goes on every season. 

A discouraging note has been given to the possibility of breed- 
ing hardy everblooming Roses, for the apparent good reason that 
everblooming Roses are also evergrowing with their wood still in 
tender condition when frost comes. But I think I have fair proof that 
it is not always necessarily so. This in the form of a 32-inch plant 
which flowers profusely throughout the season until stopped by frost 
and still has had no killback for the last three years at 40 degrees 
below zero. Unfortunately, this plant rates low in flower qualities. It 
is a semi-double pink with thin texture petals. It is a second genera- 
tion seedling of a hybrid of "George Will" and "Aylsham". So in its 
parentage are two species: Rosa nitida and Rosa acicularis and also 
two hybrids: "Hansa" and a "Floribunda". 

Its value as a breeder is now under test with both diploid and 
tetraploid hybrid Roses as it is not yet known to which class it belongs. 
But I expect it may well contribute to better Roses for Canada. 



The Rose was given to man for this: 

He, sudden seeing it in later years, 
Should swift remember Love's first lingering kiss 

And Griefs last lingering tears. 

ISABELLA VALANCY CRAWFORD 



79 



Foliar Feeding 
in the Culture of Roses 

Dr. George and Nora Jorgenson 
Clermont, Iowa 

Foliar or leaf feeding is a well established method of feeding all 
plant life. When we say it is a new or novel way of feeding we're 
really flirting with a paradox. As far back as the eighteenth 
century a Dane, living on one of the small islands that are a part 
of the Danish empire, managed to get himself into serious trouble 
by use of foliar feeding. He was routinely growing flowers and fruits 
and vegetables in quality and quantity his neighbours were unable 
to attain. Being human, they soon grew envious and resentful, and 
they decided to do something about it, which they did. They had 
him dragged into court on a charge of witchcraft, and he narrowly 
escaped being burned at the stake. During the trial it came out that 
he had been using material from his poultry-yard, suspended in 
water with sundry other chemicals. This he had applied to his 
garden life with an old whisk broom. That was the secret. 

Somewhat later we again hear of foliar feeding. A gardener 
by the name of William Forsythe, toiling in the palace gardens of 
King George III, used a horrendous mixture composed of barnyard 
material, bonemeal, wood ashes and soapsuds. This he applied to 
the boughs and leaves of injured and ailing trees with such out- 
standing results that the King requested Parliament to give William 
Forsythe a citation for his contribution to British horticulture. 

From 1914 on we heard of this method of plant feeding in a 
sporadic sense, first from California and then from Oregon. 

Nothing much in constructive research was done in this field 
until 1907, when a plant nutritionist by the name of Thomas P. 
Reilly, residing in the picturesque Genesee Valley area of New York 
state, began a systematic study of leaf feedings. Almost tliirty-two 

80 



years were required to work out a broad and safe formula, contain- 
ing the basic and trace elements necessary for adequate plant 
nutrition. 

When the formula had been carefully tested by its creator, it 
was submitted to the plant nursery industry, and the immediate 
effects on plant growth were so startling that the formula was adopted 
for routine use. Out of all this came the commercial foliar plant 
formula known as RA-PID-GRO. 

The writer and his wife became interested in foliar feeding in 
the spring of 1951, and we have since carried on a sustained and 
painstaking research at our Iowa test gardens. During the fifteen 
years this study has been in progress all plant life in our garden has 
subsisted exclusively on nutrients applied to the leaf system at bi- 
weekly intervals during the growing season. At this time it may be 
said that all of our specimens display a remarkable titer of disease 
resistance, vigor and physiologic activity. 

And why not? The leaf has been involved in contributive 
distribution of nutrients since the first leaf was created. Earth and 
meteoric dust and bird droppings, and the like, deposited upon leaves 
and dissolved in dew or rain, have been taken into the plant circula- 
tion and utilized as sustenance as a normal way of plant existence. 

This preamble, by itself, is sufficient to establish the credibility 
of foliar feeding. Moreover, whereas we formerly were compelled 
to evaluate the effect by comparison of treated specimen against 
untreated controls, we now have a more precise technique for 
measurement. At one of our state colleges radioactive isotopes were 
brought into use. By this procedure it has been conclusively proved 
that water-soluble nutrients, when applied to the leaf system, are 
immediately taken into the sap stream, and that they move in all 
directions through the plant at a rate of approximately one inch every 
five minutes, making needed nutrients available with remarkable 
speed, and without the time consuming wait that follows application 
of most ordinary plant foods offered to the root system. For it is a 
definite fact that roots cannot absorb a nutrient of large, complex 
molecules; that material must be broken down and rendered water 
soluble. Such bacterial activity depends upon temperature and 
moisture, and it does require time. 

That is point number one in favor of feeding roses through the 
leaves. And there are many other reasons. For example, a highly 



81 



alkaline soil may lock out most nutrients, converting them into in- 
soluble carbonates and hydroxides. This can cause a rose virtually 
to starve in the midst of plenty. Application of a nutrient designed 
for foliar feeding can bypass this barrier, converting the disaster of 
dismal failure into a brilliant success. 

It has recently been established that a heavy rain or a copious 
watering can leach out a perilously high percentage of leaf-borne 
nutrients, involving not only the basic and trace elements, but also 
such complex factors as amino acids, carbohydrates and other vital 
compounds. Unless these losses are immediately replaced serious 
deficiency problems may follow. Foliar or leaf feeding can speedily 
replace water soluble basic and trace elements. 

Another facet involves the so-called micro-elements; boron, 
cobalt, iron, magnesium, manganese, to name a few. While a rose 
can limp along after a fashion without the presence of all of the 
usually required trace elements, it certainly is incapable of attaining 
its optimum capacity in bloom and growth patterns. The properly 
blended foliar plant food not only contains the basic elements — 
nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium — but also the essential trace 
elements, all in water-soluble structure. While soils generally con- 
tain adequate quantities of trace elements, deficient soils are en- 
countered, or they may have a pH value that renders them 
ineffective. 

During the last year or two, rosarians and general gardeners 
have become aware of a factor which, heretofore, has not been given 
the thought and consideration it merits. We refer to what is gener- 
ally known as the Compensation Point. 

The Compensation Point is that level in the metabolism of 
roses where just enough sugar is manufactured to meet current needs. 
By this we understand that all of the carbon dioxide produced by 
respiration is utilized in the photosynthesis of sugar, and all of the 
oxygen released by the manufacture of sugar is consumed in 
respiration. 

But there is little or no sugar produced for use during the 
darkness of night when photosynthesis ceases, inasmuch as sugar 
can be manufactured only in the presence of solar energy. For the 
same reason no appreciable quantity of sugar is manufactured for 
use during winter dormancy. 

82 



This is of utmost importance in the life of a rose. Many roses 
that fail to survive winter dormancy do so because of inadequate 
stores of sugar for use during the bitter cold of northern winters. 
One rosarian of our acquaintance has arrived at the conclusion that 
he has lost more roses by reason of inadequate stores of sugar, than 
by the lethal effect of freezing temperature. 

Which, logically, raises the question: How can foliar feeding 
be of service in correcting the effect of the Compensation Point? A 
brief exploration of the involved chemical and physical factors may 
be clarifying. If a rose is to produce an abundance of sugar, suffi- 
cient to satisfy current needs as well as requirements needed to carry 
the shrub through the contingencies of dormancy, all factors that play 
roles in the photosynthesis of sugar must be in full and co-ordinated 
operation. This involves full and adequate foliation to increase the 
area of sugar production; more leaves, more sugar. This also tends 
to create more cooling shade, slowing down respiration and the 
excess use of sugar. Availability of adequate nutrients, both in a 
quantitative and qualitative sense, is necessary to achieve a full, 
luxuriant foliation. 

Next, and equally important, is the quality of the leaves. Any 
deficiency in such elements as iron, magnesium, manganese or 
nitrogen, is bound to adversely affect the function of a shrub's leaf 
system, including the production of sugar. Routine adoption of 
foliar feeding can balance or correct aberrant lags in function from 
such sources. 

Additionally, we also think of the crown system of roots when 
we are concerned with the status of optimum nutrition. This root 
system is extremely important to all plant life. It is present just 
below the surface; a sort of surrounding crown of roots with short, 
stubby hairs. These roots are variously involved with the physiology 
of the rose. Among the numerous hormones they produce is one that 
is involved with the elongation of stems ; with growth in other words. 
Other hormones are active in the allocation and assimilation of the 
various micro-elements, especially iron. 

The crown roots are vulnerable to a high table of water; con- 
versely, they are also reactive to dryness. The moisture normally 
earned by a three inch layer of mulch approximates the ideal degree 
of moisture. The rosarian should bear in mind that these roots, by 
reason of their location, are subject to the trauma of a too energetic 



83 



hoe or spade. Since foliar feeding obviates disturbance of a mulch 
layer, we again are reminded of its broad value in the rose garden. 

We come then to the discussion of facileness of application of 
leaf nutrients. There is nothing complicated about the routine. All 
that is necessary is to carry out a bi-weekly drenching of leaves with 
a water-soluble nutrient formula designed for this purpose. (We use 
RA-PID-GRO in our study of this method of feeding.) An old 
sprinkling can will serve very well, or, if the rosarian prefers, one of 
the many types of hose-end devices. The main idea is to thoroughly 
wet the leaves with a safe and properly concentrated solution. 

Most fungicides and insecticides are chemically compatible with 
RA-PID-GRO, permitting feeding and pest control to be carried 
out in a single operation. 

Included in the composite picture favoring use of foliar feeding 
routines, is absence of the charnel house stench that may permeate 
a neighborhood when odoriferous animal by-products are applied 
for abosorption by a root system. Considered esthetically, it does 
appear unseemly to contaminate the exotic fragrance of our queen 
flower with the ofTensiveness of putrfying animal matter. This, to 
us, is nauseating to a degree beyond tolerance. 

In closing, a worthwhile suggestion may be left with the 
rosarian. When dormant roses arrive they should be unpacked at 
once and plunged into a tubful of water to which has been added 
four level teaspoonsful of RA-PID-GRO to the gallon. The 
rosarian can then, at his convenience, trim roots and stems to a 
proper length, removing long, gangling or broken roots. The shrubs 
may then be returned to the tub of nutrient solution and left there 
until earth excavations have been readied. 

By this practice the danger of drying out is avoided, and, 
moreover, absorption of considerable of the nutrient solution takes 
place. There is ample evidence to support the contention that a 
dormant shrub or tree will absorb offered nutrients through the bark 
as well as by way of the roots. 



84 



Rose Growing in 
Prince Edward Island 



by 

R. G. Lea, M.D., Charlottetown, P.E.L 

Prince Edward Island has long proudly proclaimed itself to be the 
Garden Province, and a trip through the countryside during the grow- 
ing season gives substance to the boast. Gardens, ranging from small 
plots to large lay-outs, are to be seen in all sections of the country. 
Something in our soil or climate seems to brighten the natural colors 
of flowers grown here, and even the most drab little plant can become 
an object of brightness. Of all the flowers grown here, none is more 
popular nor responds better to our environment than do Roses. 

Our earliest settlers must have brought roses with them when they 
arrived from their old homelands. Around the remains of old farm- 
house foundations, through old hedgerows and in odd corners, can be 
seen large clumps of old Briar roses that have grown wild for decades. 
Some of these have now reached a tremendous size, and when in 
bloom in June and July provide many lovely spots of color in the 
summer landscape. 

With the development of "Modern" roses, their use in gardens 
became general throughout the province, though no really large gar- 
dens were developed. It was not until the end of World War Two that 
growing of roses in gardens really caught on in a big way. At that time, 
Mr. Robert Cotton, who had long been interested in Rural Beautifica- 
tion donated monies to establish a Nursery that would make garden 
plants and shrubs readily available to people throughout the province. 
Under the direction of Mr. Robert Snazelle, and more recendy of Mr. 
Keith Brehaut, this nursery has more than fulfilled the hopes of its 
founder, and has been very heavily patronized by gardeners from all 
over the province. 

Roses have made up a very large part of the stock of the nursery, 



85 



and have been, in large part, imported directly from Holland and 
Germany. Roses reared in these countries, whose climatic conditions 
are similar to ours, seem to do well here, and to be much less suscep- 
tible to winterkill than do those from kindlier climates. Thus with a 
handy source of roses with a good chance to survive the winter, roses 
began appearing in gardens all over the province, in small groups in 
gardens, in foundation planting and in larger specialty gardens. 

Rose growing here, as elsewhere, is a challenging hobby, and not 
by any means, have all those who lightheartedly put in a few roses, 
stayed with the hobby after the first inevitable setback, and setbacks we 
do have. The really serious hardship that faces rose growers here is 
the conditions imposed by our winters and springs, and while it is usual 
to speak of winter-kill, in this area spring-kill would probably be a more 
accurate term. Our winters are not ordinarily very severe. Winter 
conditions usually do not come on until about Christmas. There is 
usually a satisfactory cover of snow and very few prolonged spells of 
sub-zero weather. The springs, though, are something else. The snow 
usually is gone by late March, and from then until late May, or later, 
we are subject to cold, damp, windy weather, and the roses that have 
responded to the few fine sunny days suffer repeated setbacks from the 
weather, and the mortality and morbidity from this treatment can be 
very high. The Winter and Spring of 1959 was particularly damaging, 
with losses averaging about 80 per cent, and in some gardens up to 
1 00 per cent. A lot of gardeners ceased to be rose growers that year, but 
those who returned to the fight after bleeding a while in the traditional 
manner, have been blessed with a succession of good years, with last 
year being the best ever, there being practically no loss. 

Winter protection here is, in general, provided in the usual man- 
ner with mounding of earth being the main feature. This winter Mr. 
Walter Gregor of Cornwall is experimenting with the use of plastic 
foam protective cones. His results will be watched with close interest. 

A hobby that demands as much from its devotees as rose growing 
does, depends upon the interest and enthusiasm of a hard core of 
experienced veterans to stimulate the flagging in moments of dis- 
couragement. That we have had such a group accounts for the con- 
tinuing high interest of many gardeners. Mr. Gordon Warren, while 
he was Horticulturist at the Experimental Farm, and before he left to 
become the C.B.C.'s Maritime Gardener in Halifax, Mr. Gordon 
Hughes, Mrs. Gordon MacMillan and Dr. F. W. Tidmarsh, have 



36 



been skilled growers for many years, and it is to them that must go the 
credit for the success that gardeners in Prince Edward Island have had 
in growing roses 



In my estimation the value of the Rose is in the glory of its individual 
flowers . . . the idea is not the Rose for the garden but the garden for 
the rose. 

A. FOSTER-MELLIAR 



Fame is the scentless sunflower, with gaudy crown of gold; 
But friendship is the breathing rose, with sweets in every fold 

OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES 



87 



The Nina Marshall Rose 



Margaret E. Dove 
Toronto, Ontario 

The many friends of Mrs. Harry P. Marshall have been delighted 
to learn that a new rose has been named the "Nina Marshall" to 
honour her in recognition of her constant and outstanding contribu- 
tions in the field of horticulture. 

Mrs. Marshall has held many offices in the Canadian Rose 
Society. Joining what was then known as the Ontario Rose Society 
in 1939, she became its president in 1954, during which year the 
Society became the Canadian Rose Society. She served as president 
of this Society during the year 1955 and has been a member of the 
Board of Directors since then to the present time. 

Throughout all these years Mrs. Marshall has been a member 
of the Society's Exhibition Committee and for a number of years 
acted as publicity chairman and programme convener. She also 
edited the Rose Bulletin for two years and has contributed articles on 
rose culture to many horticultural society annuals, Chatelaine 
Magazine and the National Gardener Bulletin of National Council 
of State Garden Clubs Inc., U.S.A. 

For a number of years Mrs. Marshall exhibited in both speci- 
men and decorative classes of the C.R.S. shows. For the last five 
years, however, she has served at such shows as a judge. 

Over the years she has represented the C.R.S. as a featured 
programme speaker in Canada and the United States and this fall 
will give a lecture demonstration on exhibiting, judging and the 
culture of roses at the School for Judges and Exhibitors of Horti- 
cultural Materials being held at the Royal Botanical Gardens, 
Hamilton, Ontario. 

Though roses are her first love, Mrs. Marshall is well qualified 
to give authentic horticultural information on many other phases of 
gardening as she has been an active member of the Scarborough 



88 



Horticultural Society, Scarborough, Ontario, since 1947 and a 
member of the Board of Directors for four years. 

A member of the Garden Club of Toronto for the past ten 
years, Mrs. Marshall has been active on executive committees in 
various capacities — convener of Horticulture, of Projects and of 
Publicity. She has edited the programme of the Club's annual Spring 
Flower Show. For her inspirational planning and fine creating of 
two educational and attractive spring gardens at the Annual Flower 
Show the Garden Club has twice been awarded the medal given by 
The National Council of State Garden Clubs U.S.A. for the out- 
standing horticultural section of a standard flower show. 

Mrs. Marshall has represented the Garden Club of Toronto 
as a judge at the Easter Floral Pageant in Bermuda. She is an 
accredited judge of flower arranging, G.C.O., and her simple 
approach to flower arranging, especially the arranging of roses, has 
made her popular as a guest speaker for programmes on floral art. 

The Nina Marshall rose is a cross between Queen of the Lakes 
and Serenade. It was bred by Mr. Adam Golik and brought to the 
Ellesmere Nurseries Limited, Brooklin, Ontario, for testing and 
introduction. 

In colour the rose is poppy red in a yellow setting. It has thirty 
petals and is sweetly perfumed. Growth is upright and the leaves 
firm and glossy. Mr. John Schloen, Ellesmere Nurseries, tells me 
that during this past summer (1966) the plant has borne many 
flowers and has stood up well under the intense heat in their gardens. 
He predicts that it should winter well. 

When the Ellesmere Nurseries were starting in the rose growing 
field, Mrs. Marshall, one of their first customers, supplied them with 
buds from her own garden. In naming a rose for Nina Marshall, Mr. 
Schloen has expressed in a tangible way the sentiments of friends 
and rose lovers. Mrs. Marshall has many gifts; among her greatest 
are the generous giving of her time and the sharing of her talents. 



We all love a pretty girl — 
89 



under the rose. 

ISAAC BIGKERSTAFFE 



The Problem of Rose Classification 



Dr. Griffith J. Buck 

Department of Horticulture, Iowa State U niversity, 
Ames, Iowa 

The rose has been the despair of taxonomists since the beginning of 
the science of plant classification. The genus is large and possesses 
many members which vary widely in their relationship to each other. 
Further, the members of the genus Rosa are prone to interhybridize 
with each other to produce progeny with varying degrees of resem- 
blance to either parent. The difficulty of classifying the wild (species) 
roses has been increased by the tendency to introduce into cultivation 
only the superior forms, usually with double flowers. 

If the wild roses pose a difficult problem in classification to the 
taxonomist, classification of the cultivated roses is every bit as difficult. 
This should come as no surprise, for no other group of plants provides 
as wide a range of plant, flowering and bloom traits; its closest com- 
petitor being the orchid which must divide its glories among several 
genera. 

Much of the difficulty in classifying garden rose cultivars lies in 
their inherent variability in response to climate and soils and the 
resultant loss or stimulation of vigor. Neither can the effect of the 
understock on vigor be discounted. A vigorous plant will have flower- 
ing characteristics quite different from one weakened by poor culture, 
the vagaries of climate or a poor root system. The vigor promoting 
effect of the understock is considered important enough that many 
rose testing programs require information on the understock used be 
supplied before a rose begins its test period. Also, the method of propa- 
gation can influence the growth habit of the plant. The example that 
comes to mind concerns the old rose 'Magnafrano' which, on its own 
roots, is a typical hybrid tea; when budded, it becomes a vigorous 
pillar rose. The effects of climatic conditions and cultural variations 
are clearly evident in the variance in the reports of a given rose 
cultivar's performance in the Proof of the Pudding. The cluster- 

90 



flowering trait in some of the contemporary floribunda roses is more 
pronounced on plants which are permitted by climate or intent to 
grow to large proportions. On those with reduced vigor the general 
effect is to diminish the cluster size to the minimum. 

Another factor relating to garden rose classification is that of 
ancestry. For many years it was assumed that the basis for the develop- 
ment of garden roses were species roses, the naturally occurring wild 
roses, native to Europe, Asia Minor and China: Rosa gallica, R. 
damascena, R. centifolia, R. alba, R. chinsensis and R. odorata. It 
has only been within comparatively recent years that cytologists have 
given us a solid basis for erecting the evolution of contemporary rose 
cultivars. Miss Wylie's excellent review of the evolution and develop- 
ment of garden roses** should be required reading for all rose growers. 

One might wonder, then, in view of these difficulties, why bother 
with classification at all. Is a system of classification for garden roses 
necessary? Who will benefit from it? 

Everyone working with roses — the gardener, nurseryman, 
plant breeder, exhibitor — benefits. The benefits come through 
providing a uniform basis for understanding the salient forms into 
which garden roses have evolved. Modern Roses V cataloged 7,562 
cultivars of roses exclusive of species, in 1958. Modern Roses VI has 
appeared since that date and the numbers of cultivars continue to 
climb. How could one work meaningfully with numbers of rose culti- 
vars of this magnitude? The principle of "divide and conquer" applies 
happily in this instance. By devising a system of pigeonholes in which 
rose cultivars with similar traits can be placed, the mass of material 
can be reduced to workable units. The basis for these subunits can be 
almost anything the classifier desires; i.e. use, parentage, flowering 
habit, etc. The most successful classification systems are those with a 
sufficient number of groups to encompass the variations within the 
group of plants being classified. 

Roses were a relatively unsophisticated plant group until about 
the second decade of this century. By this time the number of rose 
cultivars had proliferated outrageously; but even so, it was possible 
for the amateur to recognize a rose by examining its stem, leaves and 
inflorescence. This ability to recognize a rose was of value because each 

**See either Journal, Royal Horticultural Society, Vol. 79, part 12, 1954; Vol. 
80, parts 1 and 2, 1955 or American Rose Magazine, November, 1955 to 
April, 1956. 



91 



of the types had identifying characteristics which justified a particular 
method of culture. It is significant, too, that the cultivars of roses 
could be fairly easily linked with a parent botanical species or hybrid 
species group. 

The difficulty of grouping roses by means of botanical charac- 
teristics did not develop overnight. It began to be evident with the rise 
of the hybrid perpetuals and the teas. 

In an attempt to reduce the hybrid perpetuals to some sort of 
order, the "family system" was introduced. Thus, we had the 'Baronne 
Prevost' family of hybrid perpetuals, the 'General Jacqueminot' 
family, the 'La Reine 5 family, etc. In the tea roses there were two 
distinct types: the semi-double, small-flowered type of which 
'Safrano' is typical; and the substantial, very double flower typical of 
'Maman Cochet' and 'Etoile de Lyon'. There was no attempt to align 
tea rose cultivars into one or the other types. Apparently growers of 
tea roses knew the floral characteristics of each cultivar. Toward the 
end of the nineteenth century the development of breeding techniques, 
increasing knowledge of the potentials of plant breeding and the ever- 
present desire to improve the qualities of garden roses began to be 
evident, and the hybrid teas made their appearance. During the next 
half-century many rose groups were to appear and either be absorbed 
into older groups, remain viable for a time and disappear, or lay the 
foundation for further development. This was the period of the per- 
netiana, the lambertiana, Pemberton's and Thomas' hybrid musks, 
the polyantha and tea-polyantha, the rise of the multiflora and 
wichuraiana ramblers and climbers. Truly a time of ferment. 

"The mixture of strains having become accentuated in the thou- 
sands of crossings which have been made, it is no longer possible to 
classify roses on a basis of their botanical affiliations. 

"Nowadays, there are all manner of intermediate forms between 
the various strains of roses and their characters are so intermixed that 
they constitute a kind of 'garden rose' (Rosa x hortensis) rather like 
the garden gladioli which also combine in their heritage a whole series 
of botanical species which it is impossible to discern and trace in their 
new forms. 

"Since the old roses, those in which one could see the essential 
traits of the parent strain, no longer exist in the trade, or rarely, and 
are in fact only seldom to be found in any country, it is no longer neces- 
sary to have in commercial catalogs any classification which claims to 



92 



be botanical. The question of the classification of garden roses is 
reduced to establishing functional series and, actually, the question 
could never have been posed if rose growers had not given certain 
categories improper designations which add to the confusion and 
which should be suppressed without delay. A good example of this 
confusion is found in the two appellations 'dwarf roses' and 'miniature 
roses. 5 Obviously, the initiated know that the miniature rose is truly 
dwarf, praticularly when it is young, and that the dwarf rose is not, 
being on the contrary a normal rose forming a bush which is generally 
about 40 inches in height. But what an enigma for the amateur who is 
aided only by his good sense !" (Andre LeRoy, "The Classification of 
Roses," 1962, National Rose Annual.) 

The current system used in classifying garden roses has evolved 
slowly over the past century. Little has been done in a systematic way 
to bring it abreast of contemporary rose development. Instead there 
has occurred a class deletion here, an addition elsewhere, with little 
attention being given to the effect on the over-all system. The would-be 
classifier is truly fool-hardy who would attempt to discard abruptly a 
system, even though it is breaking down because of being out-of-step 
with the development of the flower, which does have meaning to 
gardeners and nurserymen. Rather, there should be an over-all review 
of the system in current use, and an analysis of its strengths and weak- 
nesses before any change is made. Also, an attempt must be made to 
retain that which is relevant and meaningful to provide a transition 
to any innovation considered essential. 

The names of rose classes have been evolved in haphazard, 
poorly co-ordinated ways. Some imply outdated or unrealistic lines 
of descent; others make use of Latin terms which do not describe 
adequately the salient characteristics; or are, at best, ambiguous. 
Nonetheless, in spite of their shortcomings, the names of our rose 
classes do have meaning to the lay public. It would be unwise to 
discard them at this time. At some future date the institution of rose 
class names with numerical or abstract bases may be desirable. If this 
should come about, it must be admitted that replacing those class 
names with which most rose growers have grown up and which fill the 
literature will remove much of the romance and feeling for continuity 
from gardening. 



93 



Arranging Roses 
in the Home Garden 

Theo Mayer, Editor 

r y*HE average grower who plans a new rose bed probably takes 
adequate pains with its location and with the preparation of the 
soil. When it comes, however, to the selection and arrangement of 
varieties to fill that bed, he often shows lamentable lack of judgment 
and foresight. If his bed was designed to accommodate twenty-four 
bushes, he will consult his catalogues and order one each of two dozen 
different varieties, which he will then plant haphazardly with a 
"hope-for-the-best" attitude. He will obtain bloom and colour for 
his pains, but the overall effect will be harsh and leave much to be 
desired. Such a rose bed will resemble a chorus line where all the 
girls are attired in costumes of different hue and texture, and where 
they are strung out willy nilly without any account being taken of 
the different heights. Beautiful girls they may be, and well worth an 
ogle, but theirs will never be the acclaim accorded to the Rockettes, 
whose on-stage appearances and routines are meticulously planned 
and co-ordinated. The following paragraphs contain a few sugges- 
tions, which, it is hoped, will enable the small grower to achieve 
something approaching the "Rockette" effect in his rose garden. 

Ideally, roses look their best when mass planted in individual 
beds of twenty or more bushes of one variety. Municipal rose gardens 
do this and the results are wonderful to behold. Of course, the space 
available to the small home gardener makes such arrangements all but 
impossible. While he could conceivably, having decided to grow 
eighty hybrid teas, lay out four beds each to accommodate twenty 
bushes of a particular variety, such a planting would spoil much of 
the fun of growing roses : most of the fine modern introductions, with 
their wonderful colour and form, would be absent from his garden. 
But it is still possible to grow quite a number of varieties and yet get 
a mass effect by the use of a compromise method which has worked to 



94 



advantage in my garden. This involves not the planting of single 
hybrid teas, but rather the grouping of varieties in fours in the form of 
a square. Thus a bed of thirty-two hybrid teas would contain eight 
different varieties. The overall appearance of such an arrangement 
is much more striking than that achieved by the planting of a large 
number of single specimens. The square arrangement is not man- 
datory, of course; many other groupings are possible. For example, 
bushes can be arranged in threes in the form of a triangle, or in fives in 
the form of a pentagon, in each case the apex representing the bush 
in front of the bed closest to the lawn, walk, etc. Even arranging 
varieties in twos, one behind the other, is preferable to a stringy line 
of singles. Depending on their habit and vigour, bushes should be 
planted eighteen inches to two feet apart. Try this grouping of bushes 
in your hybrid tea beds; the effect will surprise and please you. A note 
of caution here: while grandifloras can generally be mixed with 
hybrid teas, floribundas should not be. They should be planted in 
separate beds and their uses will be discussed later. 

The groups in the hybrid tea beds should be positioned according 
to height; that is the tallest growers, such as Pink Peace, should be in 
the middle of the bed, the lowest ones (e.g. The Doctor) at the ends, 
and those of medium height in intermediate spots. While catalogues 
and rose books will often indicate the height that a certain bush 
should attain, they are not always reliable guides; it is better that the 
gardener view the types he wants to grow the previous season at a 
friend's or nurseryman's. In this way he will be able to visualize his 
rose bed in advance, and this planning will give much greater satisfac- 
tion than a helter skelter arrangement. 

Arrangement by colours is to a large degree subjective (beauty, 
after all, is in the eye of the beholder) , so that no absolute criteria can 
be given. However, a few guidelines can be laid down, and these, if 
followed, should improve the aesthetic appeal of the plantings. In 
general, adjacent groups should contrast in colour and not blend. Two 
reds, such as Ena Harkness and Konrad Adenauer, should not be 
placed side by side; some strongly contrasting colour (e.g. the yellow 
King's Ransom ) next to a red makes for a sparkling display. Whites, 
such as Matterhom and Virgo, can be used almost anywhere, and are 
particularly valuable for separating two groups of a similar colour. 
The new mauve shades, such as Sterling Silver or Simone, are inter- 
esting but show to best advantage when placed next to strong dark 



95 



colours; they appear washed out if planted adjacent to the lighter pink 
shades. 

As recommended previously, floribundas should not be planted 
in hybrid tea beds. However, the grower will find many uses for 
these colourful roses. Planted in narrow beds along the foundation of 
a house, or beside a walk, fence or driveway, they can afford a won- 
derful display. A small group of them, placed in an arc, can be ideal 
to divide two hybrid tea beds set at right angles to each other. The 
ingenuity of the individual grower will suggest many other uses for this 
class of roses. I have found floribundas particularly effective when 
planted in a line beside walks or fences. Only one variety — and this 
must be stressed — should be used in one location; don't mix your 
floribundas. Fifteen Pinocchio, all of uniform height, arranged in a 
line beside your walk, will give a much better display than fifteen 
different floribundas, of different height and habit. Grandifloras may 
be grouped in beds with hybrid teas, or they may be employed in the 
same manner as floribundas. A tall grower such as Queen Elizabeth is 
excellent to cover a fence. I have used it for this purpose, and have also 
planted twelve of them in a line beside my driveway to good effect. 

Other types of roses can also play a part in the home owner's 
garden. Climbers can be used on the walls of the house or to cover 
fences, while a standard placed in a corner, or in the center of a hybrid 
tea bed, etc., will add variety to the overall scheme. Climbers and 
standards are, of course, troublesome to protect for winter, so that any 
large-scale planting of these types is not recommended in the colder 
areas of Canada. Shrub roses, such as Hansa, Blanc Double de 
Coubert, or some of the newer Kordes' creations, can be planted as 
specimens or employed to form hedges. Miniatures are most effective 
in window boxes or in the rock garden. 

As to the choice of specific varieties for the various beds, there 
are dozens of excellent ones available, and the grower's personal tastes 
will dictate his selection. Catalogues are helpful but they should always 
be read with a most critical eye. It is better to visit various rose 
gardens where most varieties can be seen and evaluated. A small area 
of the garden — I have such a spot behind a line of floribundas — 
can be set aside to try out single specimens of some of the new intro- 
ductions that appear each year. Another point should be made here : 
don't be shy to get rid of and replace with something else any variety 
that does not perform well. The few dollars involved will be well 



96 



spent. In short, keep your garden up to date ; change it occasionally by 
removing any weak or unattractive sisters. 

So, then, when choosing and arranging bushes in your rose 
garden, plan in advance, and plan carefully. You'll be glad that 
you did. 



You may break, you may shatter the vase if you will, 
But the scent of the roses will hang round it still. 

THOMAS MOORE 



97 



The Rose in Sunny Queensland 



Hugh Graham,, President 
National Rose Society of Queensland 

If you peruse the map of Australia you cannot help but notice one 
very large State which occupies the whole of the north-eastern corner 
of the Continent. This is the State of Queensland. It is the second 
largest State in the Commonwealth, and one of the richest and most 
beautiful. 

Should you look more closely at your atlas you will see that over 
half of Queensland lies north of the Tropic of Capricorn. The re- 
mainder lies within the temperate zone. You will also observe that 
Queensland has a very long coastline — over 3,000 miles of it, in fact. 
Because of their proximity to the sea, many parts of Queensland are 
much cooler than might otherwise be expected from its tropical/ sub- 
tropical location. 

This means that Queensland has a healthy climate in which 
people can live in much more comfort than is usual in tropical/ sub- 
tropical countries. We are fortunate to live in a country where, even 
in the southern part of the State, the winter is short and pleasantly 
warm — temperatures rarely drop below 60° F., except for early 
winter mornings, and daytime temperatures are usually in the seven- 
ties or higher, even in midwinter. The summers are hot and humid 
along the coast, averaging 80° to 86° in January. 

Rainfall in all regions is usually confined to the four summer 
months from December to March. The rest of the year has a sparsity 
of rainfall, our warm dry winters being one of Queensland's great 
attractions. 

What, then, of rose growing in this land with a "glass-house type 
of climate", so different from the climes where the rose had its origin? 
It is, indeed, a perennial in Queensland and, as such, its cultivation is 
directed to produce blooms at all times. 

The rose can be safely planted here in Queensland for about 26 
weeks in the year, but I personally favour the time between mid-May 



98 



and the end of August — approximately 15 weeks. Bushes planted in 
August should give their first blooms in early October, and their gen- 
eral growth should be fairly rapid. Unless the variety has a spreading 
habit in development, it is not unusual for our plants to grow to 6 feet 
in the first twelve months. 

General pruning is also timed for the last weeks of July or the 
early part of August. However, bushes can be producing blooms of 
very good quality at this time, and it is a common sight to see, in our 
members' gardens, bushes pruned to a stage where one or more longer 
canes remain untouched because of an exhibition bloom, or a nice fat 
bud in early stage of development, crowning the top. The exhibitor is 
cautious not to waste blooms that could be prize-winners at the 
monthly shows. Of course, when these blooms are picked the pruning 
of the bush in then completed. 

The rose blooming cycle, as everywhere, begins with the Spring 
flush which usually occurs the last week in September or the first week 
in October — the N.R.S.Q. Open Spring Show is always held on 
the first Saturday of October. Members of our Society endeavour to 
prune to meet this target date with their top Spring flush — a period 
of 9 to 10 weeks seems to be as close as one can gauge to achieve this 
goal. 

The Spring flush is heavy, although possibly not as dense as those 
of the colder lands of Canada, England and the extreme southern 
parts of our own Australia. Nevertheless, our bushes present a further 
flush in roughly eight weeks, to be followed by other successive flushes 
at approximately the same intervals. Whilst these flushes more or less 
occur at these regular intervals, our rose gardens are never without 
colour between times. Admittedly the blooms are generally smaller 
in the hotter months of December to February, but there are several 
varieties, such as Montezuma, Mascotte, Chrysler Imperial, etc., 
which give of their best at these times. 

Because of the prolonged blooming season, the feeding of our 
roses is somewhat different from the fertilizing methods adopted in 
other lands. It would seem that, in our warm temperate land, an 
abundance of watering, complemented with feeding at six-weekly 
intervals, is essential to obtain the continuous blooming we associate 
with roses in Queensland. 

Our feeding programme encompasses the use of both organic 
and inorganic fertilizers — one is not adequate on its own. Most 

99 



growers would give two applications of animal manure a year, usually 
August and March. This is then supplemented with the regular 
dosages of Nitro-phosca or other well-balanced rose mixtures mar- 
keted by our Chemical Fertilizer Companies. 

Mulching is an important aspect in the growing of roses in our 
warm land. The usual forms used by the roseman are straw, coffee 
grounds, pine needles, leather grinding, or lawn clippings. Copious 
application of these mulches (usually 4 to 6 inches spread completely 
over the rose beds) keeps the soil moist and cool in our longer warm 
days, and yet relatively warm in our short winter. Of course, if it were 
not for the constant use of mulch our weeding labours would be 
immense. 

In Queensland the rose is besieged by the enemies it encounters 
in most countries. The chief diseases that have to be constantly kept 
at bay are Mildew, Blackspot and Scale. Mildew is the most prevalent 
and appears at any time of the year. Blackspot invariably appears with 
the late Spring and Summer. This is due principally to the normal 
weather pattern — thunderstorms in the late afternoons of November 
and December, followed by our "wet" season from January to March, 
precipitate ideal conditions for Blackspot infestations. 

The Spring is also heralded with the arrival of the pest population. 
Aphids, loopers, beetles of many forms, would soon turn the rose gar- 
dens into a skeleton maze if regular spraying is not performed. Our 
most persistent and difficult 'antagonist', however, is the red spider 
mite. His habitat is on the underside of the leaves and, unfortunately, 
our chemists have not produced a systemic spray to eradicate this 
interloper. Rogor 40 and Meta-Systox, once effective on the Queens- 
land red spider, are now useless against him. The contact sprays, 
Kelthane and Tedion, do kill, but to spray the underside of the leaves 
of our rose bushes is much more arduous work than carrying out 
normal spraying. 

However, these trials of disease and pests pale into insignificance 
when one reaps the rewards of his labours — a rose garden in con- 
tinuous bloom. Certain varieties are much quicker to repeat their 
flushes than others. El Capitan and Roundelay are exceptionally pro- 
fuse, and under normal circumstances barely seven weeks elapse be- 
tween flushes. Mascotte is a real favourite for its potential as a dual 
purpose rose — exhibition and decorative. It also repeats itself in the 
short space of seven weeks. Columbus Queen, Queen Elizabeth, 



100 



Tiffany, Christian Dior, Confidence and Peace are slower to produce 
their follow-on flushes, taking approximately eight weeks. 

Over the years experience has demonstrated that, with a few ex- 
ceptions, roses with 30 petals or more are the best suited to our warm 
sunny conditions. Varieties which our rosarian friends of cooler parts 
report do not hold very well in their gardens, are sure to be fleeting in 
our neck of the woods. Ernest H. Morse is a recent example of this. 
Here in Queensland we have found that the roses which do well or 
have been propagated in Southern California also> grow well for us, and 
appear to require a shorter time to become acclimatized to our con- 
ditions. 

The growing of roses in Queensland in the 140 years since our 
earliest settlement has not captivated the minds and hearts of our 
fellow citizens as much as other hobbies. This, the true rosarian claims, 
is due to the mistakes in the techniques adopted by our forefathers to 
grow roses in this land where conditions have proved to be so different 
from their homelands. 

Naturally, our early settlers, who brought the love of roses with 
them to their new land, also brought the methods of culture known to 
them in their homelands. Amazingly the rose still grew — unfortu- 
nately not as well as they had known roses to grow. Thus, the fallacy 
was born that roses grow only in cool to cold areas. 

The National Rose Society of Queensland is still fighting this 
heresy and is constantly endeavouring to preach and teach the true 
story of how to grow roses in a tropical/sub-tropical land. I hope I 
would not be misjudged as being boastful or egotistic when I claim that 
the N.R.S.Q. is the only Society in the world that conducts ten shows 
a year, for it is a fact that every meeting of our group (March to 
December each year) is a Rose Show. This, I am confident, is respon- 
sible for the large monthly attendances at our Shows (approximately 
160). 

However, we of the N.R.S.Q. realize the real challenge which is 
ours — to convince our fellow countrymen of the joys and pleasure 
that can be theirs in a rose garden. Despite the splendid results of our 
labours to date, the call of our sun-drenched beaches and the enervat- 
ing effect of our 'lotos-type' weather will remain our greatest obstacles. 



101 



Progress in 
Hardy Everblooming Roses 

Percy H. Wright 
Saskatoon, Sask. 

It wasn't too long ago that a writer in one of the American Rose 
Society's publications stated categorically that the combination of 
hardiness and everblooming in rose plants was impossible, and that 
the search for it was futile. At the time this article was written, 
varieties which possessed the combination were already in existence. 

The roses which have combined hardiness with everblooming 
are mostly rugosa hybrids. Of all the northern species which are 
capable of transmitting hardiness to their progeny, rugosa exhibits the 
most remarkable ability to do so without loss of fall bloom in the 
hybrids. It is possible that suffulta may be an exception to this 
statement. 

As Dr. W. Van Fleet pointed out in an American Rose Annual 
published before 1920, rugosa reveals certain highly dominant 
characters which are the price paid for the combination of hardiness 
and everblooming, particularly short and weak flower stems and 
excessive thorniness. Even after rugosa has had repeated infusions of 
the genes of other tender roses, to the point that practically all gain 
of hardiness is forfeit, these undesirable features persist to some extent. 
Dr. Van Fleet was of the opinion that the breeding of Rugosa Hybrids 
had at that time reached a cul-de-sac definite enough to suggest that 
some other approach should be attempted. 

Since 1920, hybrids between Hybrid Teas and numerous 
species roses other than rugosa have been made, and from the crosses 
much experience has been gained. In general it has been found that 
the genes of these other species do not result in the transmission of so 
many undesirable features as the genes of rugosa do, but that they 
dominate the hybrids much more as regards June blooming. In 



102 



other words, the combination which is really sought is threefold, 
hardiness, everblooming, and a large number of good qualities. 
Naturally, a triple combination is much harder to achieve than a 
double one — especially when the third one is itself far from simple. 

How do the Rugosa Hybrids, or some of the more remarkable 
ones among them, manage to achieve the combination of hardiness 
and everblooming which was assumed to be impossible? In seeking 
an answer to this intriguing question, let's look at the well known 
rugosas Hansa, Mrs. Anthony Waterer, and Kamschatica, all rather 
similar and all remarkably hardy. 

The secret of the combination appears to be in the ability of 
these varieties to use the first light frosts of autumn as warnings to 
harden up their tissues for the much deeper freezes to come. June- 
blooming roses do it by ceasing to grow and produce blossoms and 
new wood as fall approaches, but the everblooming roses are auto- 
matically denied this "normal" method of attaining dormancy. 

One year in the early 1950s, when the writer lived near Carrot 
River in northeastern Saskatchewan, warm weather persisted to 
October 15, and Hansa plants were in full bloom and actively pro- 
ducing buds at that date. Then the winds changed direction, and the 
winter descended all in one foul blow. That year the Hansa roses 
were killed to within an inch or two of the ground, and many other 
roses normally hardy were injured also. 

The prairie tetraploid species, suffulta, easier to blend with 
Hybrid Teas to produce fertile or partly fertile hybrids than rugosa 
just because it is a tetraploid, has recently been used in crosses with 
both Hybrid Teas and Floribundas, crosses which seem to be easy 
enough to achieve if suffulta is used as the pollen parent. One of the 
most interesting of the Suffulta Hybrids, Assmiboine, was origin- 
ated when H. Marshall of the Brandon Experimental Farm put 
pollen of suffulta on the pistils of Donald Prior. Assiniboine is of 
very different character from the rugosa hybrids, and better in several 
important characters. It is, however, less hardy than Hansa. When 
moisture is sufficient, it re-blooms profusely in August, at least in the 
latitude of northern Saskatchewan. Since its male parent Donald 
Prior is only a semidouble, Assiniboine is semidouble too. This defect 
will almost certainly be remedied in future breeding. 

The species suffulta is really a remarkable one, since in its 
natural and unimproved state it too combines hardiness with fall 



103 



blooming. Its use in making hybrids with Floribundas and Hybrid 
Teas is too recent to say definitely what its limitations are likely to be. 
However, the reduced hardiness of the first-generation hybrids is 
pronounced enough as to suggest that second-generation hybrids 
(three-quarters tender rose and one-quarter suffulta) will not be 
nearly hardy enough for the climate of the prairie provinces, although 
it may be enough to bring joy to rose growers in climates where 
winters are only a little too severe for Hybrid Teas. 

This assumption suggests that, as far as the colder areas of 
Canada are concerned, further Suffulta Hybrids will have to have 
at least as strong an infusion of suffulta genes as Assiniboine itself, 
even though they may be segregates in the second generation. 

But what possibilities remain for the use of rugosa in the 
breeding of hardy everblooming roses? It would appear that if Rosa 
rugosa is first crossed with Rosa blanda, and then this hybrid is bred 
to Hybrid Teas of Floribundas, the dominance of rugosa's weak 
bud-stems and excessive thorniness is broken much more effectively 
than if repeated infusions are made with the tender roses to a similar 
degree of loss of hardiness. 

The rose Therese Bugnet, which most of us regard as a Blanda 
Hybrid rather than a Rugosa Hybrid, is an example of the truth of 
the foregoing assertion. Its percentage of rugosa, however, is sub- 
stantial, and it is to the rugosa element in its make-up that the fall 
blooming habit of the variety is due. The limited number of seedlings 
of Therese Bugnet raised to date suggests that the combination of good 
features achieved in it was due to an extremely rare and felicitous 
segregation, but this is no reason, of course, why the line should not 
be followed much further. 



He who would have beautiful roses in his garden must have beautiful 
roses in his heart. 

DEAN HOLE 



104 



The Aphids and Their Control 



Orville E. Bowles 

Leaside, Ontario 

Everyone who has grown garden roses will be quite well acquainted 
with aphids, the colony-living, small sucking insects also known as 
green flies or plant lice. They have very complex life histories and 
are amongst the most injurious, the most puzzling, and as we shall 
see the most interesting insects. 

There are hundreds of known species making up the family 
Aphididae and while there are wide variations in the life cycles there 
is quite a definite pattern to their behavior. Several species prey on 
both cultivated and wild roses but the most common species found 
on the garden rose is Macrosiphum rosae (L), more commonly known 
as the rose aphid. This is a serious pest distorting and stunting foliage 
and flower buds; the rose leaves are often so distorted and curled 
that they are unable to function properly. A serious infestation can 
withdraw so much sap that the vigor of the bush is seriously affected 
and premature leaf fall may occur. Such bushes are frequently 
susceptible to winterkill. 

They are of the widely distributed order Hemiptera, sub-order 
Homoptera, having mouthparts capable of piercing the tissues of 
plants and extricating sap. Instead of jaws they have a piercing and 
sucking beak which can be thrust deep into the tissues of a leaf or 
stem. There are two canals in the beak and through one a liquid 
secretion from the salivary glands of the head is injected into the 
plant, perhaps breaking down the tissue. Through the other the sap 
is drawn into the mouth and stomach. 

The aphid is a soft-bodied insect, minute and delicate with a 
small head, six legs, a large abdomen and conspicuously long antennae. 
The body might be described as pear shaped. Also conspicuous are 
two black cornicles or honey tubes extending rearwards from the 
abdomen. The wingless female is usually green or pinkish with a 
yellowish-green tail; the winged members, green or reddish in color, 



105 



have four wings which when at rest are folded roof-like over the 
body. 

In the preparation of this digest the writer has studied many of 
the reports of scientists who have done extensive research on the 
various species of aphids but there always seemed to be a lack of 
definite information as to the use and purpose of the cornicles. In 
requesting further information from the Department of Zoology, 
University of Guelph, we were grateful to receive the following report. 

"Some species of aphids lack cornicles and in others they are 
reduced in size. The question of function has not been definitely 
established in all cases but the generally accepted hypothesis is that 
glandular secretions exude from the cornicles under certain circum- 
stances. The secretions (wax-like) may offer some protection from 
predatory or parasitic insects or other enemies or in other cases form 
a thread-like tangle or covering over their bodies which may provide 
some protection both from the elements and from enemies. 

"Honeydew is the sweet fluid secreted or excreted through the 
anus or terminal portion of the alimentary canal. At one time it was 
thought that the cornicles produced the honeydew but Horvath 
( 1 904 ) was the first to observe otherwise." 

While they are practically defenseless they seem to defy extermin- 
tion due to their terrific rate of reproduction and the fact that a good 
deal of their life cycle is spent on weeds, wild growth and other 
uncultivated vegetation where they are not molested except by their 
predators. 

The aphid is probably best known for the secretion of this 
honeydew, the sticky liquid that hardens with a shiny surface as it 
exudes from the anus — not the cornicles as already pointed out — 
and is fed upon by ants, bees and other insects. It contains various 
carbohydrates such as cane, fruit and malt sugars, amongst others. 
Several theories have been advanced to account for this copious 
secretion and one is that the sap sucked up by the aphids is rich in 
sugars but poor in albumen and in order to obtain enough of the 
latter an over sufficiency of sugars is taken in and the surplus secreted. 
This secretion provides a medium favorable to the growth of non- 
parasitic fungi known as sooty-moulds. The presence of this soot- 
like deposit on the foliage and shoots is unsightly and hinders the 
normal functions — assimilation and respiration — of the leaf. 

A common fault among rose growers is excessive feeding 



whereby the bushes are supplied with large amounts of nitrogenous 
matter without the balancing and moderating effects of phosphorous 
and potash. This encourages the production of soft, sappy growth 
which is favored by these sap sucking insects. 

Virus diseases may be transmitted from one plant to another 
by aphids which insert their needle-like mouth parts into tissues of 
an infected plant and suck up the sap. When they subsequently feed 
on other plants they infect the tissues with the virus. A great deal of 
harm has been done to field crops through infection spread in this 
manner but fortunately diseases common to the rose do not appear 
to be transmitted in this manner. 

LIFE CYCLE 

In early spring when we are pruning our rose bushes if we have 
sharp eyes, or use a magnifying glass, we are likely to find a number 
of shiny, black specks about the base of the buds. Each little speck 
is oval and to the touch are firm but elastic. These are aphid eggs 
and each tiny capsule contains a young aphid. The egg was deposited 
last fall by a female aphid and its living contents have remained alive 
since then although fully exposed to the severity of winter. The date 
of hatching will depend on the weather and will vary according to 
the temperature but most will hatch during April-May. The final 
development of the aphid embryo keeps pace with the development 
of the rose buds and since both are controlled by the same weather 
conditions the young aphid on hatching finds itself conveniently 
handy to the opening buds and the delicate new leaves upon which 
the bush depends for a proper start of its spring growth. 

The full-grown insects of this first generation (Fundatrices), 
those produced from the winter eggs, are entirely wingless and they 
are all females. This state of affairs in no wise hinders the multiplica- 
tion of the species for these remarkable females are able to produce 
offspring, a faculty known as parthenogenesis, and furthermore they 
do not lay eggs but give birth to active young. This process is known 
as viviparity, and since these original females (Fundatrices) are 
destined to give rise to a long line of summer generations, frequently 
reaching up to fourteen, they are known as stem mothers. 

The stem mothers begin giving birth to young about twenty-four 
hours after reaching maturity and any one of the mothers, during 
the course of her life of from ten to thirty days, may produce an 
average family or fifty or more daughters for all her offspring are 



107 



females too. These stem mothers may give birth to a dozen or more 
young in the course of twenty-four hours, so that the mother is 
quickly surrounded by a little flock of young aphids. 

When these daughters grow up most of them will be wingless 
(Fundatrigeniae) but others will have well developed wings capable 
of flight (Migrantes). While this insect is not much of a flyer the 
rising wind currents frequently carry it up for a mile or so in the sky 
and as far as fifty miles. In the evening the rising currents subside 
and the aphids gradually descend. Both the winged and the wingless 
individuals of this second generation are also partheno genetic and they 
give birth to a third generation (Alienicolae) like themselves, includ- 
ing wingless, half -winged, and fully-winged forms but with a greater 
proportion of the latter. 

From now on there follows a large number of such generations 
continuing through the season, the winged forms flying from one bush 
to another and founding new colonies. 

Most species of aphids, including Macrosiphum rosae(L), 
migrate in early summer from their primary hosts — usually of a 
woody nature e.g. rose bushes, other shrubs and trees — to secondary 
summer food plants which are usually succulent annual and herb- 
aceous vegetation, both cultivated and wild growth. 

During the early part of the summer the rate of production 
rapidly increases in the aphid colonies and individuals of the summer 
generations sometimes give birth to young a week after they them- 
selves were born. In the fall, however, the period of growth is 
lengthened and the families drop off in size until the last females of 
the season produce a scant half half dozen young each, though they 
may live to a much greater age than do the summer individuals. 

All through the summer the colonies have consisted exclusively 
of virgin females, winged and wingless, that give birth to virgin 
females in ever increasing numbers. When summer's warmth gives 
way to the chills of autumn, and the food supply begins to fail as the 
sap in the herbaceous summer food plants starts to diminish, the birth 
rate slackens and falls off steadily until extermination seems to 
threaten. And then, once more, we see the miracle of instinct or 
direction. A weed or other herbaceous growth, which will be cut 
down with the advent of frost and winter snows, is no fit place for 
the storage of winter eggs so the remaining winged females 
(Sexuparae) now return to the primary woody-natured hosts. 

108 



Another interesting occurrence takes place and the next genera- 
tions born on these primary host plants are sexual (Sexuales) com- 
posed of both females and males. The females are wingless and differ 
from their virgin mothers and grandmothers in being of a darker 
green color and in having a broader pear-shaped body. The males 
are winged and much smaller and their color is yellowish brown or 
brownish green. Soon the females begin to produce, not active 
young but eggs which are deposited in crevices where the bark is 
rough usually close to dormant buds. The eggs are mostly laid in 
October and are at first a pale straw color but soon become shiny 
black. There are not many of them as each female lays only from 
one to a dozen, but it is these eggs that are to remain on the bushes 
through the winter, that produce the stem mothers of the following 
spring and thus start another cycle of aphid life, repeating that which 
has just closed. 

The production of sexual forms in the fall in temperate climates 
seems to have a direct relation to the lower temperatures. In the 
tropics the aphid succession continues indefinitely through partheno- 
genetic females and in most tropical species sexual males and females 
are unknown. In the warmer regions of the southwest coast of the 
United States species that regularly produce males and females every 
fall in the east continue without a reversion to the sexual forms. 

PREDATORS 

In addition to several birds, most notably the sparrows, some 
seventy predatory and parasitic insects help to keep the aphids in 
check. Only a few of these will be found around roses bushes and 
we will take a look at them. The crowded aphid colonies exposed on 
stems and leaves form the happy hunting ground for many of their 
enemies. Here are thousands of soft-bodied creatures all herded 
together and each tethered to one spot by its beak thrust deep into the 
tissues of the plant, making them particularly vulnerable to their 
predators. As we have mentioned they are practically defenseless 
and only their terrific rate of reproduction insures them against 
extinction. 

Foremost among the predators we are likely to see around 
colonies of aphids on our roses would be the adult Ladybird beetles, 
especially the species Adalia bipunctata (L) known as Two Spot, and 
their larvae. The adult beetles are quite well known and easily 
identified but the slate-grey, alligator-shaped larva with reddish- 



109 



brown spots are not so well known. It has six legs which enables it 
to travel much faster than the larva of most beetles. It feeds 
voraciously and consumes upwards of twenty aphids a day. It is in 
this larval state that it is most beneficial as a predator although in the 
adult stage it continues to destroy upwards of a dozen of these insects 
daily. (See 'Beneficial Insects' Year Book of The Canadian Rose 
Society 1958.) 

Also well known and commonly found around rose bushes are 
the Hover Flies of the family Syrphidae. These flies are given this 
common name due to their habit of hovering over foliage infested 
with aphids. The adult flies feed upon the honeydew while the 
sluglike larvae, without legs, feed ravenously on the young aphids. 
During the period of feeding and development each larva may 
consume up to 400 aphids. 

Somewhat less known, but still an important predator, are the 
Lacewing-flies of the family Chrysopidae and their larvae which are 
long bodied and bear very long sickle-shaped mandibles by means 
of which they seize and drain the body contents of their prey. Owing 
to these formidable mandibles and the aggressiveness of the larvae 
in attacking the aphids they are often termed 'aphis-lions'. 

These are the most important of the rose aphid predators but 
in addition to these predaceous creatures that attack and eat them 
alive the plant lice have other enemies. Probably the most important 
would be a common wasp-like parasite called Aphidius. The female 
through the use of a long, sharp ovipositor inserts an egg into the 
body of a living aphid where it hatches and the larva grows to 
maturity feeding on the juices and tissues of its host. If you look over 
the aphid infested leaves of your rose bushes you will notice here and 
there the dried empty straw colored skins of dead aphids that have 
been skeletonized by these parasites. 

Notwithstanding their terrific rate of reproduction the aphid 
colonies are greatiy depleted during a season favorable to the 
predaceous and parasitic insects that attack them. However, no 
species is ever annihilated by its enemies, the laws of compensation 
usually maintain a balance in nature between the procreative and 
destructive forces. 

CONTROL 

Despite these natural checks cultivated roses become heavily 
infested with aphids owing chiefly to the late appearance in the 



110 



season of their predatory and parasitic enemies. It is essential there- 
fore to take direct action against these pernicious pests, and to act 
early in the season before large populations are built up. It is 
necessary to make continued applications of contact or systemic sprays 
to control fresh invasions from wild roses, weeds, and from neighbor- 
ing bushes in those gardens where control measures are not taken by 
their custodians. The winged individuals are continually moving from 
bush to bush, and garden to garden, establishing new colonies. 

Many of the insects attacking roses have biting and chewing 
mouthparts and swallow the masticated pieces. For these we use a 
stomach or internal poison such as DDT for effective control. We 
have, however, noted that the aphids have piercing and sucking 
mouthparts and since they do not ingest or swallow any of the surface 
poison sprayed or dusted on the foliage they have to be controlled by 
contact or systemic preparations. 

Insects breathe differently than the higher animals and possess 
a series of holes (spiracles) arranged along the sides of the body 
through which air is taken and distributed throughout the organism 
in fine tubes in a manner comparable to the distribution of blood 
through arteries and veins in the higher animals. This specialized 
form of respiration is an important factor in designing insecticides to 
control such pests as having sucking mouthparts. Probably our most 
effective spray in use against aphids is malathion which is absorbed 
through the respiratory system producing suffocation or paralysis of 
the nervous system. It may be obtained separately and will be 
found as an important ingredient in most of the modern patented 
insecticide preparations. It is one of the safest of our modern insecti- 
cides as far as pets, children, and the applicator are concerned. 
Further, it has no injurious effect on song birds or wild life if direc- 
tions are followed. 

For aphid and other sucking insect control a high percentage 
of up-to-date rose gardeners have switched to systemic insecticides. 
These new products are being used as foliar sprays, bark painting, 
soil drench and granular applications on the ground around the rose 
bush. Regardless of the form of application, and some lend them- 
selves better to one form than another, the insecticide enters the sap 
stream of the bush through the absorption of the leaves, bark or roots 
and is translocated to all parts of the bush ; including the tender new 
growth so favored by the aphid. 



Ill 



The absorbed insecticide is not affected by rain, sunlight or 
heat and these applications give up to six weeks protection and are 
of great help and convenience to those gardeners who find weekly 
spraying all but impossible. When using surface poison or contact 
sprays we have to be careful not to miss any part of the foliage if our 
application is to have maximum results. Even with extreme care it 
is very easy for aphids to be concealed in the folds of the young 
leaves and not reached by the spray resulting in the build up of a 
colony in a very short time. This extreme care is not essential when 
using the systemic preparations. 

If possible our rose bushes should be inspected daily; the spent 
bloom and surplus buds removed and a close examination made for 
signs of insects or disease. When making such inspections a bottle 
spray is very handy and effective in preventing colony formations 
between regular sprayings. The pressurized cans or bombs con- 
taining insecticides are very good but in some cases very hard on the 
young growth. 

All forms of application have their supporters. A systemic 
applied to the soil, or painted on the canes above the soil line, will not 
affect the beneficial insects we have mentioned. To what extent 
soil applications may affect the animals in the soil has not been 
ascertained to any appreciable extent. 

Many of these new systemics when used as a foliar spray do 
have a contact effect similar to malathion up to the time they are 
absorbed into the bush. For this reason they are no safer to beneficial 
insects than insecticides of short residual control. However, if a 
comparison is drawn between the effects of systemic and surface acting 
insecticides it is very evident that the former are much less likely to 
cause serious harm to predators, even if there is some initial kill. 
Since predators do not usually congregate in any numbers on roses 
until the pest infestations have reached serious proportions, applica- 
tions of the systemic before or in the early stages of infestation will 
further minimize the risk of harm being done to the beneficial insects. 

Owing to the effect of these contact insecticides on all insects, 
sap sucking or chewing, as we have noted in the action of malathion, 
when the applications are made to the foliage and aerial parts of the 
rose the bushes are cleaned of all insect life, both beneficial and 
injurious. 



112 



Survival 



W. Ready 
Saskatoon, Sask. 

In that one word, survival, is the key to the hopes and expectations 
of rose enthusiasts here on the Saskatchewan prairie. It is a grouse 
among the prairie born that 'She's a great next year country'. But 
even those of us who are living in the cities are close enough to the land 
by fact and inheritance to take our disappointment with a grunt, a 
wary glance at the sky and a gentle chiding of the good earth with the 
toe of a boot. 

Most rose cataloguers are honest about their wares and some 
include hardiness charts and ratings for the roses they sell. The charts 
inevitably show that as far as most roses are concerned the prairie is a 
grand country for wheat. Now this does not prevent roses from being 
grown by the tens of thousands, but it does almost guarantee a lively 
annual market. When compared to petunias and marigolds, roses as 
annuals come in the luxury bracket, and if it were not for the rose's 
beauty and elegance they would sell like snowballs in January. 

The sight of a dew-diamonded Ena Harkness in the early morn- 
ing would make a poet groan for words, but, alas, like most of her 
gorgeous sisters she is seldom more than a tourist, a summer's guest. 

Rose literature is sprinkled with articles on how to keep rose 
bushes over winter and over a period of time I've tried most of the 
suggested procedures. The thing that is very puzzling (not to say 
annoying) is that no matter what system I have used the results were 
always inconsistent. Out of a dozen bushes prepared following a 
certain method the survival rate would vary from three to nine bushes 
with neither rhyme nor reason. One Baccara lived four years and 
survived three different types of protection before it gave up. I had a 
short border of China Dolls that were pure joy for three years and in 
the fourth spring all but one were dead and the lone survivor bloomed 
beautifully for two more summers. Obviously the temperament of the 



113 



country did not suit the temperament of the tender roses. Rugosa 
type roses are quite common in the area and undoubtedly they will 
survive almost any sort of rough treatment. Added to this undeniable 
\irtue is the fact that they are often as rough as their treatment. There 
are Canadian originated roses that overcome the environment and are 
worthy of keeping. The best I have found to date is Therese Bugnet. 
She is a delightful semi-double pink which blooms profusely in June 
and July and maintains enough bloom throughout the season to be 
interesting and decorative. Usually the last flower in the garden is a 
Therese. The new wood, which is thorn-free, has a dark red bark that 
is not only attractive when the foliage is gone but has for me a par- 
ticular charm when I see it protruding through two feet of snow and 
know that it is taking no harm. 

Although there were suitable hardy roses available I couldn't 
escape from the notion that there must be a wider range of types that 
had the gumption to weather our climate. In my reading I kept bump- 
ing into references to Moss roses. After digging further into the subject 
it seemed to me that this comparatively ancient race must have 
survived some rugged times to arrive on the modern scene. Out came 
the catalogues and an order for a dozen Moss roses brought the 
plants to my door in season. I had never seen a Moss rose, but in my 
ignorance these rather ugly specimens were carefully planted. They 
grew and after a fashion they bloomed. Their blooms identified 
them. Moss roses they were not and the few that survived the winter 
were removed from the bed and their exquisitely thorny bodies fed the 
bonfire. By the time the 'next year' rolled around I had been having 
correspondence with R. Harkness & Go. of Hitchin, Herts. It is worthy 
to note here that this company treated my inquiries and eventual small 
order with the same consideration one might expect would be shown 
to a grower ordering 5,000 budded plants. I have ordered roses from 
both eastern and western Canadian growers, but it has not been my 
experience to receive plants in such fine condition as those which 
arrived from Harkness. As alike as peas in a pod, they were budded 
short on Canina stock and each had a really clean fine root system. 
The plants themselves were maidens with two or three pencil-like 
shoots neatly pruned to ten inches. The buds swelled and sent out 
foliage that left no doubt that this was something different in roses. 
The leaves and stems have a fragrance all of their own. The Moss rose 
belongs to the group that does not bloom on new wood, and while the 



114 



plants grew sturdily no flowers appeared that first summer. I had 
decided that if survival was to be tested no pampering would be 
allowed and except for a scattering of sharp sand around the base no 
protection was given. The tips of some of the plants appearing 
through the varying snow drifts during the first winter gave rise to 
several second thoughts, but the die was cast. 

When spring rolled out the green carpet, the situation looked 
rather bleak. The base area of the plants seemed green and alive, but 
the tops which were necessary to produce the bloom looked very stiff 
and dry. My fears were groundless for right to the tip of each shoot 
the buds turned red and the bushes grew as though refreshed from 
the long rest. And then came the flowers. Each flower-bud kitten-soft 
in its light green mossy coat uncurling into a many petaled bloom of 
the clearest pink. Roses without fragrance are like pearls without 
lustre. Experts may hold scholarly debate over the exact properties of 
rose perfume but the Moss rose is not one that you must delve deeply 
among the petals with your nose to catch an elusive scent. When the 
branches are arched over with hundreds of flowers a blindfold would 
not keep you in doubt that you were walking among roses. 

Patience is an asset to the gardener and the judgement of the 
hardiness of the Moss Rose included an exercise of patience. Now 
after five trying winters I can state that the survival rate for my Moss 
roses has been one hundred percent. With an absolute minimum pro- 
tection of sharp sand around the base the bushes have flourished and 
have bloomed with joyful abundance. I don't know if it is an adapta- 
tion to our local conditions but the Moss roses avoid the fault of being 
eager beavers. It takes more than a couple of warm days and a spring 
rain to make the Moss roses break into growth. Last spring while the 
super hardy Therese Bugnet was taking severe punishment to her 
tender foliage from wind and frost, the Moss roses held tight and 
waited until the weather settled down before breaking into growth. 
I make no attempts to push any of my plants and find that the late 
sleepers do very well. 

No rose without a thorn. I have outlined the advantages of the 
Moss Roses and I could add that they are almost pest-free and seldom 
visited by the curculio. The only real thorn I have found is that the 
Canina stock on which they are budded keeps wanting to get into 
the act and it is necessary to remove the suckering shoots. This is often 
a tiresome and fiddling task and means some careful digging to get the 

115 



sucker off clean at the root. The second thorn exists only in the minds 
of those who require their roses to be everbloorning. How disappointed 
they must be ; since none of the roses I have grown actually fill the bill. 
Hybrid teas, floribundas and the like bloom in spasms and, while 
generally one can find some blooms to enjoy from a group, the indi- 
vidual bushes have their rest periods. The Moss roses have a blooming 
period of from five to six weeks. Starting here about the middle of 
June and keeping a steady production of bloom until the end of July. 
The fact that flower production is stopped in favor of producing new 
growth which has time to ripen is probably a large factor in their 
survival abilities. Six weeks of beauty and SURVIVAL is a great 
reward for the little care it takes. 

And now that the experiment has proved successful I am think- 
ing of Moss roses in the different colours and wondering how the 
Bourbons would do. 



There is a rose for every taste. Whether we are newly awakened to 
flowers and delight in the dazzling display of Floribundas, or the most 
exquisite blooms of the classy Hybrid Tea; or whether our senses have 
developed still further and embrace the perfect rose of a more refined 
and delicate age; there is, I repeat, a rose for every taste. 

GRAHAM STUART THOMAS 



116 




i 



'GOLDGLEAM' (flonbunda) 
'Gleaming X 'Allgold' 
Raised by E. B. Le Grice 

TRIAL GROUND CERTIFICATE 1965 



District Reports 



VANCOUVER ISLAND — Fred Blakeney 

To start this report I must refer back to my report of last year, in which 
I mentioned the cold snap that descended on us in December, 1964. 
Well, its effects were felt rather widely this summer in that there was 
quite a lot of dieback due to partial frosting of the stems. However, 
the weather here has been very good for roses, and they soon sent out 
new wood. The highlight of the year as far as roses are concerned is the 
Annual Flower Show of the Victoria Horticultural Society. There are 
over 600 members in this Society, and the Summer Show is practically 
a rose show supplemented by other flowers, fruits and vegetables. In 
the Rose Division there are 40 classes which are well filled with entries 
and competition is keen. The standard of roses is high, It is interesting 
to note that there are no money prizes in the rose division. Ribbons are 
awarded to the first, second and third place winners, and ten trophies 
add zest to the competitive spirit which exists in no small degree. 

There is one feature about horticultural society shows that I think 
should be considered by rose societies too, and that is the fact that the 
shows are put on for the general public to attend. In general the public 
are interested in other flowers as well as roses, and, such being the case, 
something of interest to the public should be on show as well as roses. 
I do not mean that there should be classes for other flowers, but, if at 
all possible, space around the wall could be rented to commercial 
people such as florists, nurserymen of all types, garden supply houses, 
and specialists in African violets, cacti, succulents, etc. Even pre- 
fabricated greenhouses and cold frames could be on display. All of these 
would be of added interest to the public visiting the rose show, and 
the rent collected would go a long way to paying the rent for the hall 
in which the show is held. I offer this suggestion because the public 
attending the Victoria Horticultural Show were greatly interested in 
these side shows and placed many orders for the various items on 
display, so much so that commercial men booked space for the follow- 
ing show. In no way did these side shows detract the attention of the 
public from the roses. In practically every case the roses received the 



117 



attention of the public first and then they went around the side shows 
as a fill-in. I might also add that a Fall Show is held when outdoor 
chrysanthemums and dahlias are the dominating flowers. Commercial 
side shows are staged in this show just as in the Summer Show when 
roses hold the spotlight. 

Now to change the subject. The City Council has spent over 
$1,000,000 on a city block in which the old City Hall is situated. The 
City Hall, which is of the Queen Victoria era, has been completely 
modernized and new wings added. All the old buildings in the block 
have been demolished and others, such as a theatre, have been dressed 
up. The grounds have been laid out in a very pleasing style with a 
spectacular fountain in the centre. The whole project was designed 
to mark Canada's Centennial and is named Centennial Square. 

To crown and beautify the whole project a bed of Miss Canada 
roses has been planted consisting of 1 25 plants. They were a gift to the 
city from the Victoria Horticultural Society. The Mayor, Mr. A. W. 
Toone, officially received the gift from Mrs, Ena McCabe, President 
of the Society, and Major G. A. Wiggan, Secretary-Treasurer. I had 
the honour of presenting a bouquet of Miss Canada roses to Mrs. 
Toone. The Miss Canada roses are giving a very good account of 
themselves, thanks to the excellent attention given them under the 
direction of Mr. H. W. Warren, Parks Administrator, in their rightful 
setting in the place of honour in Victoria's Centennial Square. 



VANCOUVER — (Mrs.) Phyllis Walkinshaw 

1966 — B.C. Centennial Year, a year of celebration and a successful 
and eventful one for the Vancouver Rose Society, whose emblem is 
"The Rose". Vancouver is truly a City of Roses, in every garden, large 
or small, roses bloomed in spite of the weatherman's unpredictable and 
unseasonable weather from April to the middle of July. These were 
hazardous months for rose-lovers and unless a rigid spraying routine 
was followed, Blackspot, Mildew and Pests prevailed. Members that 
had diseases and pests under control report they sprayed systematically 
with a combination of an insecticide and fungicide of either Ortho 
products of Later's products; others with Gardol, Cygon, Phalatan, etc. 

Meetings: Owing to demolition of our old meeting place at the 
Y.W.C.A., we moved in April to the Hall of St. John's (Shaughnessy) 



118 



Church, Granville Street at 27th Avenue West. Our Monthly Meet- 
ing night was changed from the third Tuesday to the third Monday. 

Our Programmes followed timely topics, keyed to assist new 
members. We had two Parlour Shows — May 1 6th and September 
1 9th. We travelled via colored slides to England, New Zealand and to 
local gardens. An illustrated lecture on "Birds in our Gardens" was 
fascinating and spell-binding. However, the largest meeting in the 
history of our Society — our Red Letter Meeting — was on June 14th 
when 142 members of the New Zealand Rose Society, who were 
returning from the American Rose Society Convention at Portland, 
attended and took over our meeting. We listened with interest to the 
well-organized program by their various members. We saw from 
colored slides the beauties of New Zealand and other scenes of interest. 
We were astounded at the luxuriant growth; the height of their rose 
bushes and the size and quality of their blooms. A Meeting we will 
long remember. 

Special Events: The Annual Pruning Demonstration, in Stanley 
Park Rose Garden, was held two> days in March. Experienced pruners 
from our Society drew crowds around the allotted Rose Beds and added 
to our Membership. 

"Vancouver, City of Roses" was the theme of our 17th Annual 
Rose Show, June 20th and 21st. The Show was offiicially opened by 
Vancouver Park Commissioner, Mrs. Grace McCarthy. It was a Rose 
Show of outstanding merit — a credit to Rose Show Chairman Alex 
McGregor, Co-chairman Stan McDonald, their committee and to 
every exhibitor. The competition was keen, the roses never more beau- 
tiful and the colors more vivid. 490 entries in the Open Classes and 
90 Flower Arrangements displayed in niches. It is not practical, at this 
time, to relate the names of all the winners, however, I must mention 
1 2-year-old Luke Stockdale. Luke grows and attends to his own roses, 
can name them all. At our Rose Show his "Gail Borden" was judged 
The Best Rose in the Show. 

Best White — "Frau Karl Drusehki" 

Best Yellow — "Gold Crown" 

Best Red — "Americana" 

Best Novice — "Tropicana" 

Best Children — "Gail Borden" 

Best Floribunda — "Orangeade" 

Best Grandiflora — "Pink Parfait" 



119 



Most Meritorious Exhibit — "A Basket of Old Fashioned Roses". 

One of the most looked forward to events in our Rose Season is 
our Annual Garden Party. Mabel and Preston Sharpe were our con- 
genial hosts at their beautifully kept Rose Gardens. Watch for the 
Sharpes in their Rose Garden (in Canada) on TV over GBG during 
Expo Programmes on Telescope. 

A feature of the 1 966 Pacific National Exhibition Horticultural 
Show was the "Miss Canada Rose Display" sponsored by our Society 
and contributed to by Eddies Nurseries. "Miss Canada" proved to be 
not only a fragrant Show Rose but one of lasting qualities. "Miss 
Canada" is a MUST for all our gardens. 

Honors: Our member, Bill Purvis, won the coveted award of 
"The Best Rose" and also "The Best Red Rose" at the C.R.S. Rose 
Show at Brampton, Ontario, with "Ena Harkness". 

At the American Rose Society Annual National and Inter- 
national Rose Show, Portland, Oregon, our Archie Selwood won the 
International Sweepstake with "First Love" and the Canada Sweep- 
stakes with "Mrs. Sam McGredy". 

A Life Membership was presented to Harold Faulkner, one of 
the original members of our Society, a Past President and a Rose 
enthusiast from his boyhood days in England. 

A happy ending to a successful Rose Year was our Annual Ban- 
quet on December 6th and the birth of a daughter, "Loraine", to our 
President and Mrs. Alex McGregor on December 2nd, 1966. A sister 
for Craig and the Vancouver Rose Society's first baby born to a Pre- 
sident and his wife, "Baby Loraine". 

CALGARY — Mrs. P. H.Bastin and Miss Helen Scan, Calgary Rose 

Society 

One can never tell at the beginning of a season what the results will 
be ! A very warm spell in early spring was followed by a sharp, severe 
cold spell resulting in a heavy loss of previous year bushes. The weather 
for the remainder of the summer (with the exception of a cold June) 
was ideal for rose culture, and many outstanding blooms, though of 
the second blooming, were entered in the rose section of the Calgary 
Horticultural Show late in August. As we have no opportunity to dis- 
play the first flowering which occurs in early July in this area, it has 
been planned to have an exhibition of roses next July. 



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The Rose Trial Garden, begun in June, 1964, has been extended 
by the addition of thirty Miss Canada roses. A tea to which the public 
was invited was held at the garden in late July and the roses were a 
riot of bloom. New members have joined our Society as a result of 
their interest in seeing how successfully roses can be grown in Calgary. 

The club was saddened this year by the death of a former Direc- 
tor, Charles Crowhurst, a fine gardener and a devoted rose grower. 

A Calgary artist will be submitting a painting to be hung at 
Expo '67. Mrs. Janet Mitchell has been commissioned by the Readers' 
Digest on behalf of the Rotary Clubs in the Toronto^Montreal areas to 
do a painting of the John F. Kennedy Rose. At first it was thought the 
painting could be done from photographs and blooms sent to Calgary 
from the U.S.A. However, due to plant import restrictions, it was 
necessary to find a rose growing in this locality. After a thorough 
search, how proud we were when Miss Marguerite Jacques, one of 
our members, was found to have the only John F. Kennedy bush in 
the vicinity. Miss Jacques "watched that bush like a mother hen" and 
was well rewarded when it provided plenty of roses to work from. 

For our centennial project the Society plans to provide a bed 
of not less than sixty Miss Canada roses in the new Confederation 
Park now being developed. But how to raise sufficient funds to pay for 
this project? An opportunity presented itself at the time to participate 
in a three-day bazaar at one of the major shopping centres. What fun 
and fellowship was had in getting together the Treasures and Trifles — 
the articles of home-baking and sewing and the products of the "green 
thumbs" in the group! Besides raising sufficient funds to launch the 
project, we were also able to make a substantial donation to the Cana- 
dian Mental Health Association. 

For some years now one or two of our members have had rose 
bushes flown in from England, and this past season several others 
experimented with them and the results were quite pleasing. 

Everyone growing Miss Canada roses was impressed by their 
sturdy growth, their resistance to disease, and their profuse blooming 
quality. 

Because of the unusually long frost-free fall season, the gardens 
showed magnificent rose blooms as late as mid-October. 

To all rose enthusiasts, may we send our best wishes for a most 
wonderful growing season in our Centennial year. 

121 



LETHBRIDGE — /. K. Wood 

Old Man Winter was very rude to our Queen of Flowers during the 
1965-66 winter, with the result that many rose growers are perplexed 
and very disappointed with their efforts. Despite the usual methods of 
protection against frost, many experienced growers had losses close to 
100 per cent. The winter did not seem particularly severe or pro- 
tracted, but it is now considered that the damage must have been done 
when there was very little snow cover. Growers of chrysanthemums 
were also affected adversely. 

There were some notable exceptions to the general rule, and 
it was evident that plants in well-sheltered locations did not suffer so 
severely. Another observation is that some of the successful growers 
used leaves and straw instead of earth for the winter cover. 

The surviving plants had the benefit of good spring rains and 
have bloomed abundantly but, owing to the heavy mortality, it was 
not possible to carry on the weekly displays in the Paramount Theatre, 
and the number of rose entries in our annual Horticultural Show was 
restricted. 

Fortunately, there is always "next year" and it is expected that 
Miss Canada and other blooms will make their contribution in adding 
distinction to our Centennial Year. 

Plans are now being made for rose and iris gardens to be located 
close to our Nikka Yuko Centennial Garden, which is already a unique 
tourist attraction. 

SASKATCHEWAN — Mrs. /. Zary, Saskatoon, Sask. 

Without a doubt 1966 has been a great year for tender roses in the 
Province of Saskatchewan. This was, in my opinion, partly due to the 
abundance of rain in the spring and the fact that cool weather delayed 
blooming by at least two weeks. 

Due to the severe winter and cold, cold spring, many of the roses 
spring-killed to just below ground level. Instead of digging them up 
and throwing them away, as I usually do, I removed the top inch of 
soil and left them. They began making new growth about the middle 
of June — in fact the last one made its initial growth in the first week 
of July. They haven't stopped growing since. 

This adds strength to the theory that tender roses should be 
planted deeply — the union at least 4" below ground level. Since I 

122 



never cover any roses deep planting is the only thing that saved them 
this year, I believe. 

Unless you are prepared to treat tea roses as an annual — that 
is sustain from 10% to 90% loss each year from winter or spring 
killing, it is recommended that tender roses be covered in any of the 
approved methods that have been fully described. 

I find that in my garden (the soil is a good loam 18" deep with 
lots of humus) only a minimum of fertilizing is required. I fertilize 
only once each year — usually early in June, using 1 1-48-0 or 16-20-0 
— about a cupful for each plant worked well into the ground all 
around the plant. Old manure and peat moss is liberally added to the 
rose garden each year. I plant my roses about 1 8" apart — but if I 
had the room I would allow two feet each way for each rose bush. 

A dusting of Rose Dust every ten days appears to control all 
diseases. Insecticides — ( Malathion for aphids and Aramite for red 
spider) are used only if insects put in their appearance. 

The rose garden is kept weed-free and it is important to remove 
all dead flowers. When roses are cut for floral work, I never remove a 
longer stem than necessary. The stem should be cut about *4" above 
a five-part leaf. This seems to encourage rapid new growth for sub- 
sequent blooms. 

The following roses are recommended on the basis of their beauty, 
cutting value, quantity and quality of bloom and the success and ease 
of their culture in my garden and those of my friends : 

I will first list the floribundas: "Fire King", fiery red, single and 
the most outstanding color I've ever grown or seen. Non-fading. "Sea 
Foam", a terrific white, slightly pink before wide open, very double 
and has bloomed steady for three months. Excellent for cutting. 
"Fashion", performs wonderfully, a beautiful salmon coral, cuts well. 
"Ivory Fashion", has all the good qualities of its parent "Fashion", a 
near white with a brief fragrance, a good rose. "Little Darling", a 
blend of red, orange and pink, is an excellent and thrifty grower. 
"Circus", red and yellow, is worth growing. "Moulin Rouge", which 
is seldom listed, is one of the best for cutting and truly rivals "Gar- 
nette", grown for the florist trade. "Golden Slippers", did not perform 
well for me but in gardens where there was more clay, it seemed hap- 
pier. "Pink Bountiful" is sweet but not very vigorous for me. "Jiminy 
Cricket", a good bet, is a rich coral pink. "Pinocchio" and "Red 
Pinocchio" did well and are delightful. A small floribunda. 



123 



In the Grandifloras "Queen Elizabeth" is still a great favourite. 
This is a truly lovely pink. "Pink Parfait" — ice cream sundae colors 
of rose pink to coral. This one is a charmer for the ladies. "John S. 
Aimstrong" — a dark red, performed well. "Carrousel" is one of the 
darkest reds I've ever seen in roses. It is very double and truly a won- 
derful bloomer. "Masquerade" is listed in the Floribundas but I think 
rates among the Grandifloras. This one opens yellow, turns coral pink 
and finally red. A charmer. 

In the Hybrid Tea Roses the following have certainly scored 
high: "Charlotte Armstrong" — dark pink, a tall grower, 50 to 60 
petals, always vigorous. "Chicago Peace", a good large pink with 
yellow base. Has all the wonderful characters of its parent "Peace", a 
yellow and pink. "Christian Dior" — lush crimson, 50 to 60 petals, a 
very superior rose which lives up to its very famous name — a formal 
first. "Confidence" is a little pale (pink) when grown among strong 
colors, but has beautiful buds. "Crimson Glory" — red, a little weak 
in the head, some fragrance. "Chrysler Imperial" — a scarlet, a very 
superior rose in every way. "Mme Henri Guillot" when obtainable is a 
treat indeed, its color rivaling "Fire King". "New Yorker" — bright 
red, a good grower in cool, moist weather. Tiffany" — pink, some yel- 
low at base, blooms very freely, long lasting with some fragrance. 
"White Knight" is #1 choice in white roses for long lasting cut flowers, 
purity of color and a free bloomer. Large flowers, 50 to 60 petals. This 
list would be very amiss without the following teas: "El Capitan", 
clear red, good for cutting, beautiful in bud and open. Five recent 
additions which are tremendous — "Tropicana", orange-red, gor- 
geous. "Hawaii" — orange on orange, very exciting, warm color. Both 
perform well here. "Forty-niner" — a by-color, red and yellow, does not 
do well in hot weather. "Condesa de Sastago" — same color range and 
a little more reliable than "Forty-niner". "Golden Masterpiece" is a 
splendid yellow, even outdoes "King's Ransom" in color. Both are 
vigorous but "King's Ransom" has a larger flower. "Kordes Perfecta" 
is a ladies' rose, pink and white, fragrant. "Memoriam", almost a 
perfect pink, 50 to 60 petals, long pointed buds with a high centre. 
"Sutter's Gold" — yellow, good in bud only, some fragrance. 

"Miss Canada" and "Centennial" I have not grown but reports 
are favourable. Hope to have more on these next year. 

Two roses I would like to mention before closing are dwarf Poly- 



124 



anthas. "Gabriel Privat", a bright double pink. "Orange Triumph", 
double orange. Good growers and bloom profusely. 

MANITOBA — Mrs. W. A. MacBondd, Winnipeg 

Here in Manitoba we started 1966 in our usual fashion, as far as 
weather was concerned. We're record-setters! The coldest January 
since 1875, with temperatures down to — 42.9 degrees in Winnipeg, 
and — 60 below in Brochet, north of our city; the coldest mid- 
February since 1879 ( — 49 below) ; a blizzard in early March, with 
14" of snow in one day. Another 9" snowfall in April prompted an 
S.O.S. in the "Winnipeg Tribune" — Manitoba's birds are in danger 
of starving" — and we all rallied around to put out extra feed on top 
of the snow. Going to the other extreme, we were the hottest city in 
Canada at the end of June — 93.8 degrees, with humidity 69%. Then 
there was the Spring flood. Many gardens were flooded, others were 
buried by the bulldozers throwing up extra dykes at newly-threatened 
points. 

However, the spirit of the horticultural community being what 
it is, we all rolled up our sleeves and went to work with vigour and 
enthusiasm. In most areas roses were left covered until mid-May, at 
least, but we had frosts during the first half of June. Nevertheless, the 
plants seemed to be in good condition when they were finally un- 
covered and, in spite of the severe winter, the percentage of loss was 
normal. Warmer weather later in June brought the roses along rapidly. 

Reports indicate that we have had a wonderful season. Produc- 
tion has been very satisfying, and disease does not appear to have been 
too much of a problem. Pests are always with us to a greater or lesser 
degree; but the remedy is in our hands — we maintain a regular 
spraying and/ or dusting programme. 

Mr. Pfeiffer, of Winnipeg, reports that he used a different type 
of winter protection for 1 965-66 : Fine (builders' ) sand was mounded 
to a height of about 1 2" around the roses. A layer of dry leaves could 
have been added for extra protection, but a good fall of snow promptly 
added the finishing touch. Results were encouraging, in spite of the 
severe winter; there was above-average survival. He notes that, 
although there were mice in the rose-beds, there had been no chewing 
below sand level. Sand has been used again this Fall. 

This year a large number of new varieties have been brought in 
from Europe and from Eastern Canada for the Park gardens; local 



125 



growers will be able to study the development of the plants and to de- 
cide on those which seem most suitable for their own gardens. Mr. 
Pfeiffer comments particularly on 'Fragrant Cloud' (or 'Duftwolke' in 
Europe) ; it is a beautiful rose, long-lasting, and has an outstanding 
fragrance. 'Vienna Charm' does not like our hot Prairie sun. He 
mentions several other good varieties, but space does not permit listing 
them. 

Mr. Harvey Sparling, Portage la Prairie, says that the past sum- 
mer was the best in many years for roses in his area. Although there 
was a most severe winter, losses were light; he himself had none. Inci- 
dentally, his winter protection consists of sawdust and butter boxes; 
and, of course, he gives his plants a thorough soaking before freeze-up. 
The show of bloom was exceptionally good from the latter part of 
June until about the end of July, when there was a period of five weeks 
without rain. When the rains finally came, the roses went into pro- 
duction again, providing luxuriant bloom until almost the end of 
October. 

Mr. Grindle, Flin Flon, says that in his area the winter was 
milder than usual, but snow cover was less. They had an average 
Spring, and there were few casualties. There was an ample rainfall 
during the summer, and the roses bloomed almost continuously from 
the beginning of July until the end of the season. He, too, tfiinks that 
this was one of the best years for roses. 

The Flin Flon Horticultural Society held its Fourth Annual Rose 
Show in late July. The blooms were of good quality, and it is encourag- 
ing to note that there were many new exhibitors. Through F.F.H.S., 
members had purchased a good number of 'Miss Canada' roses ; and 
the Society also planted some at the Home for Senior Citizens. A 
small Centennial Park is being made in the town, and visitors will prob- 
ably find roses blooming there in 1 967. 

We hear from Mr. Grindle that he visited Horticultural Shows at 
The Pas and at Dauphin, both north of Winnipeg. At each show there 
was a very good display of roses, and at Dauphin, particularly, he 
noted many of the newer varieties on show. 

Dr. Mallow, Kamsack, writes that, on account of his health, he 
has not been able to tend his roses for the past year. They have not been 
fed, watered or sprayed. As he always pampered his plants to the ut- 
most, they naturally would react more quickly and violently to neglect 
than would roses which had been "brought up the hard way". He says 



126 



that most of them are finished, but he adds a remark that is very 
important to Prairie rosarians: "The only plants remaining are those 
on R. canina stock." Thank you, Dr. Mallow, and we hope that you 
will join us again next year. 

In Winnipeg's Red River Exhibition Flower Show in June, we 
started with a very modest number of rose exhibits ; but, by the open- 
ing of the third show of the week, the weather had improved and the 
number of entries had tripled. At the International Flower Show in 
August we had the largest rose section in the Show's history ( 1 1 years ) . 
Exhibits were of good quality, and competition was very keen. This is 
truly an International Show, open to all comers; however, this year 
our Bronze Medal was won by one of our own C.R.S. members. 

We would like to mention here a note which was sent to us by Mr. 
Cross, of Clearing House fame. He was passing through Winnipeg in 
August and he says of our International: "Was vastly impressed — 
the best Flower Show I've seen in years. Some very good roses, too." 
Naturally, we were very happy to hear that. 

We held our Annual Outdoor Rose Show in July, and this was 
well-attended. The entries were numerous and of good quality; and 
they were judged by Mr. S. Westaway, of the U. of M. Plant Science 
Department, who is well-known for his TV talks on horticulture. 
Later, he gave us some helpful advice on exhibiting. 

We thank Messrs. Grindle, PfeifTer, Sparling and Dr. Mallow for 
their assistance with this report. We unite in sending to all members 
our good wishes for the coming year. Let us make 1967 the Year of 
Roses. We hope that 'Miss Canada' will be flourishing in every garden 
to mark the celebration of Canada's Centennial Year. 



LAKEHEAD AREA — //. C. Westbrook 

The year 1966 will, I believe, be known as the Year of the Feast of 
Roses. 

After a winter of very heavy snow, spring broke late and growth 
remained at a standstill. Then in June the weather became a rosarian's 
delight and lasted all summer. The bushes developed so fast that sev- 
eral growers had the first round nearly completed at the time of the 
Rose Show in mid- July. Chicago Peace was once again the Rose of 
the Show. 



127 



Throughout the summer and fall there was a continuous display 
of bloom. The first frost to hit the blooms was on October 1 2, and it 
did not seem to do too much damage as far as it concerned roses. It 
was difficult to single out any blooms as being greatly improved over 
an average year. However, the lack of many heavy rains did give Eiffel 
Tower, Royal Highness and Karl Herbst plenty of scope to impress. 
Sabine, Silver Lining, Tropicana and Gruss and Berlin basked in the 
warmth to the delight of everyone. 

The Feast continued throughout the summer and autumn. It is a 
rare year in this area when one could pick dozens of blooms in early 
October, and this was fairly commonplace during 1966. 

Insects naturally tried to crash the party. The early nuisance was 
caterpillars — including some of the dread forest tent caterpillars. For- 
tunately frosts in the early part of May had killed most of these and so 
the feared invasion did not materialize. Later a few aphids were seen 
but were easily ejected. Rust and blackspot were not much in evidence ; 
but mildew was and it was difficult to control. In twenty years of rose 
growing this was only the third time this writer had seen it. Negligible 
the first two times, it was vicious the tfiird. 

This report was left sitting until an idea occurred for the closing 
paragraphs. The idea came October 15 in the form of a blinding semi- 
blizzard. What a mess the bushes were when the storm moved on — 
crushed, frozen and heavily shrouded in white. To say the least the 
writer was caught with his roses up. Pruning and winter covering had 
seemed weeks away. However, now the pinning has to be done and 
then the earth will have to be heaped on — when the snow is gone. 
Surely this can not be the beginning of the real winter. If it is only a 
warning, the bushes will likely pull, through as well as ever. They 
had better. 

WINDSOR & DISTRICT — G. H. Magee 

The 1966 rose season will be remembered by all Windsor district 
rosarians for our record late frost and for the cold late spring. The 
winter of 1 965-66 was late in arriving and was cold enough to freeze 
hybrid teas fairly well back to the protective hilling. Some pruned high 
but the wood was damaged enough to prevent good growth. The 
bushes were advancing well when around May 10th we had several 
nights with record low temperatures and a low one morning of 26°. 



128 



The soil at Leamington was frozen two inches down. A day or so later 
the roses were a sad sight with the terminal of each shoot destroyed. 
Not all gardens received the frost. In both Windsor and Detroit some 
downtown gardens were hit and others escaped. 

Many rose shows were postponed because of the late season. The 
Greater Windsor Horticultural Society show was held as scheduled on 
June 1 1th and 12th. We were glad to welcome Mr. R. G. Whitlock 
and Mr. J. Burston of London as judges. The show was very small 
but a few of our city exhibitors had their innings (usually their best 
bloom is over by show time) . Piccadilly was best bloom in show. The 
next weekend was a better date for rose shows and the Windsor Ambas- 
sador Horticultural Society show had quite a few rose entries. The new 
Metropolitan Detroit Rose Society held its first show also on this date. 
Much money was spent to achieve a superb first effort. Their mem- 
bers responded with numerous entries and Chrysler Imperial was 
queen of the show. 

My own hybrid teas were not in bloom this weekend so the Cana- 
dian Rose Societies' show had to be out for me. After a week of scorch- 
ing hot weather the Detroit Rose Society held its show, two weeks post- 
poned. This was held at the Livonia Mall and seen by thousands. The 
Suburban gardeners had things their way at this show and the late 
date favoured myself and Fred Rogalski. Queen of the show was Papa 
Meilland and the King was Karl Herbst. 

July here was hot and dry and a very good rose bloom gradually 
withered in the heat. Growth was not too good until in August cooler 
weather and welcome rains rewarded the grower with a lush second 
bloom. 

September shows in Windsor showed good quality bloom but 
not very numerous entries. The Detroit Rose Society's fall show was 
at the Universal City Mall and again had a large number of entries 
with Chicago Peace Queen of the Show and Swarthmore the King. 

In June both Windsor Horticultural Societies held garden 
tours and during the summer both Detroit Rose Societies did likewise. 
I enjoyed these tours and noted in particular the absence of disease 
in the bushes. It was pleasant on the tours to chat with fellow rose 
enthusiasts and enjoy refreshments in a shady corner. 

My report last year was written too early to record the passing 
away of our very esteemed District Director Emerson Mitchell. This 
spring by co-operation of the Greater Windsor Horticultural Society 



129 



and the Parks Department a memorial garden was planted in the 
form of a Centennial Emblem at the Huron Lodge, not far from 
the entrance to the Ambassador Bridge. About 200 of Emerson's 
bushes formed a nucleus for the planting and the Horticultural 
Society ordered 100 new floribundas from Europe for late fall 
planting. The memorial garden will hold about 750 bushes when 
completed. 

Windsor's Jackson Park has had beautiful night lighting added 
and expert attention had made it quite a show garden. Next spring 
the Compass Rose Garden will have several thousand rose bushes 
in bloom to greet tourists. This spring about 1000 roses were 
planted and about 1600 were ordered from Kordes in Germany for 
fall planting, to give a good representation of European varieties. 

Remember next spring the American Rose Societies' National 
Convention will be held in Detroit on June 15th and 16th with the 
show at the J. L. Hudson Co. auditorium. Be sure to come down 
and tour Windsor's rose gardens when you visit this area. 

LONDON — R. G. Whitlock 

The focal point of our year's activities is the Annual Rose Show held 
at the Wellington Square Mall during the latter part of June. How- 
ever, this is only a part. Five meetings are held during the year — 
September, November, January, March and May. These meetings 
are intended to inform, instruct and entertain as many of our members 
as possible. This past year, most interesting talks were given by Mr. 
Wiebicke of Modern Rose Nurseries and Mr. Chapman of Chipman 
Chemicals. Another interesting demonstration on arranging flowers 
was given by a local florist. 

In addition, our Society is a great supporter of the Western 
Fair Association and again many of our members were among the 
top prize winners at the Western Fair, the first part of September. 

Weatherwise, we were treated a little less severely this year and 
no killing frost has been experienced up to the time of writing, October 
31, 1966. 

The following is a report of the Annual Show as given by the 
Show Chairman, Al Whitfield. 

"The London Rose Societies Annual Show was arranged to be 
held at the Wellington Square Mall on June 21 and 22, the same 

130 



dates as held in 1965. All in Southern Ontario remember the cold 
and drawn out spring and on the 14th of June, we had to make 
hurried decision regarding the date of the show. Only a few shrub 
roses were in bloom, although the low growing bushes were laden 
with buds. 

We were able to postpone the show one week through the kind 
co-operation of the Mall. 

The show, however, exceeded our greatest expectations and 
some 40 members staged 363 entries and some 500 rose blooms. Our 
C.R.S. representative, R. G. Whitlock, walked away with five major 
awards and came first in nine of the classes open to him. He cap- 
tured the Queen of the Show with an exquisite specimen of Silver 
Lining. Some of his first prize blooms were Crimson Glory, Karl 
Herbst, Paris Match, Summer Sunshine, Peace, Gordon Eddie, 
Margaret, Michelle Meillande and Sea Pearl. Stan Jenkins made a 
repeat win of the White Rose Trophy with an outstanding bloom of 
Jack Frost while Bob Peirce with a fresh bloom of Super Star won 
the Flitton Trophy. Bill Connolly displayed mastery in the floribunda 
class with a repeat on a fine spray of Red Favourite. The novice 
class was replaced this year with a class for growers with fifty or less 
bushes. This proved a great incentive to those with smaller gardens. 
The Arrangement Class was much improved with many more entries 
and was better displayed on larger tables. We are expecting an even 
better year ahead, if the interest shown by the public is any indication. 
Four hundred books on growing roses, published by a well known 
writer were soon distributed to interested people. This was a gift of 
the Red Rose Tea people." 

PETERBOROUGH — Margaret Heideman 

The variety of problems which can beset the rose fancier is almost 
laughable; however disappointed one is, one might just as well laugh, 
for one cannot change the weather — not yet, anyway. Last year's 
reports regretted a winter that was so cruel to roses; this year's 
reports will not record a difficult winter, but will record a missing 
spring, for we leapt directly into summer, hot, hot summer. 

Oddly enough, in spite of more than the usual quota of such 
griefs, rosarians managed to have some good moments in southern 
Ontario. The garden reception and buffet supper held by Sheridan 



131 



Nurseries to honour Mr. Sam McGredy was one such delightful 
moment : pleasant company and excellent food in a beautiful garden 
setting on a perfect summer day. Who could ask for more, except 
perhaps for more roses to show in Brampton and Peterborough! 

But Cobourg had them all a week later. Fittingly enough, a 
McGredy's Yellow was the Best Rose in Show at Peterborough, ex- 
hibited by Mrs. George Kennedy of Cobourg who also exhibited the 
Best White Rose — Burnaby — and the Best Red — Karl Herbst. 
Mr. George Brinning of Cobourg was also a top winner in the Peter- 
borough Show, as he received the Hancock Trophy, a silver rose 
bowl, for the most points in show. Mr. Robert Prior, president of 
the Peterborough Horticultural Society, won the novice award, a 
medal of the Canadian Rose Society was an exhibitor who had never 
before won a major award. 

The weather provided a dramatic backdrop for the Cobourg 
Show held at the Citizen's Centre. Just as the judging got under 
way, a mighty storm blew out of the north, bringing down trees and 
extmguishing lights. Judging had to proceed by livid storm light and 
flash light. Cobourg had a large display of truly magnificent roses, 
blooms worthy of Sam McGredy's own display gardens near Belfast 
and of the favorable Irish climate. Unfortunately their beauty could 
be discerned only dimly by the many people who braved the storm 
to see the results of the judging, for the lights were not restored in 
time. 

The Best Rose in the Cobourg Show was "Red Peace" exhibited 
by Mr. Arthur Jones. Mr. Brinning again won the trophy for the 
most points in show. Mrs. Douglas Gibson won the red rose trophy 
and Mr. Ed Patton the award for the best white rose. A large 
number of the 120 entries in this show was made by novice growers 
who have been greatly encouraged by Mr. Brinning's enthusiasm. 

A summer visit to the West Coast was both encouraging and 
discouraging. After having watched the late June and early July roses 
cook in the hot Ontario sun, the writer enjoyed the masses of August 
roses in Vancouver, Nanaimo and Victoria, and was reminded of a 
Christmas Day years ago when late roses were picked in a Port 
Alberni garden. 

Last year's search for the pink polyantha "Mile Cecile 
Brunner" likewise brought mixed disappointment and pleasure. Old- 
fashioned roses ordered from an excellent small nursery in California 



132 




'EVE ALLEN' (H.T.) 
'Karl Herbst' X 'Gay Crusader 
Raised by Edgar M. Allen. Distributed by John Sanday (Roses) Ltd 

TRIAL GROUND CERTIFICATE I964 



VARIETY CLUB' (floribunda) 
'Columbine' X 'Circus' 
Raised by S. McGredy IV, N. Ireland 

TRIAL GROUND CERTIFICATE 1965 



arrived in such a mouldy mess that it is a wonder any survived six 
weeks en route in the heat, but, miraculously, half a dozen plants not 
only survived, but bloomed as well, so tough is the rose. The dates 
stamped on the package documented the facts that, for some obscure 
reason, the shipment took three weeks to pass through the bureaucracy 
in its native California, and that, after arriving in Peterborough once, 
it was shipped back to Toronto Customs who had forgotten to stamp 
it. The package had never been opened for inspection — the stamp 
was apparently all that was necessary to make its entry legal. This 
second trip between Toronto and Peterborough, a distance of ninety 
miles, required nearly two weeks. Finally, we were able to exchange 
our import permit obtained months beforehand for the almost dead 
remnants of so much potential beauty! No wonder American 
growers hesitate to encourage Canadian customers ! 

The happy part of this story is that six plants of "Mile Cecile 
Brunner", bought from an American nursery not so far away, arrived 
in excellent condition in good April planting weather and bloomed 
all summer long, giving great pleasure to their grower and to those 
who received bouquets of this exquisite and fragrant little rose. 

OTTAWA — Grace Shewfelt 

The winter of 1965-66 was not so harsh for roses as the previous 
winter when exceptionally deep frosts in the Ottawa district killed 
many bushes despite the winter protection which is necessary in this 
area. However, several of my roses, including one of my favorites, 
Kordes Perfecta, which had been weakened by the severe conditions 
of the preceding winter, did not survive. 

May was a chilly month in Ottawa and rose growth, especially 
on new plants, was slightly retarded. 

In late June and July the intense heat brought the buds to 
maturity quickly. The individual flowers unfurled swiftly and after 
a brief day in the intense sunlight their petals fell off in bright cascades. 

The later August and September blooms were more satisfactory. 
The hybrid tea roses developed fine flowers on long sturdy stems with 
a number of branches growing from the main stem. As a result the 
long stemmed blossoms were excellent for cut flowers. The new 
growth on the climbing roses was correspondingly tall and strong. 

133 



September and October have been mild and there were still 
roses in the garden which I used in the Thanksgiving dinner centre- 
piece. 

There has been some incidence of black spot in Ottawa in the 
last few years. While some plants appear to resist this, others are 
quite vulnerable and lose too many leaves. The showery weather 
conditions of the Ottawa Valley and the resultant overnight damp- 
ness appear to aggravate this. Treatment with fungicides does not 
seem to completely eHminate the blight. 

Fortunately I did not have any mildew on my rose bushes this 
year although this has appeared occasionally in the past, especially 
in damp seasons. 

Miss Canada, the silver and pink centennial rose, has been a 
welcome newcomer to Ottawa rose gardens. The cheerful new flori- 
bunda, Centennial, is very effective as a bedding rose and the display 
inside the gates at the Governor General's residence was a spectacular 
example. 

Isabelle d' Ortiz, which resembles Miss Canada, was also well 
received. Apricot Nectar, a new floribunda, and Beaute, a bronze 
hybrid tea, were unusual and pleasing. 

Dearest, a dainty pink floribunda with shades of apricot, 
imported from Ireland, was especially liked by one of the Ottawa 
rose growers. 

Although everyone likes to try the newer varieties, roses such 
as Peace and Queen Elizabeth are classic favorites. 

My own Peace is fourteen years old and still blooms prolific- 
ally throughout the summer and autumn. When I take a single 
rose to the office there are always surprised exclamations: "It's real !" 
'T didn't know roses grew that big!" 

MONTREAL DISTRICT — W. G. Borland, H. C. Cross, 
E. B. Jubien 

It is a rainy Sunday morning in December as we sit down to write 
our report for this district for 1966. Theo Mayer has already been 
after us to give him this report on at least two occasions but somehow 
it is difficult to find anything new and interesting to say that will be 
of interest to rose growers in other parts of Canada. 

134 



We had a good crop of roses this year in our district pretty 
much on regular time. We find it difficult to forecast even two 
weeks ahead how the blooms will be on a certain week end late in 
June to tie in with the date that has been set for our various shows. 
This year was no exception and some areas had set the time for 
their shows that was either too early or too late to hit the peak of the 
blooming period. Perhaps it would be well to mention here that each 
year there are more Horticultural Societies in this area staging a 
rose show in June ; the Est is now getting to be a lengthy one as will be 
mentioned later. 

Winter kill was at a minimum this year, many growers had 
climbers in full bloom this June and July, which is not a regular 
occurrence for our climate in Southern Quebec. The summer was 
warmer than usual but the roses did well though frequent watering 
was required. For this reason some of the roses in the parks did not 
do so well during the long dry weather in July. On the other hand 
Jack Frost held off for a long time and we didn't get "a killer" until 
October 29 which is more than a month beyond the usual time. 
Consequendy we saw our rose bushes producing some of their finest 
blooms in the fall. Blackspot was not too troublesome in most gardens 
but mildew was evident and frequent spraying or dusting was needed 
to keep it under control. 

In addition to the Rose Shows held at Greenfield Park, St. Lam- 
bert, Town of Mount Royal, Montreal West, Rosemere, West End, 
Baie d'Urfe and Mount Bruno, several of the Lake Shore societies, 
including Dorval, Beaconsfield and Pointe Claire, held a combined 
show which was very successful. Special mention should be made of 
the show at Mount Bruno which was very well planned, well staged 
and the hall very tastefully decorated — their first show by the way. 
The problem of obtaining qualified rose judges for these and other 
shows always presents a problem and we note that the Executive of 
the Canadian Rose Society in Toronto has taken some steps to train 
and certify competent judges in that area, which is a very good move 
that we trust will spread to our district. 

We would like to call attention to the tremendous boost that 
has been given to rose growing in this area by the action of the Lake 
Shore Rotary Club in sponsoring their Centennial Rose, proceeds from 
the sale of which are given to the Retarded Children's Fund. 

In addition to the Rose Gardens already in operation at the 



135 



Montreal Botanical Gardens, Memorial Park and Connaught Park, 
there was a planting of more than 3,000 bushes made in Mount Royal 
Cemetery. This should be of considerable interest to visitors next year 
when they visit Expo. Incidentally, while we do not have any details 
at the moment, we understand that a very extensive rose planting has 
been made on the site of this exhibition. 

So, all in all, in looking back it was a good year for roses and 
rose lovers in this area. We made some progress, and if the many 
enquiries that come to your regional directors here are any indication 
of the interest there is then next year should be even better. We would 
all like to welcome Mrs. Jupp in Toronto who, we have just learned, 
has taken on the job of Chairman for 1967 of the Regional Directors 
Committee. 

QUEBEC CITY — Louis T. Beaulieu 

L'hiver 1965/ 66 nous a favorises d'un tapis de neige plus que con- 
formable, une situation pas trop appreciee par les humains mais tres 
favorable a la protection des rosiers. Le printemps ne s'est pas com- 
porte avec autant de consideration; il a ete long ce qui est normal 
ici. Cependant, la mesure a deborde cette annee, juin etant tres 
desagreable en majeure partie. Les rosiers n'ont pas apprecie ce traite- 
ment cavalier et nous ant boudes. Une exposition de roses a la fin 
de juin serait un desastre ici, faute de combattants. 

Juillet nous a donne un ete splendide, pas long, cependant, tres 
beau et tres chaud. II est malheureux que nos etes soient toujours 
rognees par les deux bouts. Les rosiers se sont sentis enfin a l'aise et 
ont donne tres bien: la premiere floraison a 6te magnifique. Aout 
nous a remis au normal avec une temperature tres variee, assez 
pluvieuse et plutot froide, accompagnee d'une attaque continue et 
tres violente de Black Spot. J'ai rarement vu un assaut de ce genre, 
tout particulierement dans la banlieu. 

Cette situation s'est averee beaucoup plus serieuse pour les Flori- 
bundas et la encore les rosiers rouges ont ete beacoup plus affectes que 
les autres: les Alains ont perdu toutes leur feuilles, les Fashions ont 
ete beaucoup moins touches, un Goldilocks plante avec 10 floribun- 
das rouges n'a pas ete touche. J'ai toujours ete sous 1'impression que 
les couleur foncees resistaient mieux que les autres; cependant, apres 
l'experience de cette annee je crois que tout est possible. II est certaine- 

136 



ment etrange comment cette peste peut s'attaquer ici et la dans le 
meme jardin et sous les memes conditions. Un fait demeure, cepen- 
dant; si Ton excepte le Black Spot qui revient regulierement toujours 
plus fort en banlieu qu'en ville, les autres pestes ne sont jamais un 
probleme ici. 

Nous ne pouvons pas compter que sur une belle floraison 
d'ensemble, c'est a dire un beau deploiement; ensuite c'est comme-ci 
comme-ga. Cette annee la temperature tres froide de Septmbre a mis 
fin tres rapidement a la saison. 

Comme toujours le grand champion est le Queen Elizabeth. 
Reellement ce rosier est fameux dans notre region. lis donnent tou- 
jours tres bien sur les plantes tres robustes qui semblent immunises 
contre tout. Les Peaces viennent ensuite; cependant ils sont un peu 
plus touches par les fantaisies de la nature. S'il y a quelque chose de 
fantaisiste et d'imprevisible c'est bien le comportement de Dame 
Nature ici. Le resistance des autres rosiers ne se compare pas a ces 
deux grands. 

Meme si la nature ne nous favorise pas tellement, je demeure 
toujours convaincu que cette culture est une source de grande satis- 
faction; un bouton de rose qui commence a s'ouvrir, y a-t-il quelque 
chose de plus merveilleux? 

J'espere que l'annee du centenaire nous reserve une grande 
surprise : un ete de trois mois. 

NORTHERN NEW BRUNSWICK — 
L. A. Miller, Dalhousie, N.B. 

This has been a wonderful season for roses here. Winter-kill was 
comparatively low during 1965-66, approximately 10%, and some 
of this was caused by soda ash as described in my last report. This 
year the chemical company did a much better job of transporting this 
dangerous chemical. 

We had a lovely warm summer with just enough rain for good 
growth but not enough to cause blackspot. The result was that my 
garden produced the best roses in the past 14 years. I tried a bed of the 
new Miss Canada and these made a very nice showing. I was a little 
disappointed in the way it lasted and opened when cut, but all in all, 
I was well pleased with this rose. I also tried three of the "so-called" 
Centennial rose. It seems a shame that so much publicity has been 

137 



given to this American Rose for, although it is a fair orange flori- 
bunda, the same results could have been obtained if this group had 
co-operated with our Society and we would have had a true Canadian 
Rose that both groups could have used to help celebrate our 100th 
birthday. 

Peace, Crimson Glory, Ena Harkness, Virgo and Chrysler 
Imperial were very good in the hybrid teas. American Heritage and 
Matterhorn were tried, with very good success. 

Vogue is still my best floribunda, but I find that it is getting 
harder each year to purchase this variety. 

Queen Elizabeth continues to be outstanding among the grandi- 
floras, but John S Armstrong, Starfire and Buccaneer also did very 
well. 

Tree roses are still my favorites. These have had a wonderful 
year and my only trouble with these has been when I do not prune 
severely enough and the heads get too> big and heavy for the stems. 

Insects and disease were not a problem this season. I started 
with a fungicide spray when the plants were dormant and as soon 
as growth started, I alternated weekly between a spray and a dusting 
with all-purpose combined insecticide and fungicide. It is quite easy 
to have a good healthy rose bush in June but the appearance of the 
same plant in September will testify to the care given to it through 
the season. 

NORTHEASTERN NOVA SCOTIA — Ronald P. Spencer, 

Mulgrave 

The season of 1966 has proven to be in my estimation about as 
perfect a growing season for roses in this district as any I have seen. 

The winter was comparatively mild with little snow and only 
one real cold snap. Promises of an early spring were, however, dashed, 
with the arrival of unseasonably cold weather in late April and early 
May, so that I was not able to complete my plantings until the middle 
of May. Beyond any doubt, after this past spring, I have come to the 
conclusion that it is not our winters which chill the life from our rose 
canes, but rather the bitter, miserable late springs which have been on 
the increase of late years. 

June was cool with some rain, but the roses came into good 
growth despite the low temperatures. For the second time in nine 

138 



years I tried a programme of foliar feeding and this gave wonderful 
growth and colouring to my evergreens and shrubs, as well as my 
roses. The first fully opened bloom appeared on July 5 th, and by 
July 10th all the plants, including the climbers, were coming into full 
bloom. 

In July, while travelling through Cape Breton Island, I dis- 
covered a deserted farm house many miles along the shore of the beau- 
tiful Bras d'Or Lakes. Up the walls of the house were thousands of 
rose shrubs : at one and the same time a fairyland of rose blooms and 
a nightmare of brambles. It was a picture beyond describing. I have 
been unable to determine just what type they were, but individual 
bushes averaged five feet in height, with very small, fully double, 
flat, soft pink blooms with little or no scent, and looked like a double 
form of perhaps Rosa canina. 

This year my new scented garden really came into its own, and 
I am very well pleased with the performance of those roses planted 
last year. They are all quite hardy, with "Lai" by far the earliest to 
come into full bloom. I am also most impressed with "Sterling 
Silver" with its strong perfume, with its beautiful flowers borne in 
clusters of three or singly to a stem. "Shot Silk" is also admired here, 
its blooms opening to perfection in the cool fall air. 

Each year finds modern rose growing in this area on the up- 
swing. Four years ago there were only forty plants growing in ten 
gardens within a twenty-mile radius of the Canso Strait area; now 
there are well over two hundred plants in over twenty gardens in the 
same area. 

I decided last winter to establish a large garden of "old 
fashioned" roses, and Harkness of England were good enough to 
furnish me with a plan to suit my property. This I had hoped to com- 
plete by fall, but have had to postpone it for a short time. I have 
been quite interested in a further study of vanishing roses and am in 
the process of building up a library on the subject. 

The roses in this area this year grew to terrific size. "Siren" 
reached five feet, "Sutter's Gold" six, while "Frensham" attained 
six feet in height and was almost as wide. "Super Star" also reached 
six feet. Several of the shrub roses reached a height of six and seven 
feet and were almost as wide. Among these were "Halali", "Zitronen- 
falter", "Lavender Lassie", "Diligent" and "Nymphenburg". All of 

139 



these plants are only three years old and it is amazing what they can 
do in a good season. 

Last year I tried the new floribunda from England called 
"Innisfree". I was far from pleased with its performance, but this 
year it improved and last week it had a cluster of blooms which bore 
little resemblance to those of the past. If it could only do the same 
in early summer, I would not complain at all. Another new plant 
for me this year, "Woburn Abbey", is showing signs of becoming 
an outstanding rose. It is almost a true orange in the heat of summer, 
with a hint of red and yellow in the fall ; it appears healthy and has 
a sweet perfume. 

In closing, from the Canso Strait area, northeastern Nova 
Scotia, the Spencers wish all our readers the best of luck for the 1967 
season. 

NOVA SCOTIA SOUTH SHORE — G. H. Christie, Barrington 
Passage 

Roses are still blooming but a very chill autumn day is in progress. 
This is October 6th and, if things go as usual, we should have three 
more weeks of bloom although at this time of year it's patchy. 

This has been another variation of the typical south shore year. 
New growth was noted in early March and progressed until the last 
of that month. After that chill weather set in and it was well into 
May before any significant leafing occurred. Then came the great 
dry spell, the least rain in ninety-nine years, up until September. It 
was dryer even than last year. Consequently we had a great first 
bloom but a light follow-up. 

In closing I would like to mention a few of the additions we 
made to our garden in 1966. First, I was very pleased with Miss 
Canada. We found it a prolific bloomer and the color pleasing and 
different. Diplomat, a deep red with a fine fragrance, turned out 
more blooms than any red of its quality we have ever seen. Finally, 
we were taken by a late season purchase and a real charmer: Color 
Wonder. While the flowers seem small, the coloring will make it a 
stand-out in any garden. 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND — Dr. R. G. Lea, Charlottetown 

Rose growing in this district this year turned out to be a confusing 
paradox. Climatic conditions were such that we should have had 

140 



an outstanding year, but we didn't. It was spotty — some gardens 
had uniformly good results — others had a tremendous early show 
followed by a very rapid tapering off with a very poor second crop 
and only mediocre autumn flowering. My own garden fell in the 
latter class. 

To begin with the winter — conditions for roses were ideal — 
a moderate covering of snow with no really cold weather. Spring 
came early and was a succession of splendid days. Roses were 
showing red eyes as early as March 20th, a full six weeks ahead of 
average, and the bushes were well leafed out in early May, again 
away ahead of the usual time. There was virtually no winterkill 
reported anywhere. Growing conditions were ideal all Spring and 
early summer, and the first crop of blooms, which occurred at about 
its usual time, despite the early Spring, was excellent. However, this 
coincided with our first heat wave and their glory was much shorter 
lived than usual. The heat wave ushered in a prolonged dry spell, 
and this, it appears, did the damage. The combination of the extra- 
ordinary bloom production that occurred because of the ideal Spring 
conditions, the unusual heat, and the long dry spell was too much 
for all but the hardy roses. Even where artificial watering was done, 
results were poor. The characteristic of this year's condition was 
the scarcity of new basal cones in mid-season to provide the new 
growth for later in the season. Old well established bushes were not 
too badly affected, but small bushes, and new plantings gained very 
little during the year, and will not be in good shape to withstand the 
rigors of even an ordinary winter. Not all gardens were so affected 
this summer. Those with a large percentage of old well established 
bushes, or that were located so that they received some protection 
from the sun, had their usual good year, but the general trend was 
toward poor results. 

We were unable to hold a rose show this year, but plans are 
already under way to resume it again next year. The stimulus of 
meeting and competing with others who share ones enthusiasm for 
roses, was missed, and we look forward to the pleasure and excite- 
ment of a show again next year. 

ANNAPOLIS VALLEY — Mrs. O. H. Antoft, Kentville, NS. 

The mild weather which prevailed during the last winter made up 
for the lack of protecting snow cover, so our roses came through with 

141 



flying colours; only one bush was lost on a remote exposed spot where 
the boys forgot the customary protection. 

But the dry weather we had experienced the whole season in 1965 
stayed with us from the start of the year right up to this late November 
date, so again we were dependent on irrigation. Nevertheless, we have 
had a very beautiful rose season. Indeed, we have never before seen a 
more continuous bloom in any other year, helped along because the fall 
bloom started much earlier than usual, following right after the end 
of the summer show. It displayed the same richness and continuity as 
the summer bloom, which is very unusual for our location. The reason 
for this I associate with the cool temperatures during the summer 
months, with none of the heat-waves so damaging both to the dura- 
tion of the bloom and the start of new bud formation. In addition, fall 
was mild with none of the customary frosty nights. 

Amongst the new varieties in our gardens this year, the following 
were especially outstanding: "Colour Wonder", an eye-catcher with 
its large full blooms and colour contrasts; "Fragrant Cloud", another 
much admired newcomer, more so for its enchanting fragrance; 
"Vienna Charm", with its unusual colour that really attracts notice; 
"Summer Sunshine", an excellent non-fading yellow; "Melrose"; 
"Swarthmore" ; and "Westminster" also received many favourable 
comments. In the newest Floribundas, "Manx Queen", which in the 
bud stage is often mistaken for "Piccadilly"; "Ambrosia" with its 
unusual brilliant amber colours; "Europeana" in the dark red coveted 
colour; "Elizabeth of Glamis" with its glory and delicate fragrance; 
and "Telstar", the very refined and charming beauty, all were ex- 
tremely popular. 

All the old popular varieties still enjoy a great number of admirers : 
the reds, yellows and bicolours. For some strange reasons, which still 
puzzles us, the pinks, in all their different shades, have only a few fans 
here in the Maritimes. 

Our ever-blooming climbers were indeed ever-blooming and very 
lovely, with the dark red "Don Juan" being the most popular. "Royal 
Gold" and "Golden Showers" ran a close second, all with a wealth of 
bloom. 

With all this glamour and beauty, we wonder if the future can 
bring anything surpassing what we have already seen. 



142 



The Rose Analysis 



Compiled and Edited by 
Mrs. W. A. MacDonald 
/ 74 Baltimore Road, 
Winnipeg 13, Manitoba 

Readers who study the accompanying tables will notice that there 
are quite a few changes in the position of the Newer Hybrid Teas. 
Isobel de Ortiz continues in high esteem in both East and West. Mr. 
Lincoln has zoomed to first place in the East, but still remains in 15th 
place in the opinion of growers in the West. Vienna Charm and 
Fragrant Cloud have made significant gains in both sections of the 
country. Among several newcomers, Miss Canada naturally attracts 
our attention in 1967, and it will be interesting to watch her progress 
during the coming season. 

Among Newer Floribundas, Elizabeth of Glamis and Woburn 
Abbey have moved up markedly, while the table of Newer Grandi- 
floras shows Mt. Shasta and Camelot on top in both areas. Few reports 
were received on Newer Climbers. Joseph's Coat took second place in 
both East and West. 

Among Beginners' and General Garden Roses, Peace retains first 
place in the East, and in the West has replaced Burnaby at the top. 
Peace's "majority", however, has been somewhat reduced. Super 
Star ( Tropicana ) has gained notably in both regions. 

Among Roses introduced before 1962, the tables for Climbers 
show little change. As for the Floribundas, positions have changed, but 
most of the roses listed are the same as in last year's report. Among 
Grandifloras, the same three varieties occupy the top spots in the 
Eastern Table, while the same five hold the first five positions in the 
West. 

As far as Miniatures are concerned, it will be noted that the East 
and West lists have been amalgamated this year. Sixteen of the varie- 
ties were on last year's lists; of the remaining four, Little Buckaroo is 

143 



making a comeback, and the other three — Beauty Secret, Baby Dar- 
ling and New Fanny — are newcomers to the Analysis. 

A note re the request for an "E" to denote Exhibition quality: the 
response was very disappointing, but it is interesting to note that 
opinions seem to agree on some of the varieties that were not con- 
sidered exhibition roses. No reporter, for example, considered Gran- 
ada or Colour Wonder to be of exhibition quality. 

I would like to extend my thanks to all those reporters without 
whose knowledge and effort this Analysis would have been impossible. 
I would like to see more contributors to this feature and next year 
welcome reports from others who would be willing to give us the 
benefit of their observation and experience. 



144 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS 



EAST 

Mrs. O. H. Antoft. R.R. 1. Kentville. X.S. 

Mr. O. E. Bowles. 22 Cameron Crescent. Leaside. Toronto 17. Ont. 

Mr. H. Cross, 702 Churchill Place, Baie d'Urfe. Que. 

Mr. C. A. Davis. 3143 West River Parkway. Grand Island.. X.Y. 

Dr. R. A. Fleming. Vineland Station. On:. 

Mr. E. Goulding. 96 Cheltenham Avenue, Toronto. Ont. 

Mrs. V. Hawkins, 529 Deloraine Avenue. Toronto 12, Ont. 

Mr. E. Jubien. 150 Vivian Avenue, Montreal 16. Que. 

Dr. R. G. Lea. 1 Green Street, Charlottetown. P.E.I. 

Mr. W. Lyzaniwsky, 2 "6 Betty Ann Drive. Willowdale. On:. 

Mr. M. McXally, "2 Brunswick Street. Trim: . X.S. 

Mr. L. A. Miller,' P.O. Box 408, Dalhousie, X.B. 

Dr. C. T. Movie, 12 Forsyth Place. Hamilton. On:. 

Mr. G. J. Patterson. "7 Marion Avenue X\. Hamilton. On:. 

Mr. H. C. Westbrook. 48 Prospect Avenue, Port Arthur, Ont. 



WEST 

Mr. R. G. Cobbold. 36"4 Hoskins Stree:. Xorth Vancouver. B.C. 

Mr. J. A. Davidson. 1454 Haywood Avenue. West Vancouver. B.C. 

Mr. J. H. Eddie, 4050 West 41s: Avenue. Vancouver. B.C. 

Mrs. W. A. MacDonald. 174 Baltimore Road, Winnipeg 13. Man. 

Mrs. M. E. Matthews. "34 Francis Road, Richmond, B.C. 

Mrs. D. McCracken, 1734 Glass Avenue, Spokane. Wash. 

Mr. J. H. McGhie. 27 East 63rd Avenue. Vancouver 15. B.C. 

Mrs. J. McLachlan. 7040 Ontario Street, Vancouver 15. B.C. 

Mrs. C. W. Morton. 4150 Burkehiil Road. West Vancouver. B.C. 

Mrs. R. E. Murdock. _ "85 Crescenrview Drive. Xorth Vancouver, B.C. 

Mr. F. X. Parker. Westholme. Vancouver Island. B.C. 

Mr. A. Selwood. 1450 West 40th Avenue, Vancouver 13. B.C. 

Mr. Preston Sharpe, 1990 West 19th Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C. 

Mr. S. Simpson. 2312 W. Bridge Avenue. Spokane. Wash. 99201 

Dr. Paul B. Smith. 92" Medical Arts Bldg.. Tacoma 2. Wash. 

Mr. Harvey Sparling, Portage la Prairie, Man. 

Mrs. W. H. Walkinshaw. 242" West 36th Avenue. Vancouver 13. B.C. 



145 



1. NEWER ROSES, H.T. 
Introduced in Canada or the US. A. in 1962 or later 

EAST 



Posi- 






Intro- 






tion 


Name 




duced 


• 

Points 


C OloUT 


1. 


*Mister Lincoln 


hi 


loo 


1 OCR 

iyoo 


Deep crimson 


2. 


*Isobel de Ortiz 


E 


164 


# 1962 


Deep rose-pink, silver 
reverse 


3. 


Chicago Peace 


E 


163 


# 1962 


Soft light pink 


4. 


*Royal Highness 
^rragrant Liioud. 


h, 


1 CO 

102 


44- 1 ncn 

# 1962 


Phlox pink, yellow base 


c 

0. 


hi 


1 A A 

14o 


1 QC/I 

iyo4 


Vermilion-scarlet 


c 
O. 


*Granada 






1 ncQ 

196J 


Pink, carmine, yellow 
blend 


/. 


Miss Canada 


E 


1 1 ^ 


1 QC4 

iyo4- 


Rose madder, silver 
reverse 


o 
o. 


Summer Sunshine 


E 


1U1 


44- 1 Q£9 


Deep yellow 


Q 

y. 


Matterhorn 


E 


QQ 

yy 


iyoo 


Whit-** 
vv niie 


10. 


American Heritage E 


87 


1965 


Ivory/ salmon blend, 












picotee effect 


l 1. 


Pascali 


E 


oo 


iyoo 


wnite 


1 0 


*Papa Meilland 


E 


0/ 


1 QCQ 

iyoo 


Deep velvety red 


1 d 
1 J. 


^Vienna Charm 


E 


HH 
00 


1 QCQ 

iyoo 


Coppery orange 




Colour Wonder 




01 


1 QC 1 

lyb'f 


Salmon-opal, sulphur- 
yellow reverse 




*Sabine 


E 


44 


i yo j 


Deep rose 


lo. 


*Uncle Walter 


E 


AO 


1 QCQ 

iyoo 


Kea 


17. 


*Oklahoma 


E 


36 


1964 


Dark red 


18 


*Eiffel Tower 




34 


1963 


medium pink 


19. 


Swarthmore 1 


E 


33 


1964 


Fuchsia-red 




Kronenbourg J 


E 


33 


1965 


Crimson/ yellow bi-colour 


20. 


Intermezzo ) 


E 


32 


1963 


Lavender 




*Melrose ) 


E 


32 


1963 


Creamy white, overlaid 
cherry-red 



WEST 



1. 


*Fragrant Cloud 


E 


226 


1964 


Vermilion-scarlet 


2. 


*Royal Highness 


E 


213 


#1962 


Soft light pink 


3. 


Chicago Peace 


E 


211 


#1962 


Phlox-pink, yellow base 


4. 


*Isabel de Ortiz 


E 


189 


#1962 


Deep rose-pink, silver 
reverse 


5. 


* Granada 




176 


1963 


Pink, carmine, yellow 
blend 


6. 


* Swarthmore 


E 


167 


1964 


Fuschia-red 


7. 


Summer Sunshine 


E 


162 


#1962 


Deep yellow 


8. 


Pascali 


E 


161 


1963 


White 


9. 


*Sabine 


E 


153 


1963 


Venetian pink, azalea 
pink 


10. 


Jamaica 




145 


1965 


Glowing rose-red 


11. 


*Milord 




143 


#1962 


Crimson-scarlet 


12. 


Miss Canada 


E 


134 


1964 


Rose madder, silver 
reverse 


13. 


*Vienna Charm 


E 


132 


1963 


Coppery-orange 


14. 


^Legendary 
*Mister Lincoln 


E 


131 


#1962 


Pale pink 


15. 


E 


127 


1965 


Rich red 


16. 


*Uncle Walter 


E 


121 


1963 


Red 


17. 


*Papa Meilland 
*Helene Schoen 


E 


115 


1963 


Dark red 


18. 


E 


114 


#1962 


Deep red 


19. 


Sincera 


E 


96 


1963 


White 


20. 


*Oklahoma 


E 


82 


1964 


Dark red 



"^Noticeably fragrant 
#Last year on New Roses' List 
E Indicates Exhibition quality 



1. NEWER ROSES, FLORIBUNDAS 
Introduced in Canada or the U.S.A. in 1962 or later 

EAST 



Posi- 






Intro- 




tion 


Name 


Points 


duced 


Colour 


1. 


*Elizabeth of Glamis 


102 


1964 


Deep salmon 


9. 


*Woburn Abbey 


79 


#1962 


Tangerine 


3. 


^Chinatown 


75 


1963 


Deep yellow 


4. 


Saratoga 


65 


1963 


White 


5. 


Sea Pearl 


57 


1964 


Pearly pink, suffused 
peach and cream 


6. 


Europeana 
*Paddy McGredy 


53 


1963 


Deep blood-red 


7. 


52 


#1962 


Carmine, lighter reverse 


8. 


Scarlet Queen 


51 


#1962 


Orange-scarlet 




Elizabeth 






9. 


Evelyn Fison 


38 


#1962 


Scarlet 


10. 


*Telstar 


37 


1963 


Orange to orange-buff 


11. 


*Apricot Nectar 


28 


1965 


Apricot 


12. 


Rose of Tralee 


26 


1964 


Rose-pink blend 


13. 


*Manx Queen 


25 


1963 


Gold, with orange tips 


14. 


Arabian Nights 


23 


1963 


Orange-scarlet 


15. 


Diamant (Diamond) 


22 


#1962 


Orange-red 


lb. 


Unarlotte Llizabetn 


OA 

20 


1 ncr 

lybo 


Rose-pink 


17. 


Ambrosia 


19 


1963 


Brilliant amber 


18. 


*The Farmer's Wife 


17 


#1962 


Light pink 


19. 


Palm Springs 


16 


1965 


Reddish orange to gold 








base 


20. 


Ascot ^ 


15 


#1962 


Salmon-coral 




Gold Topaz > 


15 


1963 


Golden orange 




Marlena ' 


15 


1964 


Crimson 



WEST 



1. 


^Elizabeth of Glamis ) 


202 


1964 


Deep salmon 




*Woburn Abbey j 


202 


#1962 


Tangerine 


2. 


* Paddy McGredy 


198 


#1962 


Carmine, lighter reverse 


3. 


Evelyn Fison 


195 


#1962 


Scarlet 


4. 


Ginger 


178 


#1962 


Orange-red 


5. 


*The Farmer's Wife 


177 


#1962 


Light pink 


6. 


Saratoga 


171 


1963 


White 


7. 


^Chinatown 


170 


1963 


Yellow 


8. 


Europeana 


160 


1963 


Deep blood-red 


9. 


Violet Carson 


155 


1963 


Peach-pink, silver reverse 


10. 


Diamant (Diamond) 


153 


#1962 


Orange-red 


11. 


Sea Pearl 


149 


1964 


Pearly pink, suffused 
peach and cream 


12. 


Scarlet Queen 


143 


#1962 


Scarlet 




Elizabeth 






13. 


Marlena 


139 


1964 


Crimson 


14. 


*Telstar 


125 


1963 


Orange to orange-buff 


15. 


Bambi 


122 


#1962 


Light apricot-pink 


16. 


*Apricot Nectar 


120 


1965 


Apricot 


17. 


New Europe 


116 


1964 


Vermilion 


18. 


Ascot 


105 


1962 


Salmon-coral 


19. 


Bossa Nova 


88 


1964 


Yellow^ 


20. 


Charlotte Elizabeth ) 


86 


1965 


Deep pink 


Blue Diamond f 


86 


1964 


Lavender 



^Noticeably fragrant 
#Last year on Newer Roses' List 

147 



1. NEWER ROSES, GRANDIFLORAS AND CLIMBERS 

Introduced in Canada or the U.S.A. in 1962 or later 



EAST 



Posi- 






Intro- 




tion 


Name 


Points 


duced 


Colour 




GRANDIFLORAS 








1. 


Camelot 


78 


1964 


Luminous coral-pink 


2. 


Mt Shasta 


76 


1963 


White 


3. 


Yellow Queen 


20 


1964 


Medium yellow 




Elizabeth 






4. 


Floriade 


18 


1963 


Orange blend 


5. 


Garden State 


17 


1965 


Deep pink 




CLIMBERS 








1. 


Casino 


18 


1963 


Medium yellow 


2. 


Joseph's Coat 


8 


1963 


Yellow, flushed, cherry- 










red 



WEST 





GRANDIFLORAS 








1. 


Mt. Shasta 


180 


1963 


White 


2. 


Camelot 


153 


1964 


Luminous coral-pink 


3. 


*Governor Mark 


138 


#1962 


Red 




Hatfield 








4. 


Garden State 


110 


1964 


Deep pink 


5. 


Ole 


109 


1964 


Orange-red 


6. 


Floriade 


98 


1963 


Orange blend 


7. 


Jantzen Girl 


94 


#1962 


Red 




CLIMBERS 








1. 


Golden Cascade 


161 


#1962 


Chrome yellow 


2. 


Joseph's Coat 


154 


1963 


Yellow, flushed cherry- 


3. 


*Viking Queen 


18 


1963 


red 








Medium to deep pink 



*Noticeably fragrant 
# Last year on Newer Roses' List 



148 



2. BEGINNERS' AND GENERAL GARDEN ROSES, H.T. 
Introduced in Canada or the US. A. before 1962 



(See also 'Newer Roses 3 List) 



EAST 


Posi- 








Intro- 




tion 


Name 




• 

Points 


i 

aucea 


Colour 


1 

l. 


Peace 


h> 


ZOO 


iy4 , o 


• 

Yellow, edged pink 


I. 


*Super Star 


E 


155 


1960 


Light vermilion 




(Tropicana) 
^Js.ordes Perlecta 








3. 


h 


206 


1957 


Cream, edged deep pink 


4. 


*Crimson Glory 


E 


194 


1935 


Deep crimson 


c 

D. 


1 in any 


T7 


1 JO 

143 


1954 


Pink, gold base 


c 
0. 


^unrysler imperial 


hi 


141 


1952 


Deep crimson 


/. 


Micnele Meilland 


hi 


120 


1 f\A C 

1945 


Pink, tinged coral 


o 

O. 


*Karl Herbst 


hi 


108 


1950 


Scarlet to deep red 


y. 


Garden Party 


hi 


99 


1959 


Cream, edged pink 


1U. 


♦Ena Harkness 


E 


89 


1946 


Glowing red 


1 1 
11. 


♦Diamond Jubilee 


E 


o/ 


1 QA. 1 


Cream, orange-buff 


12. 


♦Wendy Gussons 


E 


80 


1960 


Deep cerise 


13. 


Virgo 


E 


79 


1947 


White 


14. 


*Pink Peace 


E 


71 


1959 


Deep dusty pink 


15. 


♦Sutter's Gold 




57 


1949 


Yellow, flushed pink 


16. 


♦Gail Borden 


E 


54 


1957 


Rose-pink, cream reverse 


17. 


♦Piccadilly 
♦King's Ransom 




50 


1959 


Red and yellow 


18. 


E 


49 


1961 


Yellow 


19. 


♦Charlotte Armstrong 


48 


1940 


Spectrum-red to cerise 


20. 


Burnaby 


E 


43 


1951 


Creamy yellow 


WEST 


l. 


Peace 


E 


271 


1946 


Yellow, edged pink 


2. 


♦Wendy Gussons 


E 


266 


1960 


Deep cerise 


3. 


♦Super Star 


E 


264 


1960 


Light vermilion 




(Tropicana) 








4. 


Burnaby 
♦Mischief 


E 


226 


1951 


Creamy yellow 


5. 


E 


223 


1961 


Vermilion, pale orange 
reverse 


6. 


♦Prima Ballerina 


E 


222 


1958 


Cherry-pink 


7. 


♦King's Ransom 


E 


221 


1961 


Yellow 


8. 


♦Crimson Glory 


E 


211 


1935 


Deep crimson 


9. 


♦Chrysler Imperial 


E 


210 


1952 


Deep crimson 


10. 


♦Show Girl 


E 


181 


1946 


Deep rose-pink 


11. 


Pink Favourite 


E 


165 


1956 


Pink 


12. 


♦Kordes' Perfecta 


E 


153 


1957 


Cream, edged deep pink 


13. 


Golden Giant 


E 


149 


1961 


Golden yellow 




(Goldrausch) 








14. 


♦Josephine Bruce 


E 


141 


1953 


Dark crimson 


15. 


Rose Gaujard 
♦Sutter's Gold 


E 


122 


1958 


White, pink, silver reverse 


16. 




120 


1949 


Yellow, flushed pink 


17. 


♦Avon 


E 


110 


1961 


Bright red 


18. 


Michele Meilland 




109 


1954 


Pink, tinged coral 


19. 


♦Rubaiyat 


E 


107 


1946 


Rose-red 


20. 


♦Diamond Jubilee 


E 


102 


1947 


Cream, orange-buff 



♦Noticeably fragrant 
E Indicates Exhibition Quality 



149 



3. CLIMBING AND RAMBLING ROSES 
Introduced in Canada or the U.S.A. before 1962 



EAST 



Posi- 






Intro- 




tion 


Name 


Points 


duced 


Colour 


1. 


Blaze 


117 


1932 


Scarlet 


I. 


New Dawn 


96 


1930 


Pale soft pink 


Q 

5. 


*T\— T TT AT' 1 

*Dr. J. H. Nicolas 


70 


1940 


Rose-pink 


A. 


*Danse du Feu 
(Spectacular) 


56 


1953 


Scarlet-red 


5. 


Paul's Scarlet 


48 


1916 


Scarlet 


6. 


*Golden Showers 


47 


1956 


Daffodil-yellow 


7. 


*Don Juan 


46 


1958 


Dark velvety red 


8. 


*Gladiator 


39 


1955 


Rose-red 


o 

y. 


*Coral Dawn 


37 


1952 


Rose-pink 


10. 


*Zepherine Drouhin 


36 


1868 


Rose, white base 


11. 


*Jblegance 
*Dorotny Perkins 


33 


1938 


Spectrum yellow 


1 o 

12. 


32 


1901 


Rose-pink 


13. 


American Pillar 


30 


1902 


Carmine, with white eye 


14. 
It*. 


*Blossomtime 






Cameo-pink, reverse 
spinel-pink 


15. 


*Aloha 


27 


1949 


Rose-pink, deeper reverse 


16. 


*High Noon 
*Paul's Lemon Pillar 


25 


1946 


Bright yellow 


17. 


24 


1915 


Pale lemon 


18. 


*Guinee 


21 


1938 


Blackish garnet 


19. 


*Parade 


20 


1953 


Deep rose-pink 


20. 


*Dr. W. van Fleet ) 


18 


1910 


Pale soft pink 


*Royal Gold [ 


18 


1957 


Golden yellow 


WEST 


l. 


*Danse du Feu 
(Spectacular) 


189 


1953 


Scarlet-red 


2. 


Blaze 


173 


1932 


Scarlet 


3. 


*C1. Mrs. Sam McGredy 


142 


1937 


Coppery-orange 


4. 


*Goral Dawn 


133 


1952 


Rose-pink 


5. 


*Paul's Lemon Pillar 


129 


1915 


Pale lemon 


6. 


*C1. Shot Silk 


123 


1931 


Cerise, yellow base 


7. 


Zenith (Uetersen) 


118 


1939 


Glowing red 


8. 


*Parkdirektor Riggers 


111 


1957 


Velvety crimson 


9. 


*Dr. J. H. Nicolas 


108 


1940 


Pale pink 


10. 


*Blossomtime 


104 


1951 


Cameo-pink, spinel-pink 
reverse 


11. 


*Guinee 


88 


1938 


Blackish garnet 


12. 


*Aloha 


84 


1949 


Rose-pink, deeper reverse 


13. 


*Don Juan 


80 


1958 


Dark velvety red 


14. 


*High Noon 
*Meg 


79 


1946 


Bright yellow 


15. 


77 


1954 


Salmon-apricot ; red 
stamens 


16. 


*Gladiator 


76 


1955 


Rose-red 


17. 


Paul's Scarlet 


72 


1916 


Scarlet 


18. 


New Dawn 


70 


1930 


Pale, soft pink 


19. 


*Royal Sunset 
*Golden Showers 


69 


1960 


Apricot 


20. 


68 


1956 


Daffodil yellow 



*Noti.ceably fragrant 



150 



4. FLORIBUNDA ROSES 
Introduced in Canada or the US. A. before 1962 



EAST 



Posi- 






Intro- 




tion 


Name 


Points 


duced 


Colour 


1. 


*Fashion 


211 


1949 


Salmon-peach 


2. 


Frensham 


140 


1948 


Scarlet-crimson 


3. 


*Little Darling 


124 


1956 


Red, orange, rose blend 


4. 


Iceberg 


115 


1958 


Pure white 


5. 


*Vogue 


113 


1951 


Deep coral-cherry 


6. 


"^Independence 


112 


1949 


Orange-scarlet 


7. 


Masquerade 


109 


1949 


Yellow, pink, red 


8. 


Alain 


97 


1948 


Scarlet-crimson 


9. 


*Spartan 
*Ivory Fashion 


91 


1954 


Reddish salmon-orange 


10. 


81 


1958 


White 


11. 


Orangeade 
*Allgold 


79 


1959 


Bright orange 


12. 


76 


1958 


Yellow 


1 Q 

lo. 


T "11" *\ JT 1 ^ ^ 

Lilli Marlene 


/l 


1959 


Scarlet-red 


14. 


*Daily Sketch 


61 


1961 


Pink and silver bi-colour 


15. 


*Circus 


58 


1956 


Yellow, salmon-pink 


16. 


Korona 


57 


1955 


Orange-scarlet 


17. 


Else Poulsen 


47 


1924 


Rose-pink 


18. 


Highlight 


44 


1957 


Orange-scarlet 


19. 


Orange Triumph 


37 


1937 


Salmon-red,, shaded 
orange 


20. 


Fusilier 


36 


1957 


Orange-scarlet 



WEST 



1. 


*Little Darling 


206 


1956 


Red, orange, rose blend 


2. 


*Fashion 


202 


1949 


Salmon-peach 


3. 


*Vogue 


176 


1951 


Deep coral-cherry 


4. 


Orangeade 


165 


1959 


Bright orange 


5. 


Frensham 


162 


1948 


S carle t- crims on 


6. 


Sarabande 


161 


1959 


Light orange-red 


7. 


Lilli Marlene 


159 


1959 


Scarlet-red 


8. 


Iceberg 


151 


1958 


Pure white 


9. 


*Circus 


146 


1956 


Yellow, salmon-pink 


10. 


* Ivory Fashion 


144 


1958 


White 


11. 


*Allgold 


135 


1958 


Yellow 


12. 


Masquerade 


131 


1949 


Yellow, pink, red 


13. 


Dainty Maid 
*Spartan 


122 


1940 


Pink, carmine reverse 


14. 


121 


1954 


Reddish salmon-orange 


15. 


Orange Sensation 


120 


1961 


Light vermilion, orange 
base 


16. 


*Fire King 


118 


1959 


Vermilion 


17. 


"^Independence 


113 


1949 


Orange-scarlet 


18. 


*Daily Sketch 
*Dearest 


108 


1961 


Pink and silver bi-colour 


19. 


106 


1960 


Salmon-pink 


20. 


*Anna Wheatcroft 


104 


1959 


Vermilion 



^Noticeably fragrant 



151 



5. GRANDIFLORA ROSES 
Introduced in Canada or the U.S.A. before 1962 



EAST 



Posi- 






Intro- 




tion 


Name 


Points 


duced 


Colour 


1. 


*Queen Elizabeth 


226 


1954 


Clear pink 


2. 


Montezuma 


176 


1955 


Orange-salmon 


3. 


*Carrousel 


174 


1950 


Brilliant red 


4. 


*Pink Parfait 


164 


1960 


Pink blend 


5. 


John S. Armstrong 
*Buccaneer 


159 


1961 


Dark red 


6. 


119 


1952 


Yellow 


7. 


*Roundelay 


115 


1954 


Deep red 


8. 


El Capitan 


99 


1959 


Glowing cherry-red 


9. 


*Starfire 


77 


1959 


Currant-red 


10. 


Golden Girl 


75 


1959 


Yellow 


11. 


June Bride 


69 


1957 


White to cream 


12. 


Queen of Bermuda 


48 


1956 


Geranium-red, orange 


1 


*Merry Widow 




1 Qf^Q 


Velvety crimson 


14. 


Gold Coast 


34 


1958 


Clear yellow 


15. 


*Miss France 


30 


1955 


Coppery cinnabar 


16. 


*Burning Love 

(Brennende Liebe) 


28 


1956 


Scarlet 


17. 


Kommodore 


26 


1959 


Bright blood-red 


18. 


Dean Collins 


16 


1953 


Carmine 


19. 


Cherry Glow 


13 


1959 


Cherry-red 


20. 


*Gay Heart 


11 


1951 


Rose-pink 



WEST 



1. 


*Queen Elizabeth 


251 


1954 


Clear pink 


2. 


Montezuma 


198 


1955 


Orange-salmon 


3. 


*Pink Parfait 


188 


1960 


Pink Blend 


4. 


*Carrousel 


182 


1950 


Brilliant Red 


5. 


*Roundelay 


176 


1954 


Deep Red 


6. 


*Starfire 


174 


1959 


Currant-red 


7. 


John S. Armstrong 


151 


1961 


Dark red 


8. 


*Buccaneer 


144 


1952 


Yellow 


9. 


^Burning Love 


143 


1956 


Scarlet 




(Brennende Liebe) 






Glowing cherry-red 


10. 


El Capitan 


138 


1959 


11. 


Dean Collins 


134 


1953 


Carmine 


12. 


June Bride 
*War Dance 


128 


1957 


White to cream 


13. 


124 


1961 


Orange-scarlet 


14. 


*Gay Heart 
*Miss France 


121 


1951 


Rose-pink 


15. 


118 


1955 


Coppery-cinnabar 


16. 


*Paul Bunyan 


117 


1961 


Deep red 


17. 


Gold Coast 


111 


1958 


Clear yellow 


18. 


Trojan 


106 


1961 


Pastel pink, yellow reverse 


19. 


Queen of Bermuda 
*Govemor Rosselini 


104 


1956 


Geranium-red, orange 


20. 


94 


1958 


Red 



*Noticeably fragrant 



152 



6. MINIATURE ROSES 



EAST AND WEST 



Posi- 






Intro- 




tion 


Name 


Points 


duced 


Colour 


1. 


*Cinderella 


128 


1952 


White, tinged pink 


2. 


Goralin (Karolyn) 


115 


1955 


Coral-red 


3. 


*Red Imp (Maid 
Marion ) 


99 


1951 


Red 


4. 


*Baby Masquerade 


98 


1956 


Yellow and red blend 


5. 


*Rosina (Josephine 
Wheatcroft) 


70 


1951 


Yellow 


6. 


For You ( Pour Toi, 
ParaTi) 


68 


1946 


White 


7. 


Per la de Montserrat 


58 


1945 


Pink 


8. 


Yellow Doll 


51 


1962 


Yellow 


9. 


*Beauty Secret 


50 


1965 


Chrysanthemum crimson, 
cardinal red 


10. 


* Midget 


46 


1940 


Pink 


11. 


Perla de Alcanada 


44 


1944 


Red 


12. 


Scarlet Gem 


43 


1961 


Orange-red 


13. 


Baby Gold Star 


42 


1940 


Yellow 


14. 


New Penny 


40 


1962 


Coral to coral-pink, 








white base 


15. 


*Dian 


38 


1957 


Light red, deep pink 


16. 


*Dwarf King 


37 


1957 


Blood-red 


17. 


*Little Buckaroo 


36 


1956 


Bright red, white centre 


18. 


Tinker Bell 


33 


1954 


Pink 


19. 


Baby Darling 
*Sweet Fairy 


30 


1964 


Orange blend 


20. 


22 


1946 


Pink 



*Noticeably fragrant 



153 



The Clearing House 

Compiled and Edited by 
Harold C. Cross 
702 Churchill Place, Baie d'Urfe, Quebec 

The growth of our Society is indicated by the fact that 48 members, 
the largest number to date, have contributed this year to the Clearing 
House. Their helpful reports alone make possible this annual feature. 
The total number of appraisals in the aggregate is 1008, also the 
largest number to date. The number of newer varieties reported is 
246, slightly exceeded in 1964, when 250 were reported; inciden- 
tally this is explained by the fact that 37 miniatures were included 
that year. We would like to receive more reports on the newer roses 
in this class, and recover lost ground. We hope miniature growers 
will respond. 

It will be observed that every Canadian Province is represented 
among the reporters except one — Saskatchewan. Again we solicit 
your help in achieving complete representation. It may be of interest 
to point out that the 1956 Annual shows that 24 members parti- 
cipated in the Clearing House, of whom only five were from outside 
Ontario. Of this year's 48 reporters, 26 are from other Provinces. 
This is encouraging evidence of the Society's broadening, influence, 
we are becoming more truly national. 

Several valued reporters of other years have been unable to 
contribute this year, but we hope to have them back. We are grate- 
ful to all who have cooperated, especially to the several who are 
reporters for the first time. Once again we extend an invitation to 
all our members to participate in this Section. 

It is well-known that our members secure their rose bushes 
from three main sources : nurseries in Great Britain and Continental 
Europe, in the United States, and in Canada. It has been pointed 
out previously that there are differences as to type and colour 
descriptions, year of introduction, etc. in the American and British 
official publications; some of these variations may be detected in 



154 



our Canadian listing. In view of this element of confusion occasion- 
ally, the C.R.S. may now have reached the point where it should 
issue its own official Canadian classification. The actual primary 
registration of all roses, of course, is cared for internationally, at 
Columbus, Ohio. 

As in the past, this review is limited to roses introduced within 
the past five years, or to those which have been reported in the Annual 
for five years. We hope the information supplied in this section 
will be of interest and help to our members, after making due allow- 
ance for differences in climatic and seasonal conditions across the 
country. 



155 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS 



Antoft, Mrs. O. H., R.R.1, Kentville, N.S. 

Baillie, Mrs. J. H., 9 Burnhamthorpe Road, Islington, Ont. 

Bishop, Mr. A. E., 329 Morrison Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, Que. 

Bowles, Mr. O. E., 22 Cameron Crescent, Leaside, Toronto 17, Ont. 

Buckley, Mr. A. R., Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Ont. 

Collier, Mr. B. R., 1 1342-79th Street, Edmonton, Alta. 

Cross, Mr. H. C, 702 Churchill Place, Baie d'Urfe, Que. 

De Kelver, Mr. Adolph, 235 Pine Street, Port Arthur, Ont. 

Foot, Mrs. J. R., 131 Ballantyne Avenue South, Montreal West, Que. 

Frasier Jr., Mr. Miles, R.D. 1, Palatine Bridge, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Gallagher, Mrs. J. J., 'Glengariff', St. Gabriel de Brandon, Que. 

Goulding, Mr. E. D., 96 Cheltenham Avenue, Toronto, Ont. 

Grindle, Mr. Gordon H., 262 Whitney Street, Flin Flon, Man. 

Guadagni, Mrs. F., 1 6 Easton Avenue, Montreal West, Que. 

Hawkins, Mrs. L., 529 Deloraine Avenue, Toronto 12, Ont. 

Jacques, Miss M., 4227 5th Avenue S.W., Calgary, Alta. 

Jenkins, Mr. Stanley, 70 Rogers Avenue, London, Ont. 

Jubien, Mr. E. B., 150 Vivian Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, Que. 

Keenan, Mr. W. J., 107 Cortleigh Blvd., Toronto, Ont. 

Laffey, Mr. J. V., 78 Chatsworth Road, Toronto, Ont. 

Lea, Dr. R. G., 1 Green Street, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

MacDonald, Mrs. W. A., 174 Baltimore Road, Winnipeg, Man. 

MacPherson, Mr. E., 2856 W 39th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. 

Magee, Mr. George H., 775 Roselawn Drive, Windsor, Ont. 

Mason, Miss K. H., 452 Stanstead Avenue, Town of Mount Royal, Que. 

Mayer, Mr. Theo, 4524 Madison Avenue, Montreal, Que. 

McDougall, Mr. Peter A., 3 1 Learmont Drive, Weston, Ont. 

McNally, Mr. Martin G., 72 Brunswick Street, Truro, N.S. 

Meier, Mr. F. F., Box 5, Westholme, B.C. 

Miller, Mr. L. A., Box 408, Dalhousie, N.B. 

Morden, Mr. Ernest B., 1882 Norman Road, Windsor, Ont. 

Morin, Mr. L., Box 745, Prescott, Ont. 

Morrison, Mrs. George, Tara, Ont. 

Morton, Mrs. C. W., 4150 Burkehill Road, West Vancouver, B.C. 
Moyle, Dr. C. T., 12 Forsythe Place, Hamilton, Ont. 

Packard, Mrs. J. H., 822 South Spalding Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S.A. 
Parker, Mr. F. N., Mount Sicker Road, Westholme, B.C. 
Paton, Mrs. Gladys, Gander, Newfoundland 

Patterson, Mr. George J., 77 Marion Avenue North, Hamilton, Ont. 

Perrault, Mr. I. R., Box 244, Vankleek Hill, Ont. 

Selwood, Mr. Archie, 1450 West 40th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. 

Smith, Mrs. E. J., 36-1 7th Avenue, Roxboro, Que. 

Sparling, Mr. Harvey D., Portage La Prairie, Man. 

Spencer, Mr. Ronald P., Mulgrave, N.S. 

Westbrook, Mr. H. C, 48 Prospect Avenue, Port Arthur, Ont. 

White, Mr. Harold, 51 Elm Park Road, St. Vital, Man. 

Whitfield, Mr. Al, 10 Torrington Crescent, London, Ont. 

Whitlock, Mr. R. G., 1858 Park Avenue, London, Ont. 

The following abbreviations apply throughout: Plants — pis.; years — yrs.; 
Climbing — CI. ; Floribunda — Fl. ; Grandiflora — Gr. ; Hybrid Tea — H.T.; 
Large-flowered Climber — L.C. ; Shrub — S. ; Miniature — Min. 
ACE OF HEARTS (Herz As), H.T. (Tantau '63). Blood-red. Mr. Frasier 
(1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 26 in.) reports: a variety with nice exhibition blooms, but a slow 
bloomer — flowers exhibition form — no disease. Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 
25 in.) advises: bush repeated same performance as last year — blooms are medium 
size — too small for show purposes. 



156 



AFRICA STAR, Fl. (West '65). Mauve. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 14 in.) 
reports: this rose gave a poor performance — bore a few blooms in spring and 
fall of medium size — colour deeper than most mauves — plant had no vigour 

— will probably discard af ter another year. 

AHOI, Fl. (Tantau '64). Bright red. A new one which showed no vigour in 
its first year, writes Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 17 in.) — had a few blooms 
of medium size — foliage apparently disease-resistant. 

ALAMEIN, Fl. (McGredy '63). Oriental red. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 
in.) comments: showed excellent performance this year — medium-size semi- 
double blooms are borne in clusters and in quantity, long-lasiting — bush had 
appearance of being continually in flower — will increase stock. 

ALLEGRO, H.T. (Meilland int. G.&P. '64). Orange-red. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 

2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) is still happy with this vigorous bush, but would like more bloom 

— is there an inverse relationship between vigorous growth and bloom, he asks. 
Mr. De Kelver (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 50 in.) considers this a very good rose — lots of 
bloom on strong stems — upright and vigorous. Mr. Frasier ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 60 in. ) 
writes : an outstanding rose — blooms are of exhibition form — a good repeater. 
Miss Mason (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 58 in. ) comments : variety has excellent colour — 
large flowers on long stems — very vigorous. Mrs. Packard ( 2 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 60 in. ) 
still feels it is not as attractive as parent 'Soraya' — some blooms of exhibition 
quality — mildews. Mr. Whitlock (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 48 in.) states: bush is very 
tall and erect — blooms well-shaped — 'a surprise'. 

AMATSU-OTOME, H.T. (Teranichi '60). Creamy-yellow. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 

3 yrs. ; 24 in. ) comments : this is a yellow that is talked about — gave improved 
performance this year, but still too few blooms — some odd specimens may reach 
the show table. Mrs. Packard (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) reports: a nice plant with 
lots of flowers — glossy foliage — shows its 'Peace' ancestry, though not as large. 
Mr. Parker (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 26 in.) advises: made poor growth and had few 
flowers — of good form but yellow fades — no disease. (Last year for reporting 
this rose. ) 

AMBROSIA, Fl. (Dickson '63). Brilliant amber. The semi-double bloom of 
this variety is very arresting, reports Mrs. Antoft (4 pis.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) — slight 
fragrance — dwarf and bushy plant. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) states: 
this is a near single of distinct colour — 'one of the best'. Miss Mason (1 pi. ; 
2 yrs.; 24 in.) notes: variety has attractive colour that darkens quickly when 
open — only fair amount of bloom. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 15 in.) reports 
the same poor performance as last year — dwarf bush snowed no vigour — 
probably will discard. Mr. Parker (3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 48 in.) comments: good 
bushes with tall clean canes — produced blooms of attractive amber-red shade 

— disease free. 

AMERICANA, H.T. (Boerner '61). Bright red. Mrs. Antoft (12 pis.; 1, 2, 3 
yrs.; 42 in.) reports: variety blooms continuously, especially on older bushes — 
form and colour of high quality, and more so in the fall — fragrant. Mr. Bishop 
(2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) notes: has improved considerably in second year and 
produced more bloom — 'the more I see the better I like it'. Mr. De Kelver 
(2 pis; 1, 2 yrs.; 36 in.) states: form is good and flowers are long-lasting, non- 
fading — some fragrance. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 4 yrs.; 18 in.) writes: pro- 
duced a few exhibition blooms each year, but as a plant has to be coaxed — stems 
and foliage lack substance. For Dr. Lea (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ) this variety continued to 
produce excellent blooms in fair quantity — tends to be spindly — 'a good rose'. 
Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 4 yrs. ; 30 in. ) likes the large blooms of exhibition form and 
good colour — best in the fall — foliage must be watched for blackspot. (Last 
year ( 5 ) for reporting this rose. ) 

AMERICAN HERITAGE, H.T. (Lammerts '65). Cream edged salmon. Mr. 
Bishop (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) considers this rose a true winner with its beautiful 



157 



tapered buds and delicate colour combination — cut 14 blooms from one bush 
in late September for a lovely arrangement. Mr. Buckley (25 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) 
states: this rose performed well in our garden giving a large proportion of good, 
well-formed flowers — colour varied, i.e. good or washy — not 'one to rave over'. 
Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 48 in.) reports: bush of strong growth — flowers 
exhibition form, long-lasting — some mildew. Mr. Laffey (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) 
says: bloom was attractive but sparse — 'nothing special so far'. Dr. Lea (1 pi.; 

1 yr.) states: a very promising rose — flowers well-formed — healthy compact 
bush. Mr. Magee (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 42 in.) comments: a good variety — medium- 
sized buds of good form — mildews. Mr. Morden ( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 40 in. ) warns : 
must be disbudded carefully if exhibition bloom is desired — 'one of the best 
introductions of last 5 years'. Dr. Moyle (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 42 in.) observes: 
excellent bloom has high-centred form — 'seems one of the best of the new 
ones'. Mr. Miller (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 35 in.) advises: blooms are of good quality 
— ■ nice foliage, very tall. Mr. Patterson (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 40 in.) writes: the 
colour is lighter than I expected, better in the fall — fair number of blooms, 
which hold heads up well — quite vigorous bush — an exhibition rose. Mr. 
Perrault (1 pi.; 24 in.) notes: this is not too vigorous, although healthy — 
beautiful buds, otherwise a 'made in Japan' 'Peace' — at the price would not 
recommend it. 

AMERICA'S JUNIOR MISS, Fl. (J.&P. '64). Coral-pink. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 

2 yrs. ; 30 in.; comments: its H.T.-type blooms are very long-lasting — growth 
strong and spreading. Mrs. Packard (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) finds variety dis- 
appointing, too many blemished blooms — lots of mildew — too many others are 
better. 

ANNA WHEATCROFT, Fl. (Tantau int. Edmunds '62). Light vermilion. Miss 
Mason (1 pi. ; 1 yr.; 20 in.) advises: flowers on this variety grow singly, of 
mixed pink shades — 'a most attractive rose'. 

ANNE WATKINS, H.T. (Watkins '63). Apricot with cream shadings. Mrs. 
Antoft (6 pis.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) observes: very floriferous for first year — blooms 
of beautiful form and high quality — slightly fragrant. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 
36 in.) notes: this is an upright bush — exhibition- type flowers open slowly — 
repeats — no disease. Mr. Jubien (4 pis.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) says: 'sure has a place 
in my garden' — continuous in bloom — nice shape, with good petals. Mrs. 
Packard ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 50 in. ) writes : very unhappy here — blooms are poor 
faded colour with black centre. Mr. Parker (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 48 in.) comments: 
not enough blooms, which are medium-size and of pleasing colour — tall stems. 
Mr. Patterson (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 40 in.) suggests there are not enough petals on 
blooms, and not enough blooms — ■ the delicate colour is admired by some — 
clean, disease- resistant plant. Mr. Whitlock (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) considers the 
colour is an improvement on any others in this class, although form is not good 
and blooms are small. 

ANVIL SPARKS (Ambossfunken), H.T. (E. Meyer S.A. '61) . Vivid yellow- 
orange-red stripes. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) finds this a very colour- 
ful decorative rose — fair bloomer — no disease and hardy. Mr. Morden ( 1 
pi.; 1 yr.; 17 in.) advises: showed no vigour in first year — had a few 
medium-sized blooms of an interesting colour — dark green foliage. Mrs. 
Packard (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 50 in.) notes: colour is variable, according to the 
weather, but a novelty worth having in spite of mildew (in a bad year). 

APRICOT NECTAR, Fl. (Boerner '66). Apricot blend. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 
1 yr.; 18 in.) comments: bears outstanding and beautiful blooms; queries: 
why do our catalogues not give us more indication of growth habits of bushes, 
so that we may plant them in correct location in beds? Mr. Buckley (20 pis.; 
1 yr. ; 30 in.) rates this a fine bedding rose, if one keeps faded flowers clipped 
— otherwise looks ragged. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) finds the flowers 



158 



of exhibition quality — a repeater — growth is spreading. Mr. Jubian ( 3 pis. ; 
1 yr.; 28 in.) mentions: this rose received more comments this year, in our 
garden than any other, it sure is a winner. Mr. Magee (2 pis.; 1 yr., 32 in.) 
notes : a variety with large flowers and large foliage — at best this fall when 
it was beautiful — fragrant. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 29 in.) writes: most 
disappointing in colour and amount of bloom — in my experience certainly 
not what it was advertised to be — prone to mildew. Mrs. Packard (1 pi.; 
1 yr.; 26 in.) says: variety is pretty at times, but has too few blooms, mostly 
one to a stem. 

ARABIAN NIGHTS, Fl. (McGredy '63). Orange-scarlet. Mr. Morden ( 1 pi. ; 
3 yrs.; 43 in.) reports: blooms of H.T.-type come in clusters on a vigorous 
bush — long-lasting and colour holds — a good repeater — 'an exceptionally 
good garden rose'. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) mentions the large 
blooms on a vigorous bush — free-flowering. 

ARPEGGIO, Fl. (Von Abrams int. P.&D. '61). Bright red with a yellow edge. 
Dr. Lea (3 pis.; 3 yrs.) notes: this is a compact, low-growing bush, which is 
very floriferous — flowers are single. 

ARTHUR BELL, Fl. (McGredy '65). Yellow. Mr. Bishop (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 40 
in. ) found this variety an attractive yellow — colour remains true throughout 
blooming — not prolific in first year — upright, sturdy bush. 'A must for 
every garden' says Mr. Frasier ( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 58 in. ) — has dark shining 
foliage — fragrant. Mr. Jubien (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) notes: colour similar to 
'Honeymoon', also growth habits — grew to 6 feet in the fall. Mr. Keenan 
( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 40 in. ) reports : proved worthwhile in first year — a vigorous 
grower well-clothed with excellent foliage — stood up in a dry summer — 
looks like a good addition to the floribundas; however it takes 3 years for a 
rose to really prove itself. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 54 in.) says: this is a 
vigorous grower — had abundance of bloom of clear yellow, but impossible 
for show purposes, opens far too fast. Mr. Whitlock (1 pi. ; 1 yr.; 40 in.) 
notes : a tall upright bush with bloom in small trusses — may be susceptible to 
blackspot. 

ASCOT, Fl. (Dickson '62). Salmon-pink. Mr. Jubien (6 pis.; 2 yrs.; 20 in.) 
reports : this variety has lots of bloom, but not always continuous — low- 
growing bush — increased my stock in '66 and it has never disappointed me. 

ASSINIBOINE, S. (H. H. Marshall '65). Red with yellow centre. The plants 
proved perfectly hardy, unprotected, and gave a satisfactory performance in 
their second year for the writer ( 3 pis. ; 2 yrs. ) . This is another rose developed 
to withstand cold prairie conditions, at Brandon Experimental Farm. Seems 
very suitable for the purpose. 

AUTUMN SPRAY, Fl. (Harkness '64) Yellow with red blend. Mrs. Hawkins 
(1 pi.; 1 yr.; 19 in.) writes: 'I don't care for flat, zinnia-type flower, another 
red-yellow blend — plant bushy, branching — fair bloomer — no disease. Miss 
Mason (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) notes : the yellow flowers quickly turn red — 
vigorous bush and rather attractive. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) com- 
ments : blooms are twice the size of 'Masquerade' — a very good producer in 
first year — clean foliage — no fragrance. 

AVON, H.T. (Morey int. J.&P. '61). Bright red. Mrs. Antoft (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 
30 in.) observes: blooms of this rose are average in form and colour — 
highly fragrant. Mr. Westbrook (4 pis.; 1, 4 yrs.; 30 in.) refers to exhibition 
form and good non-fading colour of the variety, with some fragrance — 
'there are a great many poorer reds'. Mr. Whitlock (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 40 in.) 
notes : well-shaped blooms grow on strong, healthy bush — very productive — 
quite similar to 'Chrysler Imperial'. (Last year (5) for reporting this rose.) 



159 



BABY DARLING, Min. (Moore int. Sequoia '64). Orange. Mrs. Morton (1 
pi.; 1 year; 10 in.) reports: this is a miniature of compact bushy growth — 
has blooms of H.T.-form which hold colour well — free-flowering. 

BAJAZZO, H.T. (Kordes '61). Red and white bicolour. Mrs. Antoft (6 pis.; 
1 yr.; 22 in.) points out: this is one of the largest roses in our gardens — 
bush of strong, upright growth — fragrant. Mr. De Kelver (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 
36 in.) reports: very generous bloomer, but flowers are loose when full — 
nice buds — some fragrance. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 42 in. ) writes : an 
upright plant — blooms open fast, colour holds — repeats — no disease. Mr. 
Meier (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 34 in.) comments: a moderate bloomer, but has few 
striking blooms — slightly fragrant — disease resistant. Mr. Parker ( 3 pis. ; 5 
yrs.; 36 in.) emphasizes the vivid colouring, and striking contrast of crimson 
and silver, gaudy — 'some people rave over it, others don't like it' — large 
plants — fairly productive. (Last year (5) for reporting this rose.) 

BAMBI, Fl. (Von Abrams '62). Apricot-pink. In the opinion of Mrs. 
Packard ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) this is a darling in soft salmon and translucent 
pink — very nice bush — heavy spring bloomer and all through year. 

PEAULIEU ABBEY, Fl. (Cobley '64). Cream yellow with salmon and red 
shading. Mr. Morin (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) reports this variety did not produce 
too many blooms in first year — the large flowers are very showy — growth 
is upright, nice foliage — no fragrance. 

BEAUTY SECRET, Min. (Moore int. Sequoia '65). Medium red. Mrs. 
Morton (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ) observes : this miniature bears shapely blooms of H.T.- 
form that hold colour well — free-flowering — fragrant. 

BEL ANGE, H.T. (Lens '64). Rose-pink. This rose gave a better perform- 
ance this year for Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 24 in. ) — not a heavy bloomer, 
but flowers are large and good colour — watch for blackspot. 

BELLE EPOCHE (Belle Epoque), H.T. (Lens '63). Light pink. Mr. 
Frasier (1 pi ; 2 yrs. ; 50 in. ) comments : 'a nice rose' — growth is upright — 
blooms are exhibition quality and long-lasting — no disease. Mr. McDougall 
( 1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ) also considers blooms are show quality — foliage good, disease- 
free and very hardy — will increase. 

BELLET ETOILE, H.T. (Lens '62). Yellow. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 
24 in. reports : did not perform as well this year — medium-sized blooms are 
of good form and colour — slow to repeat — some blackspot. 

BEWITCHED, H.T. (Germain's '67). Phlox-pink. Mrs. Packard (3 pis.; 1 
yr.; 45 in.) states: this new variety was by far the best All America winner 
for me this year — lovely in form and texture — attractive healthy foliage 
in a bad season — 'should be a very popular pink'. 

BLAKENEY'S RED, H.T. (Blakeney '63). This variety can be used for 
exhibition purposes in a pinch, writes Mr. Selwood (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) — 
an average bloomer — plant bushy and healthy — fragrant. Mr. Westbrook 
(3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 24 in.) however comments: has lots of healthy foliage but few 
blooms — 'would not repeat it'. 

BLUE BOX, S. (Kordes int. Hennessey '62). Reddish-violet. Mr. Parker 
(3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 60 in.) comments: blooms come on previous year's wood, 
tremendous amount of bloom for months, then no more — colour bluish- 
purple, interesting to see what hybridizers will do with it! — mildews badly. 

BLUE DIAMOND, Fl. (Lens '63). Rich violet to purplish-maroon. Mrs. 
Antoft (5 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) states: this was sold to us as a H.T. — blooms 

160 



are full and of perfect shape — growth strong. Mr. Magee (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 32 
in.) comments: buds are beautiful — flowers fade in the sun, variety hates 
rain — free-blooming. 

BLUE MOON, H.T. (Tantau '64). Light mauve. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
45 in.) reports: a good performer this year — growth strong — bloom of 
exhibition form, repeats — no disease. Mr. Magee (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 32 in.) 
writes : tough to beat on the show table in mauve or lavender class — colour 
pale but acceptable, bloom well-shaped — foliage rather poor. Mr. Morden 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 22 in. ) observes : bush produced 3 blooms in the spring, nothing 
afterwards — large flowers are fragrant and of exhibition form, colour is 
good — hope for better performance next year. 

BOB HOPE, Fl. (Kordes int. J.&P. '66). Deep red. Mr. Frasier (3 pis.; 2 
yrs. ; 66 in. ) reports : this is a tall, upright bush — bears lots of dark florescent- 
red bloom — no disease — hardy. Mrs. Packard (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 36 in. ) notes : 
variety has fairly good form — growth is upright. 

BOND STREET, H.T. (McGredy '65). Salmon-pink. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 1 
yr.; 40 in.) writes: this is an upright plant, with blooms more attractive in 
bud than when opened — a useful bedding variety. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 
26 in.) had good results from this new rose in first year — no trouble — no 
disease — very fragrant. Mr. White (1 pi.; 1 yr.) hopes his bush proves 
hardy as it is a beautiful rose — a low-growing plant — fairly free-flowering. 

BONNIE PINK, Fl. (J.&P. '64). Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 24 in.) notes: 
this is a variety of low, spreading growth — blooms are H.T.-shape, long- 
lasting — no disease — hardy. 

BOSSA NOVA, H.T. (McGredy '64). Deep golden yellow. Mr. Bishop (3 
pis. ; 1 yr. ; 40 in. ) reports : an attractive yellow — vigorous bush but foliage 
not attractive — prone to disease. Mr. Goulding (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) was 
disappointed with results in second year — plant habit is poor, tall-growing 
with thin stems — blooms sparse — 'King's Ransom' is a much superior 
yellow. 

BRANDENBURG, H.T. (Kordes '65). Two-toned red. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 

1 yr. ; 40 in. ) observes : this is a tall, upright bush with good foliage — has 
plenty of large blooms of exhibition quality. Mr. Collier ( 1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 
in. ) notes : a very straight-growing, upright plant — blooms of excellent form 

— healthy. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) found it a reasonably free- 
bloomer in the first year — exhibition form — will report further. Mr. Magee 
(2 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) notes: flowers are well-formed, but open far too 
rapidly for show use. Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 23 in.) advises: variety is 
slow to repeat, although blooms are of good form and colour — not too 
vigorous in first year. 

CAMELOT, Gr. (Swim & Weeks int. C.&P. '65). Between deep yellowish- 
pink and vivid red. Mr. Bishop (4 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) reports this variety 
was somewhat disappointing in quantity and quality of bloom in second year 

— location may be contributing factor. Mr. Buckley (25 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) 
advises: plants were larger in second year, showed up much better, but 
average number of well-formed flowers was low. For Mr. Collier (1 pi.; 

2 yrs ; ; 36 in.) also, the variety bloomed in abundance this year, after poor 
showing in the first — very showy growth — 'this rose does not impress me'. 
Mr. De Kelver (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) notes: flowers are long-lasting, with 
large heads — good growth, upright and healthy. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 
36 in.) mentions the exhibition- type blooms on an upright bush — no disease. 
Mrs. Gallagher (3 pis.; 2 yrs.) observes: variety had too few blooms on 
mediocre plants in this extraordinary year. This is a welcome addition to 



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the grandiflora family says Mr. Goulding (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 40 in. ) — strong- 
growing bush — bloom excellent. Mrs. Guadagni (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 60 in.) com- 
ments : 'consider it one of the loveliest roses in my garden' — growth was 
excellent — blooms of exhibition quality, hold colour throughout. Dr Lea 
(2 pis.; 2 yrs.) says: top performer both years, particularly good in autumn 

— bush sturdy and disease-resistant. Mr. Magee ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) writes : would 
be just another variety, except for large heads produced late in summer that 
were very beautiful — a lovely colour. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) 
advises: had much more bloom this year and very attractive colour — an 
excellent addition. Mrs. Morrison (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 25 in.) notes: much im- 
proved in second year — blooms are an unusual silky, silvery orange-to-coral, 
very attractive — a good new rose. However, Dr. Moyle (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) com- 
plains it was very poor this season; and Mrs. Packard (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) 
states likewise. Mr. Patterson (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) observes: blooms are usually 
in clusters — but a little stingy in number — seems strong and hardy — 'I 
like it'. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 44 in. ) points out that colour varies with 
the season — 'does better for others than for me'. 

CANADIAN CENTENNIAL, Fl. (J.&P. '66). Coral-salmon. Mrs. Antoft (10 
pis.; 1 yr.; 22 in.) reports: variety bears tight, very double blooms on a 
vigorous, many-branched bush — very susceptible to blackspot — plants re- 
ceived had disadvantage of 6-8 inch shank from roots to graft, which calls for 
very deep planting hole. Mrs. Gallagher (1 pi.; 1 yr.) says: have small 
enthusiasm for this rose — its young buds have a rather attractive orange- 
pink colour, which soon fades into a dusty pink — slow to repeat. Mr. 
Jubien (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 20 in.) points out that grown by itself (i.e. one bush) the 
variety is very ordinary, but planted in mass it looks very good, and keeps 
its bloom well — very widely grown in Montreal area this summer — shall 
not increase my stock. Mr. Mayer (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) comments: growth 
is low and spreading — blooms tend to fade fairly quickly — in my opinion 
just another floribunda, and not particularly outstanding which is unfortunate, 
in view of all the bally-hoo it has been given and the trouble it has caused. 
Mr. Miller (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) states: this rose is away behind 'Miss 
Canada' in my garden, on all counts — growth not too good — all in all the 
best thing about this rose is that net proceeds went to help retarded children 

— 'I prefer 'Spartan' or 'Fashion'. The writer (3 pis.; 1 yr.) was impressed 
by the continuous display of colour on the bushes throughout the season. 

CANDY STRIPE, H.T. (C.&P. '63). Pink blend. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 
55 in. ) notes : a tall upright bush — a delightful exhibition-type rose, large 
blooms hold well — fragrant — very hardy. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) 
comments : one of the best variegated varieties, but not too much contrast in 
the colour — bush grew well this year. Dr. Moyle ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) states : 
vigorous healthy bush, had a few wonderful blooms. 

CASANOVA, H.T. (McGredy '64). Medium yellow. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 
1 yr. ) writes : this is a strong upright plant — disease-resistant — blooms an 
attractive creamy shade of yellow — rather sparse in first year — nicely shaped 
in the bud. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 42 in.) notes: blooms are exhibition- 
type — foliage excellent — 'a real nice yellow'. Mr. White (1 pi.; 1 yr.) 
agrees, and says 'am very pleased'. 

CASINO, L.C. (McGredy '63). Soft yellow. Mrs. Antoft (10 pis.; 2 yrs.) 
comments: in 2 years this climber grew into a very large bush, with large 
soft yellow flowers of beautiful H.T.-form — truly ever-blooming and fragrant. 
Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 72 in.) also reports a favourable opinion — bears 
lovely H.T.-shaped buds — seems hardy. 

CELEBRATION, Fl. (Dickson '61). Light salmon with ivory base. Mrs. 
Baillie (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 28 in.) reports: plant has improved with age — bloomed 



162 



fairly steadily all season, I find the colour in fall very pleasing — healthy 
foliage — some blackspot. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) comments: this 
is a very showy bush — pointed buds are long-lasting — a good repeater — 
clean foliage — no fragrance. 

CHAMPAGNE, H.T. (Lindquist int. Howard '61). Buff with apricot 
shading. Dr. Lea (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) observes: second year performance of this 
variety was very disappointing — few blooms and little new growth. Mr. 
Magee (1 pi. ; 4 yrs. ; 60 in. ) says : a good rose — has exhibition blooms but 
is not too free-blooming. Mrs. Morton (2 pis.; 4 yrs.; 60 in.) also found it 
not too productive — bloom balls badly in wet weather, although of exhibition 
form. Mr. Westbrook (1 pi.; 5 yrs.) relates: in my experience, this plant has 
deteriorated each year — this spring it was laid to rest — R.I. P. 

CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH, Fl. (Norman int. Harkness '65) . Rose-pink. Mr. 
Collier (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 20 in.) reports: blooms open quite rapidly — has 
attractive foliage and appears healthy. Mrs. Gallagher (4 pis.; 2 yrs.) notes: 
the lovely small buds of deep pink open into blooms of a much lighter shade, 
on a good medium-size bush, with nice bronzy foliage. Mr. Patterson, 2 pis. ; 

1 yr.; 30 in.) was satisfied with first year's growth — flowers soon open, not 
many petals. 

CHERRY BRANDY, H.T. (Tantau '65). Light orange-red. Mr. Morden 
(1 pi.; 1 yr.; 12 in.) writes: variety gave a poor performance in its first 
year — the few medium-sized blooms produced were of good form and colour 
— bush lacked vigour and had tendency to sprawl. Mrs. Packard (1 pi. ; 2 
yr. 20 in.) considers this a rare beauty, though not very vigorous — a new 
and desirable colour — exquisite buds. 

CHICAGO PEACE, H.T. (Johnston C.&P. '62). Pink with yellow reverse. 
Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 48 in.) enthuses: continues to be a winner with 
enormous blooms — bushes sturdy and disease-free — however, one friend 
asked facetiously 'why grow cabbages on a rose bush?' Mr. Collier (1 pi.; 

2 yrs.; 36 in.) states: was not nearly so prolific this year, though growth was 
strong and healthy — has most attractive bloom of exceptional size. Mr. De 
Kelver (3 pis.; 2, 3 yrs.; 40 in.) comments: buds and blooms are beautiful, 
large, and lots of them. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 4 yrs.; 36 in.) also mentions the 
exhibition calibre of the blooms, of immense size and beautiful colour. Mr. 
Goulding ( 2 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 36 in. ) observes : 'an outstanding rose' — vigorous 
growth — prolific bloomer. Mr. Grindle (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) thinks it is 
more colourful than 'Peace' — very healthy plant. Dr. Lea (2 pis.; 2 yrs.) 
confesses: all my efforts to grow this rose have been unsuccessful, neither 
bush has done well. Mr. McDougall (2 pis.; 2 yrs.) says: blooms are show 
quality — foliage good — disease-free — hardy. Mr. McNally (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 
24 in. ) observes : bush showed up better in the fall — the few blooms were 
large and foliage was nice — expect improvement next year. Mr. Miller (3 
pis. ; 3 yrs. ; 24 in. ) points out that all plants wintered well — good bloomers. 
Mrs. Morrison (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 38 in.) rates this a good rose in every respect, 
with excellent healthy foliage. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) writes: 
vigorous healthy bush, with blooms of excellent quality. For Mr. Patterson 
(1 pi.; 4 yrs.; 36 in.) variety was a rather stingy bloomer — one shoot this 
year bore 'Peace', other 'Chicago Peace' blooms. Mr. Perrault (2 pis.; 1, 2 
yrs. ; 30 in. ) found the flowers very good for cutting — production fair — 
vigorous — will repeat. Mr. Selwood (2 pis.; 3, 4 yrs.) writes: its plant habits 
are better than 'Peace' — an interesting rose, one never quite knows what 
pink, yellow, orange or copper shades will be forthcoming. Mr. Sparling (2 
pis.; 4 yrs.; 40 in.) says: showed excellent vigorous growth this year, with 
generous blooms of tremendous size, some of exhibition quality. Mr. West- 
brook (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) had no complaints — am looking for great things 
next year. Mr. Whitfield (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) reports: grown on multiflora it 



163 



had many blooms, but these were poor exhibition quality — some reversion to 
'Peace' colouring in August. Mr. Whitlock (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 40 in.) however 
considers bloom certainly of show quality, especially in late fall. 

CHINATOWN, S. (Poulsen '63). Yellow with cherry edge. Mrs. Antoft 
(12 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) comments: growth of this variety was much better 
in second year, with free flower production of 4 inch double bloom — good 
fragrance — tall and very vigorous. Mr. Goulding (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 40 in. ) had a 
disappointing first year's experience with this variety, too much plant growth 
and too few blooms. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 58 in.) notes: it is far too 
tall and has very few blooms in fall — flowers have good form. Mr. Parker 
(3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 60 in.) reports: some canes very tall, but plant is bushy, and 
large blooms are freely produced — very fragrant. Mr. Spencer (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 
48 in.) points out 'always some bloom on this bush'. Mr. Westbrook (3 pis.; 
1, 3 yrs.; 84 in.) writes: this one I can recommend, takes a year to get its 
feet down, but then look out! The writer (1 pi. ; 1 yr.) received a miserable, 
anemic-looking bush from England, which made no growth whatever — doubt 
it will survive winter. 

CLAIR MATIN, CI. or S. (Meilland '60). Pink. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
48 in.) reports; made quite a show in July for a new climber — blooms in 
trusses, but not long-lasting — clean foliage — well pleased with it. (Last year 
for reporting this rose. ) 

COLOGNE CARNIVAL (Kolner Karnival), H.T. (Kordes int. Wheatcroft 
'64). Silver blend. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) comments: variety was 
not too vigorous in first year — blooms are much cleaner lavender than 
'Sterling Silver' and other lavenders, and colour is much better saturated — 
am looking forward to seeing this next year, if winter spares it. Mr. Frasier 
(2 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) also considers this 'a real good lavender' — nice buds 
and attractive blooms. Mr. Jenkins (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) notes : blooms have 
good form and colour — foliage good — disease-resistant. 

COLOUR WONDER (Konigen der Rosen), H.T. (Kordes '64). Salmon- 
opal. Mrs. Antoft (8 pis.; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) observes: this rose bears very un- 
usual blooms of striking colour which is hard to describe, as hardly two flowers 
are exactly alike — the glowing colour attracted much attention — fragrant. 
Mr. Bishop ( 3 pis. ; 1 yrs. ; 24 in. ) reports : was slow starter in first year, but 
produced some exquisite blooms, with nicely-shaped clean foliage. Mr. Collier 
(2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 10 in.) notes: plants were late arriving (due to longshoremen's 
strike) — open blooms last exceptionally well. In the opinion of Mr. De 
Kelver (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) this is a 'real eye-catcher' — lots of bloom of 
good form — fragrant — light green foliage. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 36 
in. ) refers to the nice blooms which hold their colour, which is very attractive. 
Mr. Goulding (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) agrees: blooms are beautifully-formed, 
of a most unusual colour — very neat bush — put on a fine display in the fall. 
Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 28 in.) cautions: while colour is striking, double 
centres are frequent and growth of bush is not too strong — but 'verdict is 
still out.' Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 16 in.) advises: plants gave a poor 
performance for this year — slow to repeat — small blooms are of good form 
and colour. Mr. Parker (3 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 36 in.) comments: strong bush — 
blooms very double on firm stems, last longer than any other H.T. when out 
— hard to handle, stems covered with stubby sharp thorns. Mr. Selwood ( 1 
pi.; 1 yr.) found this rose about what could be expected from its parents 
'Super Star' and 'Perfecta' — seems to have many admirers — fragrant. Mr. 
Whitlock (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) notes: 4 inch blooms are produced on strong 
stems, in moderate quantity — 'an exciting bicolour'. 

COLUMBUS QUEEN, H.T. (Swim, Armstrong '62). Light pink, darker pink 
reverse. Mr. Jenkins (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) notes: this is a deep rich pink — 



164 



bloom of exhibition form, good substance — healthy bush. Mrs. Packard 
(1 pi.; 2 yrs. ; 50 in.) reports: this is a great prize-winner at our coastal 
shows, when grown in warmer sections — has fine form and texture of bloom. 
Mr. Selwood (1 pi.; 4 yrs.; 42 in.) comments: the long tulipy buds open to 
urn-shaped flowers — 'no longer excites me'. 

CORONADO, H.T. (Von Abrams P.&D. '60). Red and yellow bicolour. Mrs. 
An toft (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) states: blooms are large and well-formed — 
bush is vigorous grower — fragrant. (Last year for reporting this rose.) 

CRIMSON HALO, H.T. (Int. Harkness '65). Light crimson. Mr. Jenkins 
(2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) notes: this is a plant that stands up in wet weather 
well — flowers are attractive and bright — not as large as some reds. Mr. 
Laffey (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 28 in.) found that the fair number of blooms on this 
rose open up too quickly, on rather weak stems — 'not a very good red and 
would like to wait a year'. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 18 in.) comments: a 
spreading bush — stood the heat well — blooms long-lasting, fair producer 
— • very striking red — no fragrance. 

DAILY SKETCH, Fl. (McGredy '61). Deep pink and silver. Mrs. Antoft 
(10 pils. ; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) says: almost as popular as 'Kordes Perfecta' which 
it resembles, although it turns a dark plum-red colour with age — very free- 
flowering — vigorous — fragrant. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) notes : the 
long-lasting flowers take on different shades as they age, but are still pretty 

— slow repeater. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 2 yrs ; 34 in. ) mentions : a spreading 
type, very vigorous — H.T.-shape blooms are long-lasting. Mr. Goulding (2 
pis; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) comments: blooms of H.T.-type are lovely and most inter- 
esting in the early stages, but not so attractive when fully open. Mrs. 
Hawkins (1 pi.; 4 yrs.; 34 in.) observes; does most of its blooming early in 
the season — flowers come singly and in clusters — appear scorched in hot 
weather — a favourite. 'Still one of my best floribundas' writes Mr. Keenan 
( 2 pis. ; 4, 5 yrs. ) — ■ proved winter hardy and a strong grower. Mr. Meier 
(3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) also rates this variety as outstanding — resembles 
'Perfecta' — fragrant — upright bush, disease free. Mr. Morden (4 pis.; 1, 
3 yrs.; 32 in.) suggests this is a good rose for bedding and arranging. Dr. 
Moyle (1 pi. ; 4 yrs. ; 48 in. ) states : had one good cycle of bloom in July. Mr. 
Parker (3 pis.; 5 yrs.; 36 in.) reports: a bushy plant with strong canes — 
very large flowers — very fragrant. Mr. White (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) considers this 
a very attractive rose — free-flowering — hardy. (Last year (5) for reporting 
this rose. ) 

DIAMANT (Diamond), Fl. (Kordes '62). Orange-red. Mrs. Baillie (1 pi.; 
2 yrs. ; 30 in. ) reports : the large petalled blooms hold colour particularly well 

— seems to be in flower most of the time — extremely healthy — 'I like it 
very much'. Mr. MacPherson (3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) writes: the best of the 
orange-reds — blooms are outstanding colour, in trusses, of good form — plants 
are small but hope for improvement when established. Miss Mason (1 pi. ; 2 
yrs. 35 in. ) agrees the colour is very attractive — blooms have good form — 
'hope it will bloom more freely next year'. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 20 in.) 
notes : bush not so vigorous this year — June bloom was good, very little 
growth afterwards. Mr. Parker (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) considers this a very 
pleasing fully double, bright orange-red — blooms not too crowded on trusses. 
Mr. Selwood (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 40 in.) says: this H.T.-type floribunda had some 
blooms all season — best in June. Mr. Spencer (2 pis.; 3 yrs.) observes: bushes 
were winter-damaged, lost one during summer, other made new growth from 
base early this fall — apparently not hardy. Mr. Westbrook (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 
30 in. ) writes : seems a good floribunda if I could get it to grow — lost one 
of the two I had last year and the replacement was dead on arrival: is there 
a weakness here? Mr. Whitlock (1 pi. ; 4 yrs.; 30 in.) comments: this is the 



165 



first year this rose has done anything — has had to take a back seat to 'Scarlet 
Queen Elizabeth' and 'Queen Elizabeth' beside it. 

DIORAMA, H.T. (de Ruiter '65). Apricot-yellow flushed pink. Mrs. 
Hawkins (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) considers this a lovely exhibition rose — blooms 
of good substance — on first year plant there were only 3 blooms, last being 
the best. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 18 in.) reports: the medium-size blooms 
are of good form — colour holds well — slow to repeat — bush not too vigor- 
ous in first year. 

DOROTHY WHEATCROFT, Fl. (Wheatcroft '61). Orange-red. Mr. Magee 
(1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 48 in. ) writes : this is a free-blooming variety — flowers are very 
showy — large plants. 

DIXIE BELLE, H.T. (Boerner int. J.&P. '63). Mr. Buckley (20 pis.; 2 yrs.; 
30 in. ) reports : a bed of these roses was delightful all summer — the well- 
formed flowers are light pink with deeper pink at centre. 

DR. A. J. VERHAGE, H.T. (Verbeck '60). Deep yellow. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 
2 yrs.; 30 in.) considers the blooms of this variety are exhibition quality — 
have delightful fragrance — a slow repeater. Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 38 
in. ) agrees and notes the colour holds well — dark green foliage tends to 
blackspot — an upright plant. (Last year for reporting this rose.) 

DR. BROWNELL, H.T. (Brownell '65). Peach and yellow. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 
1 yr. ) comments : colour of bloom is not striking, flowers do not last, but the 
foliage is shiny, just like a mirror and stays that way, no foliage like it 
except perhaps 'Piccadilly' — very spreading bush — slight fragrance. 

EIFFEL TOWER, H.T. (Swim '63). Medium pink. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 2 
yrs. ; 60 in. ) writes : a giant, but well-proportioned bush, clean and healthy — 
attractive blooms which hold well, although many do not open fully. Mrs. 
Gallagher (3 pis.; 2 yrs.) notes: very tall bush, slender stems, foliage of light 
lemon-green is not attractive — not impressed with performance this year. 
Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 72 in.) observes: buds and blooms of exhibition 
type, open nicely on long stems — very hardy. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
52 in.) comments: a tall-growing variety — buds are a delight, full blooms 
not quite so good — will report next year. 'The most spectacular plants in 
my garden' says Mr. Laff ey ( 2 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 72 in. ) — bloom continuously. Dr. 
Lea (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) reports: the few blooms produced to date have been 
excellent, but much too few — bush ungainly and did little after mid-season. 
Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 72 in.) states: good variety with long buds that last 
well, despite few petals — little disease. Miss Mason (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 58 in. ) 
mentions the huge well-formed buds which take long to open, sometimes 
damaged by weather during that interval. On the other hand, the long pointed 
buds open too fast for Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) says he will 
discard when he needs space. Mrs. Smith (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) was disappointed 
with the variety — beautiful only in the bud — blooms plentiful and fragrant 
but opened up flat. Mr. Westbrook (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 60 in.) says: 'I like this 
one, shall repeat' — both buds and blooms are excellent. 

ELIZABETH OF GLAMIS, Fl. (McGredy '64). Salmon-pink. Mrs. Antoft 
(20 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 20 in.) writes: this is a glamourised 'Fashion', which it 
resembles both in growth and flower — showed quite an improvement in 
second year. Mr. Bishop (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 20 in.) was disappointed in first year 
performance — very little bloom and bush slow in developing — doubtful if 
bushes are hardy enough to survive winter. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 18 
in.) reports: this rose is not too free-flowering — plants are still not too strong 
— few flowers produced were of excellent form. Mr. Collier (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 
10 in.) was not impressed: plant received seems to be a dwarf, only pro- 



166 



ducing 4 blooms. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 40 in.) notes: a tall, spreading 
bush — abundant blooms of salmon colour — nice fragrance. For Mr. 
Keenan (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 34 in.) this variety wintered well — performance even 
better than first year — blooms in good clusters and very fragrant — 
'recommend this variety'. Dr. Lea (1 pi.; 1 yr.) feels this rose shows promise 

— made very slow start but blooms were bright and attractive. Mr. Magee 
(2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 24 in.) found its performance ordinary, except for first crop 
in the spring which were truly beautiful. In the opinion of Miss Mason (1 pi. ; 
1 yr. ; 38 in. ) this is one of the best new floribundas — abundant bloom, very 
showy and fragrant. Mr. Meier (5 pis.; 1 yr.; 38 in.) enthuses: bloomed 
abundantly from early June — pleasing colour, H.T. buds — 'my favourite'. 
Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 14 in.) states: big disappointment in second year 

— few small blooms of good form — bush lacks vigour — will probably dis- 
card. This rose gave a much better performance for Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 2 
yrs. ; 28 in. ) in second year — well-formed blooms hold colour and are fragrant. 
Dr. Moyle (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 20 in.) advises: had several small well-shaped flowers 

— will keep. Mrs. Packard (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) advises: not happy for me, 
not a good bloom all season. An excellent variety, according to Mr. Parker 
(3 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) — continuous bloom of H.T.-type — am pleased and 
have seen plants doing even better in other gardens. Mr. Patterson ( lpl.; 

1 yr. ; 30 in. ) agrees : 'this will be a favourite I am sure'. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 

2 yrs.; 30 in.) mentions: flowers in clusters are H.T.-type, of excellent form 

— prolific bloomer — fragrant. 

ELYSIUM, Fl. (Kordes '61). Light yellowish-salmon. Mrs. Antoft (15 pis.; 
2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) reports : variety showed a taller bushier growth in second year 

— blooms in abundance — fragrant. Mr. Buckley ( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) notes : 
colour is a pure pink — beautiful flowers in bud and when open. Mrs. Hawkins 
(1 pi. ; 4 yrs. ; 38 in. ) comments : an excellent free-blooming plant — repeats 
— lovely in opening bud, does better than 'Vera Dalton' and 'Fashion' for me. 

EMINENCE, H.T. (Gaujard '63). Rose-lavender. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 
40 in.) comments: bloom of this variety holds colour well, does not fade — 
has exhibition form. 

ERNEST H. MORSE, H.T. (Kordes '64). Rich turkey-red. Mr. Collier (1 pi. 
1 yr. ; 16 in. ) states : variety had only 3 blooms this season, each of which was 
perfect — have hopes for next year. 

EUROPEANA, Fl. (de Ruiter '63>. Blood red. Mrs. Antoft (6 pis.; 1 yr.; 27 
in.) reports: this is a very bushy plant with large trusses of dark red bloom, 
which always attracts attention. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 42 in.) notes: 
flowers are borne in large trusses on wide-spreading bushes — very floriferous 

— deeper in colour than 'Lilli Marlene' and 'Marlena'. Dr. Lea (2 pis.; 1, 2 
yrs. ) writes : this appears to be the best of the new red floribundas — flowers 
very bright, very double and long-lasting. Mr. Magee (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) finds this 
plant a showy grower with large flower heads and attractive foliage — prefers 
'Lilli Marlene' in spring, but this was fine in fall. Mrs. Morton (2 pis.; 2, 3 
yrs.; 26 in.) comments: exceptionally free-flowering and long-lasting — good 
colour and stability. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) mentions bush produces large 
trusses of glowing crimson flowers in abundance. 

EVE ALLEN, H.T. (Allen '63). Rose-red with buffish reverse. Mr. Magee 
(1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) comments: this is a fairly good bicolour, that is free- 
blooming — bud not quite long enough for best exhibition form — beautiful 
this autumn — blackspots. 

EVELYN FISON, Fl. (McGredy '62). Crimson. Mr. Collier (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
20 in.) considers this 'the best floribunda in my garden' — bears an abundance 
of long-lasting blooms which do not fade or burn in the sun. Mrs. Gallagher 



167 



(2 pis.; 1. 2 yrs.) writes: a vivid and excellent floribunda in colour and per- 
formance — always in bloom. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 3, 4 yrs.; 32 in.) comments: 
a good every-day floribunda — no troubles — 'should be with us for a long 
time'. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 33 in.) reports: a good rose this year — 
medium size blooms are borne in clusters, long-lasting. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 
1 yr. ; 26 in.) mentions that colour never fades — free-flowering — disease- 
resistant. Mrs. Packard (1 p..; 3 yrs.; 50 in.) notes: was slow in first year, but 
is now glorious — flowers last so long and such a fiery colour. Mr. Parker 
(3 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) states: 'I agree with comments of last year's C.H. — 
one of the best floribundas'. Mr. Selwood (2 pis.; 3, 4 yrs.) also confirms his 
own opinion, 'this is one of the best reds, and also one of the best in any 
colour'. Mr. Sparling (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 20 in.) observes: had fair amount of bloom 
in first year — healthy foliage — 'good red'. 

EVENSONG, H.T. (Arnot '63). Salmon-pink. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 28 
in. ) ^ reports : variety showed vigorous growth and was disease-free — not a 
prolific bloomer, however blooms were excellent. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 
24 in.)^ comments: produced large blooms which opened too fast, not good for 
exhibition — slow to repeat — will probably discard after another year. Mrs. 
Packard (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) observes: was grown in too much shade, so had 
not enough bloom, but a gay pink of the type of 'Opera' — this one looks 
interesting. 

FEE, Fl. (Kordes '63). Deep salmon. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) notes: 
a very floriferous variety, with well-formed buds. 

FEMINA, H.T. (Gaujard '63). Pink blend. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 32 in.) 
reports : this is a bush of spreading type — blooms are show quality — mildews. 
Mr. Laffey (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) writes: may be a really good one — beauti- 
fully well-shaped blooms, but not too many in first year — healthy. Mr. Magee 
(2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) considers this a fairly good variety — flowers well- 
formed — bushy plant tends to mildew. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) 
notes : large blooms are good form and colour — slow to repeat — 'if it were 
not for colour I would not be impressed.' Mrs. Packard ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 20 in.) 
agrees: not a strong plant, although a lovely colour — 'only for the experts'. 

FINALE, Fl. (Kordes int. Dickson '64). Salmon-red. Mr. Bishop (2 pis.; 
1 yr. ; 20 in.) reports: this is a low, compact plant, with attractive small 
bloom.'} — a good bedding variety. Mr. Jubien (6 pis.; 2 yrs.; 20 in.) writes: 
'I give this rose very high marks for its habit of growth, flower production, 
colour and freedom from any defects — have added more stock'. 

FIRST FEDERAL, H.T. (Boerner '63). Orange-pink. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
36 in.) comments: this variety is close to 'Montezuma' in colour, but not as 
orange — free bloomer and a good garden variety. 

FLAMENCO, Fl. (McGredy '61). Deep salmon. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 
32 in.) notes: very bushy plant, covered with bloom all summer, which was 
long-lasting and non-fading. Mr. Goulding (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 24 in.) reports: 
greatly improved in second year — medium-sized blooms are of good colour. 
Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 29 in.) comments: flowers of medium size grow 
in clusters on an upright bush — 'a good garden rose'. 

FLORIADE, Gr. (Teunis van der Schilden int. Armstrong '63). Light carmine- 
red. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 48 in.) reports: a sturdy, disease-free bush — 
blooms are almost H.T.-type — 'a useful addition to the grandiflora family'. 
Mr. Frasier ( 1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 50 in. ) comments : very tall — nice foliage — colour 
like 'Tropicana' — 'a good rose'. Mrs. Guadagni (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 60 in.) notes: 
very few blooms this year, seemed slow to establish — disappointing — colour 
would be good addition to grandiflora group if it measured up in other ways. 
Dr. Lea (1 pi.; 1 yr.) found the variety quite generous with flowers, which 



168 



were very bright — healthy low-growing bush — much like Tropicana'. Mrs. 
Packard (1 pi. ; 4 yrs. ; 60 in. ) observes : continues to be excellent — far 
superior here to 'Montezuma'. 

FLOWER GIRL, Fl. (Dickson '64). Salmon-cream. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 
36 in.) considers this a very beautiful variety — 'one of the best of all'. Mr. 
Morden (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 28 in.) agrees: small H.T.-blooms are of good form and 
colour, borne singly — good repeater — long-lasting — 'a good garden rose'. 

FRAGRANT CLOUD (Duftwolke), H.T. (Tantau'63). Geranium-lake. Mrs. 
An toft (8 pis.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) writes: a very beautiful rose with outstanding 
fragrance — lots of large flowers — attracts much attention. Mrs. Baillie (1 pi.; 
1 yr. ; 30 in. ) reports : performed excellently for first year — prolific, good 
quality blooms — fragrant — 'very worth while'. No wonder this variety scored 
so heavily in the ratings, says Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.), it is tops in 
every respect — 'and such heavenly fragrance'. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 
in. ) concurs : one of the most outstanding roses in the test garden — this rose 
gave me the greatest thrill of any, except 'Kronenbourg' — delightful fragrance. 
Mr. Collier (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 18 in.) observes: a good garden rose, not suitable 
for exhibition — blooms open rather quickly — some mildew. Mr. De Kelver 
(3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 26 in.) notes: has excellent bloom, long-lasting, non-fading — a 
dandy rose. 'The most beautiful rose in our garden' enthuses Mr. Frasier (4 
pis.; 2 yrs.; 39 in.), very free-blooming — low, spreading, compact. Mrs. 
Hawkins (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 30 in. ) rates this a top rose in every way — while colour 
and form are most attractive, the fragrance is its greatest attribute — 'a rose 
to savor in summer and remember in winter'. Mr. Keenan (4 pis.; 2, 3 yrs.; 
30 in.) points out: this is one of the first to bloom, made an excellent showing 
late in June in a slow-growing spring — foliage is diseases-free. Mr. Laff ey 
(4 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 36 in.) enthuses : 'in my money, this is the greatest of all modern 
roses' — beautiful large blooms all the time, from June to November — excep- 
tional fragrance. Mr. Magee (2 pis.; 1, 4 yrs. ; 36 in.) finds it still a show 
variety, and only defect is it blooms in bursts and opens quite rapidly. Miss 
Mason (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 53 in.) agrees the attractive blooms are good for exhibi- 
tion purposes — good healthy foliage — 'recommend this variety'. Mrs. Mac- 
Donald (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) thinks this rose is well-named. Mr. Morden 
(2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 21 in.) is restrained: not too vigorous in first year — blooms 
open rather fast. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 24 in.) notes: flowers are of 
perfect exhibition form (Best rose in V.R.S. Show — A. Selwood). Dr. Moyle 
(1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 42 in.) mentions: rose is almost same colour as 'Super Star' but 
a better bloomer and more fragrant. Mrs. Packard (3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 36 in) also 
thinks colour more red than 'Super Star', one 6-inch bloom in October was 
true vermilion. Mr. Parker (3 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) deals in superlatives: 'the 
best variety I have ever grown'. Mr. Patterson (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) also 
compares blooms with 'Super Star', but thinks they have more substance. Mr. 
Selwood (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) sums it up: this rose has everything, including 
exhibition form — 'move over, 'Super Star'.' Mr. Sparling (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) 
reports fair growth from his plant in first year. Mr. Westbrook (6 pis. ; 1, 2 yrs.; 
40 in. ) observes : a 'must' as a garden rose. Mr. White ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) says 
a beautiful rose, with first-rate flowers. Mr. Whitlock (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) 
notes: after a slow start in first year, was excellent this year — a high- 
centred, exhibition- type rose. 

GARDEN STATE, Gr. (Meilland int. C.&P. '65). Rose-pink. Mr. Bishop 
(3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 40 in.) comments: variety of upright growth, with attractive 
blooms — useful background in beds. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 72 in.) also 
suggests : a tall bush for the background — bloom exhibition quality — very 
hardy. Dr. Lea (1 pi.; 1 yr. ;) notes: a good dark pink — performed well in 
first year — healthy bush. Mrs. Packard ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 60 in. ) observes : bush 
is very tall but narrow — medium size well-formed flowers. 



169 



GARTENFREUDE, Fl. (Kordes '65). Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) com- 
ments: this is a polyanthus type, with small flowers of bright red, very pro- 
lifically-produced. 

GARTENZAUBER, Fl. (Kordes '61). Orange-scarlet. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 
yrs. ; 18 in.) reports: variety produces medium-sized blooms of good colour and 
form — bush has no vigour, will probably discard. 

GARVEY, H.T. (McGredy '61). Two-toned pink. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
18 in. ) describes this as a spreading bush — blooms long- lasting — fair repeater 

— average foliage — slight fragrance. Mr. Parker (3 pis.; 6 yrs.; 36 in.) notes: 
flowered well first part of year, but little later — little fragrance. (Last year 
( 5 ) for reporting this rose. ) 

GAVOTTE, H.T. (Sanday '63). Pink with yellow base. Mr. Magee (2 pis.; 

1 yr. ; 22 in.) comments: low bushy plant — pointed, shapely buds, a couple 
of blooms were of finest exhibition quality — free-blooming — blackspots. Mr. 
Morden (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 18 in.) reports: not too vigorous in first year — large 
blooms of exhibition form and colour, which do not hold in hot weather — 
'would like to try on multiflora'. 

GAY PRINCESS, Fl. (J.&P. '66). Shell pink. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 50 in.) 
says: this new H.T.-type rose (AARS '67) bears lots of bloom, singly and in 
clusters — tall spreading bush — another 'must' for your garden. Mrs. Packard 
(1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 30 in. ) comments : not 'gay' but very dainty — a pretty thing, 
though not a continuous bloomer for me — may need more sun. 

GEISHA, Fl. (Kordes '65). A very delicate light pink, reports Mr. Buckley 
(3 pis.; 1 yr.; 24 in.), somewhat like 'Dainty Bess' but with better colour 
saturation ; it should make a beautiful floribunda. 

GEISHA GIRL, Fl. (McGredy '64). Medium yellow. Mr. Bishop (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 
30 in. ) observes : has yet to prove itself after one season — will watch it 
closely next year. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) considers variety a good 
floribunda in this colour — well-clothed with disease-free foliage — proved 
winter hardy. 

GINGER, Fl. (Boerner J.&P. '62). Orange-red. Mr. Buckley (24 pis.; 2 yrs.; 
24 in. ) writes : without doubt an excellent bedding rose — produces its brightly 
coloured coral blooms on dwarf compact plants. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 
36 in. ) observes : a tall spreading bush — lots of exhibition-type bloom — very 
hardy — no disease. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 20 in.) reports: bloom pro- 
duction was good, however flowers just average — low spreading growth, 
disease-free foliage — winter hardy. Mrs. Packard (2 pis.; 4 yrs.; 40 in) notes: 
a wonderful rose for landscape and borders — colourful flowers. 

GIRL SCOUT, Fl. (Boerner J.&P. '60). Golden yellow. Mr. Buckley (24 pis.; 

2 yrs.; 16 in.) comments: because of light yellow flowers and light green 
leaves, it was named in honour of Girl Scouts of America a few years ago — the 
plants here were very weak, disease-ridden and not good on any count. (Last 
year for reporting this rose. ) 

GOLDEN GIANT, H.T. (Kordes '61). Deep yellow. Mrs. Antoft (12 pis.; 
1, 2 yrs.; 32 in.) reports: variety very much improved in second year — con- 
tinuous abundant bloom. Mrs. Baillie (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 24 in.) also found it very 
prolific in second year — blooms not large, does need dis-budding. Mr. Bowles 
(3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) observes: blooms are well-formed and production good 

— slightly fragrant — needs dis-budding. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 32 in.) 
notes : this rose is a nice non-fading yellow — not a good repeater. Mr. Meier 
(4 pis.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) comments: an upright bush, with good foliage — lots 
of bloom — fragrant. Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 52 in.) also points out that 



170 



bush needs dis-budding — upright, vigorous — a real good rose. For Mrs. 
Packard (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) variety was a great disappointment — few 
blooms since spring — am discarding. Mr. Parker (2 pis.; 4 yrs.; 36 in.) says: 
gives exhibition bloom if dis-budded — good colour — fragrant. Mr. West- 
brook (1 pi.; 3 yrs.) informs us: 'passed away during the winter'. (Last year 
(5) for reporting this rose.) 

GOLDEN SLIPPERS, Fl. (Von Abrams P.&D. '61). Yellow blend. Mr. De 
Kelver (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 28 in. ) comments : 'I like the colour of this rose' — very 
attractive buds, but flowers are short-lived, lots of them — no disease. Mr. 
Goulding (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 24 in.) agrees the colour is most striking in early 
stages, but blooms open out quickly and are short-lived — free-blooming. Mrs. 
Hawkins (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) found it a shy bloomer, with just average form. 
Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 5 yrs.; 18 in.) writes: blooms do not hold up long enough 
to be a good garden rose — average repeater — susceptible to blackspot. Mr. 
Parker ( 3 pis. ; 4 yrs. ) suggests its use as a bright, dwarf bush for the front row 

— very showy — blooms well, in bursts. (Last year (5) for reporting this rose.) 

GOLDSGHATZ, Fl. (Tantau '64). Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) com- 
ments: this is a floribunda rose with golden flowers of good substance, and 
dark green leaves. 

GOLDTOPAS, Fl. (Kordes '63). Yellow. This is an odd colour, petals 
sprinkled with rose — on some flowers speckling is more pronounced than on 
others, notes Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr.). Mrs. Hawkins (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 16 
in. ) reports : a low-growing bush, inclined to be tender — a few singly- 
produced flowers of unusual colour and mediocre form. Dr. Lea (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ) 
writes: very bright golden yellow — rather stingy bloomer — bush only fair, 
but first year performance satisfactory. Mrs. Packard ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) com- 
ments : a floribunda version of 'Autumn', both in flower form, colour and glossy 
foliage — 'cute'. Mr. Spencer (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 48 in.) observes: plant is strong 
and upright — blooms one of the earliest and latest, ruffled flowers up to 4 
inches — would like room enough for more — recommend. 

GRANADA, H.T. (Lindquist '63). Pink-carmine-yellow.^ Mr. Bishop (2 pis.; 
3 yrs.; 30 in.) emphasizes the attractive blooms are distinctive in colour and 
shape — prone to mildew in late summer. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 30 in.) 
notes : bears lots of flowers, but they are not long-lasting — droops badly when 
it rains — nice colour in the garden — 'I like it'. Mr. Frasier (3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 
46 in. ) reports : variety has lots of exhibition bloom — 'a very nice rose' — 
hardy, will mildew. Blooms are not large, but a very showy flower in the 
garden, writes Mr. Goulding (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) — very interesting foliage 
with waxy leaves rather like holly — susceptible to mildew. Mrs. Hawkins 
(1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 20 in.) considers the sunset colours enhance this rose of rather 
ordinary quality and just fair performance — best in cool weather. Mr. Mayer 
(1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) observes: fragrant flowers are an interesting colour, but 
small and open very quickly — tendency to be borne in clusters — resembles a 
grandiflora rather than H.T. — not an outstanding variety. Mrs. Morrison 
( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 28 in. ) thinks this rose adds colour to the garden — free-blooming 

— healthy plant. Mr. Miller (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) reports: only one plant left, others 
winter-killed — growth on this one very poor and not worthy of comment. Mr. 
Patterson (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) likes the glossy holly-like leaves — healthy 
and vigorous bush — colour blend pleasing — blooms well. Mr. Selwood (2 
pis.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) finds this a beautiful and useful garden rose, which can be 
grown to exhibition form and size with special attention; some fragrance — 
no longer suffers from mildew. Mr. Westbrook (3 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 24 in.) states: 
a low grower with me — many very attractive blooms — quite showy. 

GRAND SLAM, H.T. (Armstrong '63). Between cherry and rose-red. Mr. 
De Kelver ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 45 in. ) comments : very fast-growing bush — blooms of 



171 



good form — not a good repeater — fragrant. Mr. LafT ey ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) 
is restrained ; an unruly bush with weak stems — blooms are poor colour — 
not exhibition type. Mrs. Morrison (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) reports: foliage is good 

— not too much bloom in first year, but would recommend. 

GRUSS AN BERLIN, H.T. (Kordes '63). Light red. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi; 

1 yr. ; 50 in. ) commends this variety — has very good buds, exhibition-quality 
bloom, long-lasting — good foliage — no disease. Mr. Jenkins (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 
31 in.) reports: plant produced blooms of very good quality this year — upright 
growth. Dr. Lea (1 pi.; 1 yr.) notes: although a poor bush was received, it 
did surprisingly well — flowers well-formed, on long stems — 'a good new 
red'. Mr. Morden (4 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 21 in.) observes: not so vigorous this year 
and slow to repeat — 'I still think it a good rose'. Mr. Westbrook (3 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 
40 in. ) comments : a sturdy, upright bush with healthy foliage, one bush tried 
to become a standard — believe this one is a comer, it certainly was a crowd- 
pleaser in August. 

GRUSS AN KOBLENZ, L.C. (Kordes '63). Dark crimson. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 

2 yrs.) writes: this may be the repeat-blooming climber I have been waiting 
for; while growth and bloom were not outstanding in first year, this year the 
repeat performance was topnotch, 3 times, with plenty of excellent flowers in 
clusters — colour a delight for the red-lovers — had a small cluster (4th time) 
about 10 days ago. 

HALLMARK, H.T. (Morey int. J.&P. '66). Medium red. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 

3 yrs. ; 48 in. ) reports : variety grows tall, upright — lots of exhibition blooms 

— will mildew. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 28 in.) comments: quite free-bloom- 
ing, with a fairly well-shaped bud — 'just another red'. Mrs. Packard (1 pi. ; 
5 yrs. ; 65 in. ) writes : continues to be one of our best crimson roses — big 
blooms last a week when cut — if it had perfume it would have everything. 

HALLOWE'EN, H.T. (Int. McConnell '62). Orange-scarlet. Mrs. Morrison 
(1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 18 in.) writes: growth of this variety was slow — not many 
blooms — may improve next year — fragrant. Mrs. Paton (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 30 
in. ) observes : has good disease-resistant foliage — bears showy, large flowers 

— fragrant — hardy — recommended. Mrs. Smith (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) was well 
pleased — ■ had very large-petalled blooms, not as many this year as last ■ — 
fragrant — hardy. Mr. Sparling (1 pi.; 4 yrs.; 36 in.) comments this was more 
vigorous than ever, more blooms and slightly better than last year — still not 
impressed, except fragrance. 

HANDEL, CI. (McGredy '65). Cream edged pink. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
60 in. ) reports good growth by this rose in first year — blooms rather small but 
attractive — 'it seems to be a true ever-bloomer'. 

HAPPY EVENT, Fl. (Dickson '64). This is a very interesting floribunda, 
writes Mr. Buckley (5 pis.; 2 yrs.; 26 in.), flowers open fast, but then fade to 
a light yellow centre, with a salmon edge at the outside of the petals — not one 
to rave about but one that is different. Mr. Jubien (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 24 in.) 
notes : blooms all summer, not too many at a time — only objection, it opens 
too quickly. 

HELENE SCHOEN, H.T. (Von Abrams '62). Deep red. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 
1 yr.) relates: 'this rose was planted in autumn of '64, struggled to life in '65, 
produced one rather lovely red flower of good exhibition form and quietly 
expired'. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 40 in.) reports: a variety of upright, 
vigorous growth — blooms exhibition- type — production fair — if it stands up 
to our winters, should be around for a long time. Mrs. Morton (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 
40 in. comments : growth is leggy, not heavily foliaged — exhibition quality 
blooms, but a shy bloomer — fragrant. Mr. Westbrook (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) is 
cautious: variety bears red show-quality bloom, but plant lacks sufficient 



172 



foliage — sparse bloomer, but each flower excellent — in overall picture, the 
entire concept of the plant lacks something — what? — 'I just don't know'. 

HENKELL ROYAL, H.T. (Kordes '64). Red. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 
in. ) notes : variety bears very large flowers up to 5-inch when fully open. Mr. 
Frasier (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 48 in. ) comments : produces lots of exhibition bloom on a 
tall, upright bush — nice shiny foliage — no disease. Mr. Magee ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 
52 in. ) reports : growth tall — bud well-formed, but not too many petals — 
'just another red'. Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 28 in.) observes: does not repeat 
too well — bush is not vigorous — dark green foliage, with some blackspot. 

HEROICA, Gr. (Lens '61). Mrs. Antoft (9 pis.; 1 yr.; 22 in.) comments: 
this variety is similar to 'John S. Armstrong', but a better shaped flower al- 
though not as abundant for the first year as this later one — a vigorous tall 
bush. 

HERZ, H.T. (Tantau '63). Blood red. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) re- 
ports : variety came through first winter O.K. — made vigorous growth, with 
plenty of disease-proof foliage — production good, of excellent well-formed 
blooms — satisfactory new rose. Mr. Magee (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) notes : bush 
with fairly small blooms that has been rather ordinary for me — growth tall 
and slender. 

HEURE MAUVE, H.T. (Laperriere '63). Lilac. Mrs. Antoft (4 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 
in.) reports: this variety has large and very double blooms, attractive colour 

— dwarf, bushy plant — slight fragrance. 

HIGH ESTEEM, H.T. (Von Abrams '61 ) . Two-toned pink. Mr. Frasier ( 1 pi. ; 
3 yrs.; 50 in.) comments: a delightful rose with extreme fragrance and lots 
of exhibition bloom — some mildew. Mr. MacPherson (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 24 in. ) 
reports: plant made poor growth and mildewed badly — bloom of attractive 
colour — 'only redeeming feature was I did not pay $10 originally demanded'. 
Mrs. Morton (3 pis.; 1, 4 yrs.; 36 in.) notes: above average production of 
well-formed blooms — very fragrant — prone to mildew. 

HONEY FAVOURITE, H.T. (Von Abrams '63). Two-toned pink. Mr. 
Keenan (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 22 in.) reports: last year's plant did not survive winter 

— hope new one does, as the colour is different, a change from other recent 
varieties — low growth and good foliage — excellent exhibition quality bloom 

— not profuse. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 30 in. ) suggests : foliage is very 
fine, like 'Pink Favourite' — if disbudded, can be grown to exhibition form. 

ILSE KROHN SUPERIOR, S. (Kordes '64). White. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 yr.) 
notes : this in an everblooming sport of 'Use Krohn' — bush had several large 
heads of bloom during the summer. 

INDIANA, H.T. (G.&P. '65). Medium red. Mrs. Packard (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) 
comments: a variety a bit like 'Christian Dior', not quite as glamorous, but 
it is good. 

INGE HORTSMANN, H.T. (Tantau '64) . Bright red with pale yellow reverse. 
Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 38 in.) observes: the large blooms open too fast 

— plant vigorous and disease-free — this would be a good rose if it opened 
more slowly. 

INNISFREE, Fl. (Dickson '64). Yellow-orange-pink. Mr. Jenkins (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 
20 in.) writes: if second year growth is any indication, it wasn't worth plant- 
ing — flowered once — prone to blackspot. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 20 in.) 
also found variety very disappointing — too much blackspot — will eliminate. 
Mr. Spencer (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) reports: showed some improvement in sec- 
ond year, but was not pleased with growth or colour — summer blooms were 



173 



about size of 'Masquerade' and same number of petals — colour is undecided 

— blooms do not last well, slow to repeat — fall bloom showed improvement 

— will try one more year. 

INTERMEZZO, H.T. (Dot '62) Lavender. In the opinion of Mrs. Antoft 
(15 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) the variety is one of the best in this new colour — 
second year showed taller growth and rich bloom during entire season — 
fragrant. Mr. Jubien (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) notes : we are all looking for a good 
lavender, and this seems to be the best in this colour class — lots of bloom, 
and it stands up very well in hot weather. Mr. Meier (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 26 in.) 
reports : blooms large, but not a heavy bloomer — needs protection from mil- 
dew. Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 1 6 in. ) states : just another lavender, with no 
vigour — will discard. Mr. Parker (3 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) comments: bushy 
plant with good stems — blooms well but slow to repeat. 

INVITATION, H.T. (Swim & Weeks '61). Salmon-pink. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 
3 yrs. ; 38 in. ) reports : variety was excellent in first year, not quite so good in 
second, mediocre this year — evidently does not like our winters — may dis- 
card. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) comments: medium size blooms are 
good form and colour — slow to repeat — not too vigorous in first year. Mrs. 
Packard ( 2 pis. ; 5 yrs. ; 90 in. ) notes : few roses could endure under the shade 
of a small tree as these have — bears continuous, exquisite blooms with per- 
fume and good colour. 

ISABEL DE ORTIZ, H.T. (Kordes '62). Rose-red with silvery reverse. Mrs. 
Antoft (20 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) writes: 'this rose is, in our opinion, a glamour- 
ized 'Miss Canada' — it is larger, fuller, better colour, more blooms, more 
fragrance, stronger and healthier — still, neither is an eye-stopper in this part 
of the country'. Mrs. Baillie (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 30 in.) comments: blooms are ex- 
cellent in form and quality — not floriferous — tall and healthy bush. Mr. 
Bishop (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) reports: bush of upright growth and disease- 
resistant — blooms are of exhibition standard, but wish there were more. Mr. 
Collier (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) finds it very slow in growth — -few blooms of 
exhibition quality. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) notes: gave a very 
good performance this year, lots of perfect blooms — lasts well and is fragrant. 
Mrs. Gallagher (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.) writes: an unusual blend of colours — slow 
in repeating — 'a good rose'. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 50 in.) feels it is 
definitely a show type — 'but could stand more bloom'. According to Mr. 
Goulding (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) 'one of our best roses in the garden'. Mrs. 
Hawkins (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 19 in.) explains: for two years my bush produced well 
and often, the third year finds it barely alive. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 26 in.) 
advises : blooms are of excellent quality — sparse, particularly in the fall. Mr. 
McDougall (2 pis.; 4 yrs.; 36 in.) agrees as to exhibition quality of the bloom 

— good foliage, disease-free. Mr. McNally (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) says: the few 
blooms produced were pleasing — good stems and attractive foliage through- 
out the season. Mr. Meier (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 48 in.) refers to the upright growth 
and excellent foliage — a moderate bloomer. Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 
31 in. ) observes : was slow to repeat this year and developed blackspot — bloom 
is exhibition form and colour. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 26 in.) agrees as 
to quality of bloom, but finds it sparse. Dr. Moyle ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) says : 
'this is one of the newer good ones'. Mr. Patterson (3 pis.; 2, 3 yrs.; 36 in.) 
notes : bloom has good form, petals unroll spirally — some fragrance. Mr. 
Selwood (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) observes: an upright plant with good, healthy 
foliage — moderate bloomer. Mr. Sparling (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) also refers to 
the good foliage — excellent bloom — will get more. Mr. Westbrook (4 pis.; 
1, 2 yrs.; 30 in.) comments: proved winter hardy — 'a most satisfactory 
variety'. Mr. White (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) also found it very satisfactory. The 
writer (1 pi.; 3 yrs.) must confess to complete failure with this variety — a 
poor bush, never became established — discarded. 



174 



JACK FROST, H.T. (Int. Great West Nurseries '62). White. Mrs. Guadagni 
(1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) reports: a bush with satisfactory foliage, well-clothed — 
bears exhibition-type blooms — 'one of the best whites I have ever grown'. 
Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) notes: high quality blooms only infrequently 
produced — no doubt my plant suffers from being in the shade. Mr. Jenkins 
(1 pi. ; 2 yrs., 27 in. ) observes : has exhibition bloom in the spring but seldom 
repeats — good foliage. Mr. McDougall (1 pi.; 4 yrs.) agrees: excellent blooms 

— good foliage, disease-free. 

JAMAICA, H.T. (Lindquist int. Howard '65). Rose-red. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 
2 yrs. ; 50 in. ) reports : a variety of tall, upright growth — lots of nice bloom 

— no disease. Mr. Selwood ( 2 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 60 in. ) comments : good foliage — 
blooms freely produced and long-lasting — while not quite exhibition form, it 
is a very fair rose. 

JOHN CHURCH, Fl. (McGredy '64) . Orange-red. Mr. Bishop (2 pis.; 1 yr.) 
considers this a charming addition to the floribundas — bush small, but 
neatly shaped — blooms very much like H.T.s, and grow singly. Mr. Magee 
(1 pi.; 1 yr.; 16 in.) suggests variety as a good foreground plant — dwarf 
bush, with nice buds. 

JOHN F. KENNEDY, H.T. (Boerner J.&P. '65). White. Mr. Buckley (25 pis.; 
2 yrs.; 48 in.) reports: with a larger quantity of flowers this year, its quality 
could be better assessed — produced an abundance of blossoms on the new 
plants, the old ones were much more reluctant to flower. Mrs. Gallagher (1 pi. ; 
1 yr.) notes: variety bears beautiful bloom of excellent substance — elegant 
foliage — 'excellent in all respects'. Mr. Frasier (4 pis.; 2 yrs.; 62 in.) reports: 
bush tall and upright — lots of bloom — hardy. Miss Jacques (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 
36 in.) comments: bloom is extraordinarily long-lasting, on bush and when 
cut — exhibition quality — 'a beautiful rose'. Mr. Jenkins (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 23 in) 
points out foliage is small but healthy — flowers, however, leave much to be 
desired, too small — hope for improvement. Mrs. Packard (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 30 
in.) writes: not for this area, although it does have exhibition blooms occa- 
sionally. 

JOHN S. ARMSTRONG. Gr. (Armstrong '61). Dark red. Mrs. Antoft (28 pis.; 
1, 2, 3 yrs.; 54 in.) writes: still the most popular of the dark red grandi- 
floras, grows into a very tall bush in 2 or 3 years, with an enormous amount of 
bloom. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 36 iri.) considers this a good bedding variety 
of strong growth — burning of blooms in strong sun and consequent dark 
splotches, mar the flowers for cutting. Mr. Bowles (3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) 
confesses : 'I cannot enthuse about this rose' — while floriferous, blooms are 
flat and full-petalled — healthy and hardy. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 
36 in.) says: 'I like the colour of this rose, but it burns easily in the sun — not 
a free bloomer. Mrs. Foot (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 48 in. ) states : blooms are rather flat, 
but effective and long-lasting — colour holds well — continuous bloomer. 
Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 64 in. ) notes : 'a must for every garden' — very 
hardy. Mr. Goulding (4 pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) suggests: probably the most prolific 
bloomer in my garden, bloom very lovely in early stages. Mr. Grindle (1 pi. ; 
1 yr. ; 30 in.) reports: not many flowers in first year — foliage fairly healthy ■ — 
intend to try more. Dr. Lea (1 pi. ; 4 yrs. ) observes : this continues to do well 
year after year, though it continues to display two annoying traits, i.e. weak 
necks, and quick fading to a flat, dull shade of red. Mr. Mayer (5 pis.; 2 yrs.; 
30 in. ) notes : performed better than last year, but still not up to expectations 

— vigour still lacking — shall go along with it for another year. Mrs. Morrison 
(1 pi.; 1 yr.; 22 in.) finds the bloom is not good shape, though colour is nice 

— 'not my favourite red'. (Last year (5) for reporting this rose.) 

JUNIOR MISS, FI. (Boerner '65). Light pink. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
16 in. ) comments : this variety produces small blooms of H.T. - form and 



175 



good colour — slow to repeat — bush is dwarf and disease-resistant — 'a good 
garden rose'. 

KAISERIN FARAH, H.T. (Kordes '65). Brilliant red. This could be a good 
rose, in the opinion of Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 20 in.) — medium size 
blooms are good form and colour — slow to repeat — appears disease-resistant. 

KING'S RANSOM, H.T. (Morey int. '61). Golden yellow. Mrs. Antoft 
(15 pis.; 1, 2, 3, yrs.; 40 in.) reports: this variety has grown to per- 
fection in second and third years — a beauty to behold in every way — unfad- 
ing bloom all season. Mr. Bowles (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) notes: produces an 
abundance of excellent golden yellow blooms that do not fade, which is un- 
usual — 'I like this one'. Mrs. Foot (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) comments: rather 
compact bush — beautiful flower of excellent form — one ofthe best in my 
garden. The choice of all the yellows, in the opinion of Mr. Goulding (3 pis. 
2 yrs.; 36 in.). Mrs. Guadagni (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) notes: growth habits ex- 
cellent — bloom of good form and unfading colour — profuse bloomer. Mrs. 
Hawkins (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ) observes : each year, in my experience, choice yellows 
such as this lose a bit of what vigour they have, until they finally give up. Mr. 
MacPherson (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) states: upright, but so far, thin growth 

— beautifully-shaped flowers are rain-resistant and fine unfading yellow — not 
very robust so far. Mr. Mayer (4 pis.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) says: am coming to like 
this variety more and more — 'one of the best yellow H.T.s'. Mr. McNally 
(1 pi. ; 3 yrs.; 30 in.) advises: one plant died first winter — without doubt 
other performed best this fall, few blooms but extra good — seemed to im- 
prove with age. Mr. Meier (4 pis.; 1 yr. ; 42 in.) says: expect a better per- 
formance next year. Mr. Parker (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36in.) notes: good bushy plant 

— blooms medium-sized and well-formed. Mr. Perrault (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) 
considers this a good yellow, though on the small side — healthy — hardy. 
Mr. Westbrook (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) relates: after losing 6 in 3 years, tried 
again — may be this exhibition beauty will survive this winter. Mr. White 
(1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) finds this a very promising new variety — with good 
quality bloom — fragrant. (Last year (5) for reporting this rose.) 

KLAUS STORTEBEKER, H.T. (Kordes '62). Bright red. Mr. McNally 
(2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) writes: if only this rose did not open so quickly it would 
be a winner — bloom production was fair, stems strong, and foliage really 
something — ordered 2 more. Mr. Parker (4 pis.; 3, 4 yrs.) reports: bears 
large exhibition blooms, but did not do well this year — no fragrance. 

KORDES GARTENFREUDE, Fl. (Kordes '65). Orange-red. Mr. Magee 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 16 in. ) comments : this is a dwarf and distinctive floribunda — 
blackspots — shall await further experience. 

KRONENBOURG, H.T. (McGredy '65). Rich claret with yellow reverse. Mrs. 
Antoft (8 pis.; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) reports: early blooms of this variety not up to 
expectations, small in size, colour very dull — improved in the fall — hope 
for better results next year. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) comments: a 
sport of 'Peace', this rose has the habits of its parent — well-formed bloom, 
the claret bicolour is most attractive — should prove a winner (have had 
blooms 5 inches across). According to Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) this 
was one of the 2 most outstanding new H.T.s under test this year — like 
'Peace' in foliage, vigour, size and form of bloom, but a perfect well-saturated 
sport of a completely different colour; it fades to purple, however, a trait 
which may lose friends, but certainly not those who exhibit roses. Mr. Collier 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) states : showed very healthy and robust growth — produced 
giant-size blooms. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 34 in. ) notes : has very attrac- 
tive buds, but blossom fades when aging. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 39 in. ) ad- 
vises : medium spreading bush — lots of nice bicolour flowers — has all its 
parent's good habits. Mr. Goulding (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) reports: made a poor 



176 



showing in first year — poor growth and very few blooms — reserves judgment. 
Mr. Keenan (1 pi. ; 1 yr.; 36 in.) comments: a husky grower, well-clothed with 
good foliage — while late starting had plenty of blooms first year — hope it 
takes our winter so I can give a complete report next year. Mr. Magee ( 3 pis. ; 
1 yr. ; 20 in. ) observes : a controversial variety with changeable colour, some- 
times as pale as 'Anne Letts', sometimes medium red with lighter reverse — 
many split centres, but many beautiful blooms. Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 19 
in. ) says : bush not vigorous in first year — because of its colour it will never 
be as popular as parent 'Peace'. Mrs. Morton (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) notes: 
bloom is eye-catching in the bud, but loses its beauty when fully open — vigor- 
ous, healthy bush. 

LAVENDULA, Fl. (Kordes '65). Lavender. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) 
reports : this is a small compact bush — profuse bloomer — 'the best lavender 
in our garden'. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 14 in.) does not agree: just another 
lavender, with no vigour in first year — will probably discard after another 
year if it does not do better. 

LEGENDARY, H.T. (P.&D. '62). Pale pink. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 40 in.) 
comments: this variety bears well-formed blooms a little on the small side 
— free-flowering — balls badly in wet weather. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ) 
notes: this one is similar in colour to 'Royal Highness', which is a better rose. 
Mr. Westbrook (3 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 36 in.) finds variety hardy and a good 
producer — plenty of medium-size blooms on well-foliaged upright bush. 

LEMON SPICE, H.T. (Armstrong '67). Light yellow. Mrs. Packard (2 pis.; 
1 yr. ; 38 in. ) notes : a fast - growing, spreading plant, with bloom of the type 
of 'Eclipse' — foliage is not too attractive — may improve next year. 
LEPRECHAUN, Fl. (McGredy '64). Red and white blend. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 

1 yr. ; 28 in. ) observes : variety is a low-growing bush — bears nice bloom and 
lots of it — very nice compact plant for front of bed — no disease. 

LIBERTY BELL, H.T. (Kordes '63). Deep pink with lighter reverse. Mrs. 
Baillie (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) writes: a rose which is hardy and healthy — 
blooms large, not too many — certainly at its best in the fall. Mr. Buckley 
( 3 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) reports : produced a better crop of its full-bodied, deep 
rose-pink blooms than last year — plants very vigorous and tall. Mr. Collier 
(1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) comments: sparse bloomer first season, but much im- 
proved in second — growth healthy and upright — 'I am not impressed with 
the bloom, but feel its colouring is most attractive'. Mr. Morden (4 pis.; 1, 3 
yrs.; 26 in.) notes: not as vigorous this year, best in the fall — still, a good 
garden rose. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) observes: healthy foliage — large 
blooms, but few — find it disappointing. Mr. Parker (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) 
states : plants did not do much in first year — seems very like 'Isabel de Ortiz', 
with yellow, instead of white reverse. Mr. White (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) finds 
this variety a vigorous grower — good blooms, not very free-flowering — not 
quite up to expectation. 

LILAC CHARM, Fl. (LeGrice '61). Pale lilac-mauve. Mrs. ^ Baillie (1 pi.; 

2 yrs. ; 20 in. ) writes : the delicate loveliness of this little single is a great 
joy to me, even if blooms last only a short time — certainly the best of the 
lilacs — have increased my planting. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 50 in. ) notes : 
a profuse bloomer, with a colour that holds — no disease. Mrs. Hawkins 
(1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 19 in.) reports: second year performance quite pleasing — 'a 
rose to delight the connoisseur'. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 20 in.) comments: 
the dark red anthers make the flowers attractive when open — continuously in 
bloom. Mr. Parker (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 18 in.) observes: low-growing plant — 
single bloom — flowering periods brief, but soon repeats. 

LITTLE FLIRT, Min. (Moore '61). Red blend. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 
10 in. ) comments : the colour of this miniature is attractive, but bloom is loose 
and rather on the large side. 



177 



LOTTE GUNTHART, H.T. (Armstrong '65). Dark crimson. Mr. Morin 
(1 pi;. 1 yr.; 36 in.) comments: this variety bears enormous full blooms (like 
a chrysanthemum), lasting very well, but not many in first year — very good 
foliage — no fragrance. Mr. Laffey (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) reports: not impressed 
so far by this one — very few blooms — healthy foliage. 

LUCKY LADY, H.T. (Int. Armstrong '66). Light pink. Mrs. Packard (2 pis.; 
1 yr.; 40 in.) observes: this is a tall plant, with shaded light pink blooms on 
the style of 'Pink Parfait' or 'First Love' — blooms last well when cut — 
buds are lovely (AARS '67) . 

LUCKY PIECE, H.T. (Gordon int. Wyant '62). Salmon-pink. Mrs. Gal- 
lagher ( 1 pi. ; 4 yrs. ) comments : this is a shrub-like bush, up to 7 feet in our 
garden — its very double blooms of pink-orange shades are intriguing. Mrs. 
Hawkins (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 24 in. ) observes : peach-pink bloom, not as heavy as 
'Peace' — strong bush with leathery dark foliage — performs steadily — free 
of disease. Mr. Parker (2 pis.; 2 yrs.) points out this rose seems identical with 
'Chicago Peace' — a 'Peace' with more pink. 

LUCY CRAMPHORN, H.T. (Kriloff '60). Orange-red. Mr. Collier (1 pi.; 

1 yr. ; 24 in.) reports: this is a plant of spreading and vigorous habit — 
prolific bloomer — ■ early blooms are of exhibition form. Mr. Keenan (1 pi. ; 

2 yrs.; 33 in.) comments: a variety worth growing — blooms of exhibition 
type — upright growth — proved winter-hardy. Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 
42 in.) notes: medium size blooms are good colour, which holds well — 
vigorous bush with good foliage. Mrs. Packard (2 pis.; 4 yrs.; 60 in.) states: 
this is still improving — large, full very glamorous blooms, though not quite 
enough. (Last year for reporting this rose.) 

MAINZER FASTNACHT, H.T. (Tantau '65). Silvery-lilac-blue. Mr. Morden 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr.; 23 in.) notes: this rose seems to be the same as 'Blue Moon', 
although it is listed as introduced a year later — large fragrant blooms of 
exhibition form and colour were produced — showed a little more vigour than 
most roses of this shade — could be a good show rose. 

MANOLA, H.T. (Kriloff '63). Geranium-red. Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 
20 in.) comments: variety produces large blooms of good form and colour — 
slow to repeat — not so vigorous this year as last — foliage dark green, 
seems to be disease-free. 

MANX QUEEN, Fl. (Dickson '63). Gold with orange tips. Mrs. Antoft (5 pis.; 

1 yr.; 20 in.) reports: colour of this rose is identical with 'Piccadilly' — its 
special charm attracts much praise, and it makes an excellent vigorous bush 
— fragrant. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 14 in.) notes: plants of this variety 
not very robust yet, although they survived the winer well. Mr. Magee (1 pi. ; 

2 yrs. ; 48 in.) writes : plant improved over last year — 'I don't like some of this 
type, and only rate this fair'. 

MARGOT FONTEYN, H.T. (McGredy '64). Salmon-orange. Mr. Keenan 
(1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 20 in.) writes: bush was slow to get started, probably due to 
our late spring — is low-growing, with excellent disease-free foliage — flowers 
good size and form. Mr. White (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) notes: bore good quality 
blooms — exquisite perfume — free-flowering — hope it proves hardy, as it is 
a very satisfactory variety. 

MARLENA, Fl. (Kordes '64). Crimson. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 18in.) 
comments : this outstanding dwarf floribunda was loaded with blooms all sum- 
mer long, at first it looked like a compact form of 'Lilli Marlene), but upon 
comparison this variety is much deeper in colour and yet not as deep as 
'Europeana' — has some white in the centre. Mr. Jubien (3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 
20 in.) writes: 'the best new red floribunda I have seen, sure beats the old 



178 



ones for size of blooms and lots of them' — more stock on order for '67. Mr. 
Parker (3 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 18 in.) observes: a dwarf bush — crimson bloom in 
trusses — repeats quickly. 

MATTERHORN, H.T. (Armstrong '65). White. Mrs. Baillie (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
36 in. ) writes : a tall disease-free bush — never had a first year rose bloom so 
prolifically — blooms smallish, more like grandiflora — 'one of the best whites 
for some time'. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 48 in.) observes: this is vigorous, 
tall, free-blooming, with nicely-shaped buds. Mr. Buckley (25 pis.; 1 yr.; 
36 in.) notes: a producer of excellent florist-type blooms — rather more ser- 
viceable as cut flowers than for overall bedding effect. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 
1 yr. ; 5 5in. ) advises : had lots of bloom of show quality — tall upright bush. 
Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 26 in.) notes: dark green foliage, free of disease 

— good white in type and substance, more like 'Message' than 'Virgo'. Miss 
Jacques (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 48 in. ) says : not an attractively-shaped bush — blooms 
large, but undistinguished as far as I am concerned, perhaps because of first 
year. Mr. Keenan ( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 48 in. ) reports : large flowers, are inclined to 
ball in cool damp weather — plenty of them in first year — good foliage, with 
slight trace of mildew. For Mr. Laffey (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) it was a most dis- 
appointing plant — 'I think 'pascali' a much better white in every way'. 
Dr. Lea (1 pi.; 1 yr.) considers this an excellent new white — buds long 
and pointed, open slowly, and the open flowers continue to have good shape. 
Miss Mason (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 52 in. ) also mentions the 'magnificent long tapered 
bud, an excellent variety'. Mr. Mayer (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) says: plant 
vigorous, but few flowers — shape of blooms not particularly outstanding 

— a disappointment so far. Mr. Miller (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 32 in.) states: blooms 
were excellent — this is a good rose for cutting — only complaint is very 
rough canes. In the opinion of Mr. Gordon (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 26 in.) this is one 
of the best whites to date — 'I saw a potted 'Matterhorn' with 3 inch buds' — 
will increase stock. Dr. Moyle (2 pis.; 1 yr.) observes: have seen nothing to 
recommend this new rose to date. Mr. Patterson (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) thinks 
this will be an exhibition rose, but it has not the form and white purity of 
'White Knight'. Mr. Perrault (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) notes: plant started growth 
late, not yet had a bloom — probably too dry — await another year. 

MAUVE MELODEE, H.T. (Raffel int. Port Stockton Nursery '62). Mrs. 
Packard (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) writes: this has not been a strong plant, but 
the blooms are far superior in colour than any of the mauves, clear and deeper 
than others. 

MELROSE, H.T. (Dickson '63). Creamy-white overlaid cherry-red. Mrs. 
An toft (4 pis.; 1 yr.; 28 in.) comments: variety resembles 'Kordes Perfecta' 
with more contrast in colouring — attracts much attention — good flower 
production — very fragrant. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 15 in.) states: big 
disappointment in second year — the few blooms produced were of exhibition 
form and colour, but plant lacked vigour. Mrs. Morton (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) 
writes : this has been compared with 'Perfecta' — would suggest colouring is 
superior, while form is not so good — average production. Mr. Patterson 
(1 pi.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) found the plant was not vigorous, but will hope for 
further improvement. Mr. White (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 48 in.) notes: very vigorous 
growth and very prolific — blooms early with good quality flowers — 'very 
promising variety'. Mr. Whitlock (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) refers to the tall and 
very erect bush — bloom darker than 'Perfecta', certainly not as described. 

MEMORIAM, H.T. (Von Abrams P.&D. '61). White to pale luminous pink. 
Mrs. Antoft (12 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 42 in.) reports: this rose of perfect shape had a 
wealth of blooms all season, especially on 2 year plants — excellent for cut- 
ting and show — very fragrant. Mrs. Baillie (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 24 in. ) comments : 
bloomed well this year in a dry season — a truly lovely rose, with some exhibi- 
tion blooms and a delight to look at — 'I still dislike the name'. Mr. Bishop 



179 



( 3 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) observes : blooms beautiful but sparse and suffer in wet 
weather — at its best would be an excellent show rose — growth slow in first 
year. Mr. Collier (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 16 in.) notes: has been a sparse bloomer, but 
the few were exceptionally good, in a cool wet season. Mr. Goulding (2 pis.; 
2 yrs. ; 24 in.) finds this a most perfectly-formed rose — beautiful shade of 
pinkish-white — free-blooming. It dislikes wet weather, says Mrs. Hawkins 
(2 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 20 in.). Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) also mentions: 
flowers will ball in cool, damp weather, a problem with many-petalled varieties. 
Mr. McNally (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) concurs: still a good show rose. Mr. 
Meier ( 2 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 40 in. ) writes : a very beautiful luminous-pink rose — 
large blooms of classic form do not hold up in wet weather. Mr. Morden 
(2 pis.; 2, 3 yrs.; 20 in.) finds this rose performs the same on canina or multi- 
flora — blooms large and exhibition form. Mr. Parker (3 pis.; 5 yrs.; 30 in.) 
feels variety blooms well for such a large rose — enough colour to keep it 
from being insipid — has done well this year. Mr. Whitlock (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 48 
in.) advises: this variety found a season to its liking, just grew and grew 
and bloomed — we had very little rain to cause balling, and so dozens of 
beautiful roses. (Last year (5) for reporting this rose.) 

MEXICANA, H.T. (J.&P. '65). Red blend. Mr. Buckley (25 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 
in.) reports: this variety gave a fine performance with abundant blooms of 
exhibition calibre, on good, disease-free plants — one of the most outstanding 
roses in the garden this year. Mr. Magee (2 pis.; 2 yrs: ; 32 in.) comments: has 
attractive blooms, mostly well-formed — can be very beautiful variety — growth 
bushy, not too strong — mildews. 

MIGNONNE, H.T. (Gaujard '63). Salmon-pink. Mr. Magee (2 pis.; 2 yrs.) 
notes: beautiful dwarf medium-sized variety — bushes were transplanted this 
spring — blooms are borne singly, otherwise H.T.-type floribunda — a lovely 
arrangement rose. Mrs. Packard ( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 28 in. ) writes : this is a darling, 
a light pink that is clear and clean. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 46 in.) com- 
ments : a spreading bush with lots of small bloom, ideal for arrangements — 
very hardy — little mildew. 

MILORD, H.T. (McGredy '62). Crimson-scarlet. Mr. De Kelver (2 pis.; 1 
yr. ; 26 in.) points out: bloom of this rose is borne singly on good stems — 
well-shaped buds — fragrant — no disease. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 60 in. ) 
observes : a variety of upright growth — lots of bloom of good form — a nice 
average rose. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 4 yrs.; 36 in.) writes: a top garden rose in 
my set-up — continuous bloomer — if disbudded could win a ribbon on the 
show bench. Mr. Laffey (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 28 in.) does not consider this an exhi- 
bition type — fairly good bloomer, but has poor form and weak stems — will 
give another chance. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 32 in.) reports: gave a better 
performance this year, but still nothing exceptional. Mr. Parker (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 
30 in. ) notes : colour is good, but blooms are loose, poor form — lacks 
fragrance. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ) comments : early buds must be disbudded 
if exhibition blooms are desired — second crop should be left for garden 
decoration, usually coming as candelabra growth. 

MISCHIEF, H.T. (McGredy '61). Coral-salmon. In the opinion of Mrs. Antoft 
(14 pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) this is a very charming variety — good flower produc- 
tion on a vigorous upright plant — fragrant — however, here in N.S. pink 
flowers are not favoured. Mr. Collier (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 20 in.) notes: produced 
many more blooms in first year, may not like cool weather, such as we had this 
year — excellent form — quite fragrant. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 32 in.) 
reports : always in bloom — good repeater — no disease — fragrant — hardy. 
Mrs. Gallagher (6 pis.; 2 yrs.) writes: a wonderful rose in bud and bloom, 
long-lasting — fragrant. Mrs. Hawkins (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 34 in.) says: in spite of 
established opinion this rose just misses for me. I admit it keeps blooming and 
doesn't have any troubles. Mr. Keenan (3 pis.; 1, 5 yrs.; 20 in.) states: still 



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one of my favourite roses — an excellent garden variety. Mr. Magee ( 3 pis. ; 
3 yrs.; 36 in.) agrees it is 'one of the best' — free-blooming — very healthy. 
'Blooms so little I would like to reserve judgment' explains Miss Mason (1 pi. ; 

2 yrs.; 32 in.). Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 25 in.) observes: the small blooms 
seem to be borne continuously — good garden rose. Mrs. Packard ( 2 pis. ; 

3 yrs.; 30 in.) advises: suffered from die-back this year, after being wonderful 
first year or so — do not understand what is happening. Mr. Parker (5 pis.; 

4 yrs.; 36 in.) notes: a good garden and cut bloom variety of great merit — 
very free bloomer. Mr. Westbrook (3 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 36 in.) also considers this 
an excellent garden and cutting rose — 'you need this one'. Mr. White (4 pis.; 
2, 3 yrs. ) similarly comments : a most satisfactory rose — hardy and disease- 
free — hard to fault. (Last year (5) for reporting this rose.) 

MISS CANADA, H.T. (Blakeney '64) . Rose madder with silver reverse. Mrs. 
Antoft (20 pis.; 1 yr.; 26 in.) comments: this Centennial variety has been 
over-exposed to too heavy propagation, as the plants we received from several 
leading nurseries were very small and spindly, and did not produce the boasted 
quality we expected — resembles 'Isabel de Ortiz' but in no way up to that 
variety — badly affected by blackspot and exceptionally thorny. By contrast, 
Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) writes: Canada should be proud of this 
rose — am pleased with attractive and well-formed blooms — 'but what an 
array of thorns which stand on guard'. Mr. Bowles (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) feels 
this rose is promising but would like more experience with it. Mr. De Kelver 
(3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) finds the blooms are of exhibition form, long-lasting, 
non-fading — no disease. Mrs. Gallagher (4 pis.; 1 yr.) notes: very attractive 
in the bud — heavy 'Peace'-like foliage — thorny stems. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 
1 yr. ; 34 in. ) observes : a sturdy bush — lots of bloom — very pretty colour. 
Mr. Goulding ( 3 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) points out plant needs room, due to sprawl- 
ing habit — blooms excellent quality and exhibition type. Mrs. Hawkins 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 20 in. ) writes : very pleasing colour combination, plus good form 
and substance, make this a worth-while new rose. Miss Jacques (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 
24 in. ) thinks it looks its best in the bud to about half-open — very appealing 

— colourful. Mr. Jenkins (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 21 in.) also prefers the spring bloom 

— high-centred attractive bicolour. Mr. Jubien ( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) makes an 
interesting point : 'I found a variation in the blooms, in my garden if they were 
left to open on the bush they bloomed very quickly, in 12-24 hours; however, 
if picked in bud stage and taken indoors in a cool room, they lasted 4 to 5 
days, and looked very good ; I would say that it does not take the heat ; forty 
bushes in Mount Royal Cemetery, where it is much cooler, were outstanding. 
Mr. MacPherson (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 28 in.) notes: very thorny and straggly — 
sparse bloom but good colour and shape — wish it were more vigorous. Mr. 
Magee ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 28 in. ) advises : fine exhibition bloom on a bushy plant — 
blackspots with me. Mr. Mayer (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) states: blooms are an 
interesting colour but not outstanding — tend to ball in wet weather — 
foliage glossy and disease-resistant — sprawling habit — all in all there are 
better bicolours on the market today. (Note : of the two combatants in the new 
War of the Roses, I am tempted to say with Shakespeare, 'a plague on both 
your houses'.) Mrs. MacDonlad (12 pis.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) says: continuously in 
bloom since June — colour is exactly as described — undamaged by rain or 
light frost — vigorous and spreading — 'a good Canadian rose'. Mr. Morden 
(2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 18 in.) confesses: my biggest disappointment for '66 — petals 
lack substance and blooms were full-blown in a matter of hours — 2 bushes 
produced total of 6 flowers all season. Mr. Miller (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 17 in.) writes: 
bushes not too tall, but production and quality excellent — disappointed in 
life of buds when cut. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) differs: 'nicest bicolour 
we have'; an opinion shared by Mrs. Morrison (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 25 in.). Mrs. Mor- 
ton (3 pis.; 1, 4 yrs.; 26 in.) also is favourably impressed. Dr. Moyle (1 pi.; 
1 yr. ; 20 in.) adds: ended the season with one super bloom. Mr. Patterson 
(2 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) calls the rose 'rather disappointing', as does Mr. Perrault 



181 



(3 pis.; 1 yr.) — very bad with blackspot. Mr. Selwood (2 pis.; 3 yrs.) notes: 
it is free-blooming, flowers long-lasting — bush upright and sprawling. Mr. 
Sparling (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) reports : some fair bloom in first year — have 
seen some exquisite blooms in this area. Mr. Westbrook (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) 

observes: 'maybe I shall be accused of being unpatriotic, but I don't like it 

just another bicolour. The writer (3 pis.; 1 yr.) considers this a good bedding 
rose — lots of bloom — clean foliage — there are an awful lot of worse ones 
being sold ! 

MISS IRELAND, H.T. (McGredy '61) : Orange-yellow. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 
4 yrs.; 22 in.) reports: variety has done very well in my garden — 'I prize the 
unusual golden-orange shades — bud is very lovely, the open flower a bit 
shaggy. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 4 yrs.;) reports: after moving this rose each 
year to different spots, it finally came to town in '66 — not a prolific bloomer, 
but has excellent form. Mr. Magee (2 pis.; 4 yrs.; 32 in.) suggests: can reach 
show table and is a worthwhile variety. Mr. Morin (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 20 in. ) com- 
ments : not too many blooms first year, but a very striking colour — slow 
repeating. Mrs. Morton (1 pi. ; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) also thinks the colour is attractive 
but blooms lack substance and open very quickly. Mr. Parker (3 pis.; 4 yrs.; 
30 in) observes: suffered from late spring frost and did not recover till late — 
disappointing this year. 

MISTER LINCOLN, H.T. (Armstrong '65). Rich red. Mrs. Antoft (2 pis. 

1 yr. ; 28 in.) considers this a very nice red rose, but it did not stand up to ad- 
vance billing — reserve judgment. Mr. Collier (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 20 in. ) reports : 
made a very poor showing in second year — colour nice, but burns in sun, 
when cut it opens too quickly — cannot see this an AARS!' Mr. De Kelver 
(2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 44 in.) observes: a splendid rose — blooms freely produced — 
fragrant. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 60 in.) says: to me 'just another rose'. Mr. 
Goulding ( 2 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 40 in. ) notes : tall, upright bush — free-blooming, ex- 
hibition quality. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 16 in.) comments: a 'do nothing' 
plant, if I ever had one — this year: one cane, one rose. Mr. Laffey (4 pis.; 2 
yrs. ; 48 in. ) points out blossoms are large but there are not too many of them. 
Dr. Lea (1 pi.; 2 yrs) is restrained: this one does not impress, either in per- 
formance or appearance — bush small and straggly, with few new canes 
after early season — only a few blooms, satisfactory but not extraordinary. Miss 
Mason (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 49 in.) reports: vigorous grower, with not too many 
blooms, but of excellent quality. Mr. Mayer (9 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 36 in.) enthuses: 
definitely one of the better reds introduced in recent years — colour clear and 
intense — classic H.T.-form — vigorous and erect. For Mr. Miller (4 pis.; 
1, 2 yrs. ; 21 in.) the quantity of blooms was much better this year, an excellent 
cutting rose. Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 28 in.) finds it a good repeater, but 
not too vigorous. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) comments: blooms on single tall 
stems, not too long-lasting — good repeater — strong fragrance. 'I still prefer 
'Americana' to this one, or 'John S. Armstrong' says Mrs. Morrison (1 pi.; 

2 yrs.; 28 in.). Dr. Moyle (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.) states: did not obtain one really good 
bloom from it in '66. Mr. Patterson (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) found the rose a disappoint- 
ment — few blooms, do not like form — other reds far superior — will not 
keep. Mr. Selwood (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 48 in.) writes: 'hope springs eternal', but 
so far I have had only 2 really good blooms — evidently variety inherited 
some of Charles Mallerin's orneriness. Mrs. Smith (1 pi.; 1 yr.) says: 'delight- 
ful' — flowers not as large as anticipated, but well-formed and fragrant. Mr. 
Westbrook (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) observes: produced dull, insipid red blooms 
once in a while — shall discard. The writer (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) considers this a 
greatly over-rated rose — below average production — disappointing. 

MOUNT SHASTA, Gr. (Swim & Weeks '63). Mr. Frasier (2 ph.; 4 yrs.; 60 
in.) considers this an excellent white — exhibition-type, long-lasting bloom — 
'one of the best'. Mr. Keenan (1 pi. ; 4 yrs. ; 36 in. ) observes : a variety easy to 
grow, but not so vigorous this year — bloom substance on the thin side. Dr. 



182 



Lea (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.) reports: an excellent rose in every respect — lots of 
bloom, very pleasing flowers. Mr. MacPherson (3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 40 in.) com- 
ments : sparse bloomer, with the occasional well-formed flower — am looking 
forward to established plants, as variety is likely to stay with us. Mr. McNally 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) writes : the best white in the garden — good repeater — 
big blooms and satisfactory foliage. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 60 in. ) notes : 
good foliage — produces fine exhibition blooms. 

MYSTERIUM, Fl. (Kordes '64). Orange-yellow blend. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 2 
yrs;. 36 in.) comments: this is a strong-growing bush that was attractive this 
year — upright and large-flowered — not quite topnotch. For the writer 
(2 pis.; 1 yr.) this rose proved the surprise of the year; sent as a substitute 
for an unavailable variety, it was one of the most colourful additions to the 
garden — floriferous — vigorous bush. 

NEW EUROPE (Nouvelle Europe), Fl. (Gaujard int. Ilgenfritz '64). Ver- 
milion. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) comments: this is an excellent 
brick-red floribunda — seems to have good bedding qualities. Mr. Frasier 
(1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) reports: bears lots of single blooms and a few clusters — 
foliage a shining colour — tall and spreading. Mrs. Packard (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 36 
in. ) notes : this one improves and has nice full, colourful flowers, though they 
come one to a stem — bushy well-clothed plant. 

NEW PENNY, Min. (Moore '62). Orange-red. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 6 
in.) comments: the bright pink colouring of this miniature is eye-catching — 
a free-flowering plant. 

OKLAHOMA, H.T. (Swim & Weeks '64). Dark red. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 2 
yrs. ; 55 in. ) reports : this is a tall upright bush — very nice dark red flowers 
of exhibition quality — average production — hardy — will mildew. 'The 
nicest dark red rose in my garden' states Dr. Moyle ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) Mr. 
Patterson (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) notes: not many blooms, but they are first 
rate — some fragrance — a good dark red show rose — not subject to mildew 
as are so many others. Mr. Westbrook (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) comments: blooms 
are not attractive, no sparkle to them — bud gives promise then fails to fulfil. 

OLE, Gr. (Armstrong '64). Orange-red. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) 
reports : this variety is a profuse bloomer — long-lasting flowers, a vibrant 
colour. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 11 in.) comments: had no vigour the first 
year — slow to repeat — hope for better performance next year. Mrs. Packard 
(1 pi. ; 4 yrs.; 50 in.) notes: blooms are almost carnation-formed, but stun- 
ning — easy to grow and responds well to foliar feeding. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 
2 yrs. ; 36 in. ) writes : colour and form hold well — holly-like foliage — some 
fragrance — 'a distinctive rose'. 

ORANGE DELBARD, H.T. (Delbard '61). (Drange-red. Mr. Parker (1 pi.; 3 
yrs. ; 36 in. ) comments : bush is good, but it is a sparse bloomer — blooms 
are damaged by the weather — not a desirable variety. (Last year (5) for 
reporting this rose. ) 

ORANGE FLAME, H.T. (Meilland '62. Vermilion to orange-scarlet. Mrs. 
Packard (1 pi.; 4 yrs.; 60 in.) comments: this rose is noted for mildew — 
moved mine to south side of house, and in this heat it does not mildew and 
produces large, spectacular blooms. 

ORANGE SENSATION, Fl. (De Ruiter '61). Orange-vermilion. Mrs. Baillie 
(1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 18 in.) reports: bush was a slow grower — form and colour of 
bloom good — blooms intermittently — may improve, but up to now it is 'just 
another floribunda'. Mr. Buckley (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) observes: growth habit 
and flowers similar to 'Orange Triumph', and just as easy to grow, it would 
seem from first year's trial. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 22 in.) comments: not 



183 



a prolific bloomer by any means, but it keeps producing scarlet boutonnieres 
in the shadiest of spots. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 34 in.) notes: a most attrac- 
tive colour — continued to bloom right into the fall — a very good rose. Mr. 
Morden (1 pi. ; 3 yrs, ; 1 2 in. ) observes : bush is dwarf — slow to repeat — 
some blackspot. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) says: a good producer — 
blooms in clusters — clean foliage — slightly fragrant. Mrs. Packard ( 2 pis. ; 

1 yr. ; 30 in.) says she disliked the colour in spring and summer, halfway 
between orange and red; by October it was a true, bright orange and very 
unusual and lovely, though only about 2 inches wide. 

ORIENTAL CHARM, H.T. (Duehrsen '60). Turkey-red. With reference to 
this variety, Dr. Moyle (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) briefly reports: 'discarded'. Mrs. 
Packard (1 pi.; 6 yrs.; 70 in.) notes: easy to grow in sun or shade — produces 
flashy, poppy-like flowers that do not hold too well when cut. (Last year for 
reporting this rose. ) 

PADDY McGREDY, Fl. (McGredy '62). Deep pink. Mrs. Gallagher (6 pis.; 

2 yrs.) comments: its many small blooms like a H.T., almost red in colour, are 
very attractive — a low-growing bush which is unusual here. Mrs. Hawkins 
(1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 30 in. ) reports : a floribunda of neat H.T.-form, colour rather 
nondescript deep pink, with clean shiny foliage — apparently hardy. Mr. 
Jubien (6 pis.; 2 yrs.; 21 in.) is increasing his stock further in '67 — thinks 
colour is very marked, it would be magnificent in mass planting. Miss Mason 
(1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 18 in.) notes: flowers form singly but it is a very sparse bloomer 
— ■ perhaps next year it will come into its own. Mr. Meier (2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 32 in.) 
mentions the compact growth, which is disease-free — long-lasting blooms 
come singly — Very good'. Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 22 in.) also recom- 
mends this rose. According to Mrs. Morton (2 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 26 in.) the 
flowers of beautiful H.T.-form are long-lasting — very free-flowering — 'a 
favourite with visitors'. Mr. Parker (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 30 in.) finds the blooms of 
excellent shape, and the variety prolific. Mr. Selwood ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 30 in. ) and 
Mr. Sparling (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 22 in.) concur in general approval. 

PAINT BOX, Fl. (Dickson '63). Yellow blend. Mr. Buckley (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 
30 in.) reports: the variety was very much improved this year — very flori- 
ferous — some blooms all red, some all yellow, but greater number were yel- 
low and red in varying degrees. Mr. Jubien (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) comments: 
flowers rather round with good number of petals — continuous bloom — a 
better rose than 'Masquerade', larger blooms and more compact growth. Mr. 
Magee (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) notes: flowers are 'Masquerade' type but looked 
fine this spring — good colour contrast. Mr. Meier (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 40 in.) 
observes : an upright bush — as name indicates, bloom changes to different 
colours — repeater. 

PALM SPRINGS, Fl. (Duehrsen int. Elmer '65). Red blend. Mr. Goulding 
( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) reports : plants of this variety are vigorous and disease- 
free — prolific bloomer all through season — flowers of H.T.-form, of quite 
unusual colour. Mr. Mayer (4 pis.,; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) comments: an interesting 
floribunda if only for the fact the flowers possess a rich fruity fragrance — 
foliage glossy and a fascinating dark, reddish green when young — blooms at- 
tractive, but fade badly — 'reserve judgment'. 

PAPA MEILLAND, H.T. (Meilland int. Wheatcroft '63). Dark crimson. In 
the opinion of Mr. De Kelver (2 pis. ; 1 yr.; 54 in.) 'another dandy red' — good 
exhibition blooms come on strong stems — freely produced. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 

1 yr.; 35 in.) says: the deepest and darkest red in my garden — beautiful 
bloom — very fragrant. Mr. Jenkins (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 31 in. ) reports : produced 
some very fine blooms — good foliage — nice fragrance. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 

2 yrs.; 30 in.) comments: still performs well — a sparse bloomer, however 
flowers are beautiful and have fragrance — foliage glossy and leathery. Mr. 



184 



Magee (3 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 60 in.) notes: made very strong growth — produces 
well-formed bud — won Queen of Show at Detroit for me this spring with a 
well-shaped bloom — some mildew. Mrs. MacDonald (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) 
writes : blooms are long-lasting, hold colour well, very large — fragrance is 
outstanding. For Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 24 in. ) this variety gave a much 
better performance this year — blooms have good form, but open a little too 
quickly. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) considers the beautiful flowers of 
exhibition quality — not too freely-produced — not a vigorous grower. Dr. 
Moyle (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) mentions this is a rather stingy bloomer, but 
flowers are of fine form. Mr. Patterson (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 48 in.) finds the long- 
stemmed bloom of good form in early stages, rather loose when fully open. 
Mr. Westbrook (5 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 36 in.) writes: lots of life and sparkle to the 
blooms, which this year were produced in great quantity and superb quality 
— 'can find no fault'. 

PARASOL, H.T. (Sanday^ '64). Rich yellow. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
26 in.) comments: this variety surprised me with its good performance, hope 
it takes the winter — plant of upright growth, had some mildew — blooms 
have good form and are fragrant. 

PASCALI, H.T. (Lens '63). White. Mr. Buckley (6 pis.; 2 yrs.; 48 in.) re- 
ports: this rose produced an abundance of medium size blooms, which open 
well in water from quite tight buds — very good garden rose. Mr. Frasier 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 48 in. ) advises : tall, upright bush — lots of bloom of exhibition 
type — will hold. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 32 in.) writes: 'an elegant rose 
of great refinement' — produced with satisfying regularity — a must for those 
who like white roses. Mr. Jubien (3 pis.; 2, 3 yrs.; 23 in.) won a first prize 
with the variety this year — few blooms at a time, but it kept going — 'hard to 
beat this rose'. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) comments: displayed bushy, 
vigorous growth, disease-free foliage — better than average bloom produc- 
tion — 'good garden rose'. 'One of the best whites' in the opinion of Mr. 
LafTey (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.), bears beautifully-shaped flowers on sturdy 
stems. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 38 in.) concurs in this favourable opinion. 
Mr. McDougall ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ) finds this variety does not winter well. Mr. Meier 
(4 pis.; 1 yr. ; 48 in.) notes: excellent foliage, disease-free — heavy bloomer 
— -flowers perfect shape, only fault is they are small. Mr. Morden (2 pis.; 3 
yrs.; 33 in.) observes: medium size blooms are of good form — good repeater. 
Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 40 in.) also finds the bloom a little on the small 
side, but form is excellent. Mrs. Packard (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 40 in. ) thinks the small 
flowers are very well-formed, both bud and fully open — continuous bloomer. 
Mr. Parker ( 3 pis. ; 3 yrs. ; 48 in. ) advises : has bloomed continuously all sea- 
son — small flowers of excellent shape — better than 'Virgo'. Mr. Patterson 
(1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 40 in. ) had average bloom production from variety — form is 
fair, rather loose when open. Mr. Selwood (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) agrees the 
bloom is a little on the small side, but considers it a fine rose. Mr. Whitlock 
(2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) does not feel blooms are exhibition quality due to shape 
of petals. 

PEACHY, Min. (Moore '64). Pink with yellow blend. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 
1 yr.; 10 in.) reports: this is a miniature of rather sprawling growth — colour 
is attractive — blooms freely — some mildew . 

PEPE, H.T. (De Ruiter '62). Pink and gold with silvery reverse. This is a 
garden rose rather than an exhibition-type, in the opinion of Mr. Keenan 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 50 in. ) — growth tall and vigorous — an abundance of bloom. 
Mr. Parker (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) also reports this is a very prolific bloomer — 
flowers not large, and rather flat — 'looks like a good garden rose'. 

PERFECTA SUPERIOR, H.T. (Kordes '63). Deep pink. Mr. Collier (1 pi.; 
1 yr. ; 40 in. ) writes : this variety is floriferous — bloom identical with 'Per- 
fecta' in shape and formation, but colour not as attractive — strong healthy 



185 



growth. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) notes: 'a beautiful rose' — flowers 
freely produced — upright plant — fragrant. Mr. Goulding (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 
in.) comments: hardy, disease-free bush — free-flowering, equally handsome 
as 'Perfecta' — fragrant. Mr. Morden (3 pis.; 2, 3 yrs.; 36 in.) reports: pro- 
duces large blooms of good form and colour — repeated well — a real good 
rose. 

PERNILLE POULSEN, Fl. (Poulsen '65). Pink. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 36 
in.) reports: this is an excellent floribunda, was delighted with its perform- 
ance in first year — upright in growth, foliage clean and disease-free — blooms 
are in clusters and abundant — very fragrant. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 18 
in. ) notes : plant had poor start, but showed merit in fall — an attractive 
newcomer. 

PILLAR OF FIRE, CI. (Int. C.&P. '63). Coral-red. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
36 in. ) writes : this climber bears striking double red blooms — lovely in the 
bud and lasting over a week — blooms turn almost white before falling — 
plant has been in flower from middle of July, and is still (Oct. 15) — supposed 
to be hardy, should go to 6 feet next year. 

PINK MASTERPIECE, H.T. (Boerner '62). Light pink. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 
2 yrs.; 36 in.) finds this variety a rather sparse bloomer, although bloom is of 
exhibition quality — is tender. 

POLYNESIAN SUNSET, H.T. (Boerner '65). Orange-red. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 
1 yr. ; 43 in. ) reports : bloom of this new rose has beautiful exhibition form, but 
bush produced very few flowers this year — prefer to reserve judgment. Mr. 
Westbrook. (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 20 in.) writes: received a weak plant, and so any 
decision would be unfair — blooms produced were an intriguing colour, 
similar to 'Tanya'. Mr. Whitlock (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) states: not too out- 
standing in first year — not as good as some of the others. 

PRIDE (Fierte), H.T. (Lens '64). Deep rose-pink. Mrs. Antoft (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 
30 in.) comments: variety produced beautiful, excellently-shaped rose-pink 
flowers, on a tall well-branched bush — outstanding bloom production — 
fragrant. 

QUEEN FABIOLA, H.T. (Delbard '61). Orange-red. Mrs. Packard (1 pi.; 

1 yr. ; 34 in. ) notes : this has not done well like 'Floriade' — plant is a bit 
scrawny and mildews easily — blooms often ball; some roses need 2 years to 
become established. 

RED CHAMPAGNE, H.T. (Tantau '63). Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) 
reports : this variety produced some large blooms of good form and colour — 
slow to repeat — 'this could be a good rose'. 

ROELOF BUISMAN, H.T. (Kordes ;64). Medium red. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 

2 yrs.; 26 in.) observes: flowers of this rose were large, colour and form good 
— slow to repeat — bush not too vigorous — some blackspot. 

ROMAN HOLIDAY, Fl. (Lindquist '66). Red blend. In the opinion of Mr. 
Frasier (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) this is a floribunda everyone should have — 
nice shapely bush — lots of attractive colour clusters, which last and last — 
no disease. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 24 in.) notes: this is a quite showy blend, 
but performance was only average in first year. Mrs. Packard ( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 
28 in. ) writes : this is a very bright and deep multicolour hard to describe — 
blooms about 2 inches, in small clusters — nice compact plant. 

ROSE OF TRALEE, Fl. (McGredy '64). Rose-pink blend. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 
1 yr. ; 36 in.) reports: this is a strong, sprawling bush, useful in a hedge — 
produced many exhibition blooms — 'a must'. 'My favourite floribunda', writes 



186 



Mr. Goulding (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) — blooms come in clusters, each flower 
a miniature H.T., hold colour well — very fragrant. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
24 in. ) notes : had good growth in first year — distinctive flower — feel variety 
is worth while. Mr. Selwood (1 pi.; 1 yr.) comments: blooms in small clusters, 
are well-shaped — good foliage, disease-resistant. 

ROSEMARIN, Min. (Kordes '65). Pink blend. Mr. Magee (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 12 
in. ) writes : this is a charming new miniature with variable colour — light 
green glossy foliage — 'one of the nicest'. 

ROTOR CHAMPAGNE, H.T. (Tantau '63). Medium red. This is a good 
variety, sometimes producing bloom of exhibition quality, according to Mr. 
Magee (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 48 in. ) — well-formed medium size buds — strong- 
growing bush — needs much disbudding of side shoots. 

ROYAL HIGHNESS, H.T. (Swim & Weeks '62). Light pink. Mr. Collier (1 
pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) notes : this bush did not produce many blooms, but the few 
were all show quality — fragrant. Mr. De Kelver (2 pis.; 2, 3 yrs.; 36 in.) 
reports : variety has good form — has tendency to ball in wet weather, not 
free-blooming — not very hardy — very fragrant. Mrs. Guadagni ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 
36 in.) so far finds variety disappointing — pure colour with no shading, but 
very few blooms — balls — will give it another year. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi. ; 
3 yrs.; 29 in.) says: lovely in the bud — find 'Nobility' which is similar, a 
better producer. Mr. Jenkins (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 24 in.) observes: has excellent 
form and colour — well worth growing. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) 
comments : this is an exhibition rose, with excellent form and substance — 
needs winter protection. Dr. Lee ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) writes : my bush grew well, but 
produced exactly one flower all year and that a poor thing — however, I 
have seen good performance elsewhere. Mr. MacPherson (3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 36 
in.) is restrained; beautifully-shaped blooms of a delicate pink, but very sus- 
ceptible to blackspot — not much vigour and for that reason disappointing. In 
the opinion of Mr. Magee (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 42 in. ) one of the best light pinks — 
does not produce many blooms but each generally outstanding — high-centred 
flowers on long stems — excellent fragrance. Mr. McNally ( 2 pis. ; 1 yr. ; 30 
in. ) also considers this one of the top performers of the year — ordered 2 more. 
Mr. Miller (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 32 in.) advises: lost one by winter-kill — good 
quality buds, but am still disappointed in its too pale pink colour. Mr. Morden 
( 2 pis. ; 4 yrs. ; 38 in. ) mentions the colour ranges from pink to almost white — 
has tendency to ball with first bloom — vigorous bush. Mrs. Morrison (1 pi. ; 
3 yrs.; 33 in.) refers to the high-centred blooms and plenty of them — our dry 
season suited this plant — ' beauty in the garden'. Mrs. Morton (2 pis.; 3, 4 
yrs. ; 48 in. ) notes : one of the best — flowers large and of perfect form — 
moderate producer. Dr. Moyle (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 30 in.) says: while a stingy 
bloomer, is a real exhibition rose. This rose has not produced a dozen flowers 
this year for Mr. Patterson (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) — bloom of exhibition 
quality, but balls easily. Mr. Perrault (1 pi.; 3 yrs.) comments: it came 
through 2 rigorous winters, am satisfied. Mr. Selwood (2 pis.; 4 yrs.; 48 in.) 
observes : a moderate bloomer, but every bloom is a good one — 'a fine rose'. 
For Mr. Sparling (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) the variety has a reasonable amount of 
bloom, although it is not a vigorous grower — perfect in the bud. Mr. West- 
brook (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 50 in. ) rates this a beautiful exhibition rose, each perfect 
bloom on a long stem — 'a must'. Mr. Whitfield (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) notes: 
produces many excellent flowers, but is easily marked by weather and insects. 

RUMBA, Fl. (Poulsen '60). Yellow-orange-red. Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 
28 in. ) reports : this is a low-growing variety — small-sized blooms come in 
clusters — a little mildew — hardy. (Last year for reporting this rose.) 

RUTH HEWITT, Fl. (Norman '63). Creamy-white. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 
yrs.; 26 in. ) ^ comments : bears medium size blooms of H.T.-form — a good 
bloomer — vigorous dwarf bush — 'a good garden rose'. 



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SABINE, H.T. (Tantau '62). Deep rose. Mr. Laffey (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 42 in.) 
writes : this rose is still my No. 1 choice for fragrance — produces an abund- 
ance of beautiful blooms. Mr. Parker (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 18 in.) notes: plant, hit 
by late frost, was late to recover — blooms resemble 'Prima Ballerina' — very 
fragrant. Mr. Patterson ( 2 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 30 in. ) reports : had a fair number of 
flowers — plant clean and healthy — hardy — 'will be an exhibition type I 
believe'. Mr. Westbrook (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 50 in.) enthuses: tall, upright grower, 
disease-free and hardy — magnificently-formed fantastically-scented blooms 
which last for ages on the bush without fading, and you have one of the top 
five — 'you cannot go wrong with this one'. 

SAMBA, Fl. (Kordes '64). Yellow and red. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 19 
in.) writes: this attractive yellow-flushed-red was acquired because when 
seen in the field it appeared to be a sturdier, better 'Circus' — performance 
was just fair, but possibly one should not try to coax roses in semi-shade! Mr. 
Magee (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 32 in.) admits variety has a brilliant colour, but prefers 
'Rumba' for overall effect. 

SARATOGA, Fl. (Boerner int. J.&P. '64). White. Mr. De Kelver reports: 
sorry, my bush was winter-killed. Mr. Frasier ( 2 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 30 in. ) notes : a 
spreading bush with lots of bloom — like it better than 'Iceberg'. Mr. Jubien 
(6 pis; 1, 2, 3 yrs.) advises : have added to my stock again — 'it's a good rose'. 
Dr. Lea (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ) considers this an excellent new white — very floriferous 
— this one is always in bloom. Still the favourite white of Miss Mason (1 pi. ; 
3 yrs.; 30 in.) — does not produce as many blooms as 'Iceberg', but I prefer 
the off-white colour. Mr. Parker (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) states: has been poor 
in first year, may do better next. Mrs. Pa ton (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 18 in.) comments: 
this was a sparse bloomer and late, still in flower at mid-November — appears 
quite hardy here. Mr. Selwood (2 pis.; 2, 3 yrs.) observes: a good white but 

1 prefer 'Iceberg'. Mr. Westbrook (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 20 in.) is disappointed: plant 
has deteriorated each year — takes up more room than it can pay for. The 
writer (2 pis.; 3 yrs.) has had a similar experience — plants have had no 
vigour — have discarded. 

SCARLET GEM, Min. (Meilland int. C.&P. '61). Orange-scarlet. Mrs. 
Morton (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 9 in.) finds this a sturdy little miniature — is free- 
flowering and holds colour well. 

SCARLET QUEEN ELIZABETH, Fl. (Dickson '63). Mr. Buckley (30 pis.; 1, 

2 yrs. ) reports : a new bed of 25 plants was added to our rose garden this year 
and were much more vigorous than last year's new plants, all plants flourished; 
colour is not too intense and the blooms are somewhat sparse, but variety 
seemed to stand up better this year — should prove worthy of further trial. 
Mr. MacPherson (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 40 in. ) comments : the abundant blooms hold 
their colour well in rain — repeats well — 'one of the better floribundas. Mr. 
Meier (4 pis.; 1 yr.; 60 in.) notes: this is strong-growing and disease-free — 
striking scarlet colour — moderate bloomer. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 1 yr.) 
observes : plant of tall, bushy growth, well-foliaged — colouring is good, but 
blooms not as well-formed as 'Queen Elizabeth', no comparison as between 
the 2 varieties. Mr. Parker (3 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 36 in.) also finds the colour 
striking — seems a vigorous grower. Variety was a very stingy producer for 
Mr. Westbrook (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 40 in. ) — disappointing in all respects. Mr. 
Whitlock (1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 60 in. ) on the contrary says : has held its own grown 
next to 'Queen Elizabeth', from the start — though form of bloom is not as 
good and has fewer petals. 

SCENTED AIR, H.T. (Dickson '64). Salmon-pink. Miss Mason^l pi.; 1 yr.; 
37 in.) likes the very attractive bloom on this new variety which has good 
exhibition form — particularly fragrant. 



188 



SCHOOL GIRL, L.C. (McGredy '64). Orange-apricot. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 
2 yrs.) reports: variety has shown good growth — free-blooming, definitely 
recurrent — flowers have good form and colour is attractive — drew favour- 
able comments from all visitors — as a large-flowering climber it requires 
extra winter protection in this area, which I gave it. 

SEA PEARL, Fl. (Dickson '64). Shrimp shaded peach and cream. Mrs. 
Hawkins (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 32 in.) writes: 'I urge everyone to order this choice 
variety — it is one of the most charming combinations of colour plus form, as 
yet — blooms in clusters — medium green, healthy foliage. Mr. Jubien (6 
pis. 1, 2 yrs.; 34 in.) reports: this rose is much like a H.T., with long stems, 
blooms exceptionally long-lasting — 'it really is a knockout, have enlarged 
planting.' Miss Mason (4 pis.; 1 yr.; 48 in.) thinks it is perhaps a little tall 
for a floribunda, but bears beautifully-shaped buds on long stems — recommends 
it without hesitation. Mrs. MacDonald (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) comments: 
growth is vigorous — well-shaped blooms are large, long-lasting. Mr. Morden 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 42 in. ) observes : its small blooms of H.T.-f orm are long-lasting 
and good colour — it is doubtful if this bush should be classed as floribunda 

— will increase. Mr. Morin (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) advises : my bush came on 
slowly, later produced some very nice flowers — no fragrance. Mr. Patterson 
(1 pi.; 2 yrs.) notes: continued to develop, produced more blooms this year 

— only fault, not enough of them. 

SENECA QUEEN, H.T. (Boerner '65). Apricot-pink. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 
yd.; 24 in.) comments: growth of this new variety was weak this first year — 
plant bears a rather attractive bud. 

SENIOR PROM, H.T. (H. Brownell '64). Light red. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 
36 in.) reports: the new plant was slow coming in spring and summer, but 
made up for it in early fall — lots of plum-red blooms, which were long- 
lasting — average foliage — no fragrance. 

SHANNON, H.T. (McGredy '65). Rose-red. Mr. Collier (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 
in.^ notes: bloom of this variety is of nice form — upright, healthy plant, 
foliage quite attractive. Mr. Frasier (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 38 in.) observes: a very 
nice pink, with exhibition bloom. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 40 in.) reports: 
blooms are large and if disbudding is practiced, can be used on show table — 
growth very vigorous — bloom is profuse. Mr. Laffey (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) 
feels he may have received a weak plant, since it has shown nothing in first 
year. 

SHE, Fl. (Dickson '62). Orange-red. Mrs. Antoft (10 pis.; 2 yrs.; 28 in.) 
reports : this bush grows vigorously in a dwarf fashion — flowers are freely 
produced all season, colour deepening with age. Miss Mason ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 36 
in.) comments: variety produces medium size bloom of attractive colour — 
an average bloomer — disease-free. Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 33 in.) advises: 
plant gave a good performance, same as last year — a good garden rose. 

SHIRALEEj H.T. (Dickson '65). A most unusual colour of saffron yellow, 
flushed marigold, is the description of this new variety by Mr. Whitlock (1 pi. ; 
1 yr.; 30 in.) — blooms are rather small and not exhibition quality — the 
number will make it a garden rose of much charm. Mr. Westbrook (1 pi.; 
1 yr.; 30 in.) reports: received a very weak plant which was nursed back to 
health and paid its bill with beautiful blooms — so beautiful I have ordered 
4 more bushes — with robust plants this should be a really outstanding rose. 

SILVER TIPS, Min. (Moore '61). Pink. Mrs. Antoft (8 pis.; 2 yrs.; 8 in.) 
comments: blooms of this variety are more abundant than on any other rose 
in this class — they are extremely double, with narrow pink petals with silver 
tips — very fragrant. 

189 



SIMON BOLIVAR, H.T. (Armstrong '66). Orange-red. Mrs. Packard (2 
pis. ; 1 yr. ; 42 in. ) reports : these are vigorous, upright, fast-growing plants, a 
bit thorny — can't tell yet whether blooms will have quite the exhibition 
quality of 'Aztec' — good bloomer and seems to improve. (One of the best at 
our big 7-acre Rose Garden at L.A.) 

SIMONE H.T. (Mallerin '61). Mauve. Mr. De Kelver (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 28 in.) 
does not consider this an attractive mauve — has large flowers, free-blooming, 
but with weak stems — foliage is better than the flower. Mr. Mayer (5 pis.; 

5 yrs. ; 36 in.) comments: still have these roses — while colour is interesting, 
lavender tends to become a washed-out pink in hot weather — blooms are 
large and fragrant, but necks are weak — there are better lavenders. (Last 
year (5) for reporting this rose.) 

SINCERA, H.T. (Camprubi '63). White. Mr. Selwood (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 40 in.) 
briefly notes : foliage of this variety was subject to mildew in a bad year — 
'has its moments'. 

SMALL TALK, Fl. (Swim '63). Yellow. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 20 in.) 
observes: this is a dwarf, attractive floribunda that is a foreground plant of 
merit. 

SONG OF PARIS, H.T. (Armstrong '65). Mauve. A fairly good variety in 
this colour class, in the opinion of Mr. Magee (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 42 in. ) — a 
strong-growing bush. 

SOPRANO, H.T. (Lens '61). Vermilion. Mrs. Packard (1 pi.; 4 yrs.; 50 in.) 
notes : this variety is still so beautiful, and here is far superior to 'Super Star' 
— foliage absolutely healthy — blooms are very glamorous. (Said to be very 
good in New Zealand) . 

SOUTHERN BELLE, H.T. (Great Western '66). Two-toned pink. A vigor- 
ous, upright grower here, writes Mrs. Packard ( 2 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 60 in. ) — has 
few thorns and very healthy foliage — a little the type of 'Comtesse Vandal'. 

SOUTH SEAS, H.T. (Int. J.&P. '61). Coral-pink. Mr. Collier (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 
24 in. ) is disappointed with this rose — produced very little bloom and none 
of quality — 'will throw this out without further trial'. Mr. Goulding (2 pis.; 
2 yrs. ; 46 in. ) reports : very tall-growing bush — quite free-flowering — blooms 
large and exhibition quality — maintains colour well. Mrs. Hawkins ( 2 pis. ; 
1, 2 yrs.; 23 in.) is cautious: one plant died, replaced it — survivor just doesn't 
want to perform in this climate. Mr. Morden (3 pis.; 2, 3 yrs.; 32 in.) advises 
the variety was not quite as good this year — blooms are long-lasting — slow 
to repeat this season and bush did not attain height of previous years. Mrs. 
Packard (1 pi.; 5 yrs.; 50 in.) calls this the most glamorous of all pink 
roses — points out it often takes time to become established — needs heat 
and sun. Mr. White (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 42 in.) observes: a vigorous grower — 
blooms are attractive, free-flowering — hardy (Manitoba). (Last year (5) for 
reporting this rose. ) 

STARINA, Min. (Meilland '65) . # Reddish-orange. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 

6 in.) reports: this is a lovely miniature, but a poor grower in its first year 
here — has beautiful exhibition bloom and pure colour. 

SUMMER SONG, Fl. (Dickson '62). Vivid orange and lemon-yellow. This 
is a bright dwarf variety which resembles 'Golden Slippers', writes Mr. 
Parker (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 18 in.) — free-flowering. 

SUMMER SUNSHINE, H.T. (Armstrong '62). Deep yellow. Mrs. Antoft 
(2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 22 in.) writes: plants received were inferior, but the few deep 
yellow roses produced were of outstanding quality — shall wait another year. 



190 



Mr. Bowles ( 3 pis. ; 2 yrs. ; 40 in. ) considers this a very promising yellow — 
strong, vigorous bush — long-lasting blooms — has to be watched for mildew. 
Mr. De Kelver (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 36 in.) states: 'this is the best yellow I have 
seen' — very free-flowering, blooms long-lasting and non-fading — Oct. 8 one 
plant still has blooms on it. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 20 in.) comments: 
has languished through the last season — tops in colour and form, but not 
vigorous. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 26 in.) reports: did not perform as well 
this year, may be it did not like our winter — hope for better results next year, 
as this is a yellow we need in our garden — average bloom production — 
some mildew. Mr. Laffey (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) states: 'my best yellow, prefer 
it to 'King's Ransom' ' — variety behaved much better this year. Miss Mason 
(2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 32 in.) also considers this by far the best yellow — better than 
'Isobel Harkness' — beautiful clear yellow, long-lasting flowers. Mr. Patterson 
(1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) is more restrained : 'I feel this is a weakling' — one plant did 
not survive, the other is on canina so will keep it for another year, if it lives 
that long. Mr. Selwood (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 40 in.) observes: one of the best 
yellows — vigorous plant with good foliage. Mr. Westbrook ( 5 pis. ; 1 , 2 yrs. ; 
30 in. ) notes : an upright grower with healthy foliage and excellent bloom — 
non-fading exhibition type — 'hard to beat this one'. Mr. White ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 
36 in.) thinks the name is apt, it is a gem. Mr. Whitlock (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 
in. ) agrees : a very good exhibition rose. 

SUN SPOT, Fl. (Fisher '65). Yellow. This was a fair yellow floribunda in 
its first year performance, writes Mr. Magee (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) — nothing 
distinctive. 

SWARTHMORE, H.T. (Meilland '63). Pink blend. Mrs. Antoft (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 
30 in. ) reports : this is a very good rose-bed flower with darker edges — one 
of the most admired in our gardens — vigorous, upright bush. Mr. Keenan 
(1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) comments: this is a very strong grower, healthy — am not 
exactly fond of how it performs or its colour — seems to be an exhibition rose 

— next year will tell the tale. Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 32 in.) states: plant 
produced few blooms of exhibition form — very slow to repeat — susceptible 
to mildew. Mrs. Packard (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 40 in. ) notes : this is not for coastal 
areas — balls, and just awful — giving it to a friend in hot desert. Mr. 
Patterson (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 40 in.) observes: had fair number of blooms, and 
looked like exhibition type, but due to heat did not develop perfectly — believe 
this will be a favourite. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 40 in. ) finds it usually an 
exhibition rose, but sometimes is spoiled by smoky outer petals. 

SWEET AFTON, H.T. (Armstrong '64). Mr. Frasier (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 60 in.) 
writes: this is a tall, upright plant with lots of light pink to almost white 
blooms — hardy, no disease — 'a nice rose'. Mr. Laffey (1 pi.; lyr. ; 32 in.) 
notes: is similar to 'Royal Highness', but maybe not as good — will wait 
another year. Mr. Magee (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 60 in.) finds it a strong grower 

— blooms rather loose, can be attractive — inferior to 'Royal Highness' and 
'Memoriam'. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 50 in.) reports: blooms are not ex- 
hibition form, but very good — average flower production — fragrant. Mrs. 
Packard (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 80 in.) comments: out in a good sunny spot it is 
terrific — one of the most fragrant — can be exhibition at times. Mr. West- 
brook (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) advises: not an exhibition type — makes a good 
garden rose in spite of poor repeat blooming. 

SWEET VIVIEN, Fl. (Raffel int. Port Stockton Nursery '63) . Pink and white. 
Mrs. Packard (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 24 in.) writes: should have better distribution, 
as this rose is one of the most unusual and loveliest of the floribundas, so dainty 
and clean — foliage is dark and absolutely healthy — everyone 'falls' for it. 

TELSTAR, Fl. (Gandy '63). Orange to orange-buff. Mrs. Antoft (12 pis.; 
1, 2 yrs.; 28 in.) writes: this rose is possibly the most charming of this class 



191 



of multi-coloured floribundas, which are flushed scarlet with age — it is free- 
flowering — upright and vigorous growth. Mrs. Hawkins (2 pis.; 2 yrs. ; 22 
in.) notes: the flowers of 8 petals are arranged attractively to make a very 
distinctive rose — compact healthy plant. 

THANKSGIVING, H.T. (Warriner int. Howard '62). Red blend. Mr. Bishop 
(3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 36 in.) reports: this variety had a veritable harvest of blooms 
in June, but was sparse in second flush — bronze colour much admired. Mrs. 
Packard ( 3 pis. ; 5 yrs. ; 90 in. ) comments : while generally a background rose 
it can be very stunning — most unusual colour, so rich — no thorns, healthy 
foliage. 

THE FARMER'S WIFE, Fl. (Boerner int. J.&P. '62). Sunrise pink. Mrs. 
Hawkins (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) comments: this tall, healthy plant produced 
attractive blooms of bright pink — a good producer, it is not however par- 
ticularly elegant in manner of 'Sea Pearl'. 

TIKI, Fl. (McGredy '64). Light shell-pink. Mr. Collier (1 pi; 1 yr.; 30 in.) 
reports: this plant has bloomed continuously since July 20, at writing (Oct. 
20) still in bloom — slight fragrance. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 38 in.) 
comments: a good floribunda, and colour is a pleasant change from the 
quantity of flamboyant colours we have had recently — growth is vigorous — 
blooms of good form, floriferous. 

TONI LANDERS, Fl. (Poulsen '61). Light tangerine. Mr. Spencer (2 pis.; 
3 yrs.; 48 in.) reports: flowers of this rose are semi-double borne in clusters, 
petals somewhat curled and pointed — stand out in my garden of bright 
colours — blooms constantly all season — some fragrance — 'am quite satis- 
fied'. (Last year (5) for reporting this rose.) 

TRADE WIND, H.T. (Von Abrams '64) . Maroon with silver reverse. Mrs. 
Packard ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 50 in. ) warns : this variety must be placed carefully, or 
colour is ruined by glowing orange-reds — has large well-formed flowers, not 
quite enough, as yet. 

TRAVIATA, H.T. (Meilland '63). # Red blend. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 
40 in. ) writes he is very satisfied with this healthy and strong bush — a very 
attractive colour blend. Mrs. Packard (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 60 in.) notes: a very 
leggy, spreading, awkward plant — when weather is right it is most unusual 
and lovely. 

ULSTER QUEEN, Fl. (McGredy '60). Mr. Buckley (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 24 in.) 
comments : a good bright golden yellow, fading to rose-pink — this variety 
probably will not last too long in favour. 

UNCLE WALTER, H.T. (McGredy '63). Crimson-scarlet. Mrs. Antoft (8 
pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 48 in.) reports: this variety had very good flower production 
— tall, healthy bush — blooms beautiful in colour and substance — fragrant. 
Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 50 in.) writes: a truly rugged bush, Uncle Walter 
must have been a tough physical specimen — needs plenty of room — bloom 
exhibition quality — fragrant. Mr. Frasier ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 60 in. ) is restrained : 
did not have many blooms, but were nice — do not like foliage at all — not 
recommended. Mr. Goulding (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 50 in. ) also is disappointed in this 
plant and will discard — too few blooms — sprawling and unruly bush, with 
many weak and blind stems. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 52 in.) comments: 
it required 3 years and 2 moves of the plant before it really took hold — an 
upright grower this year — ■ blooms are exhibition form, not too many. Mr. 
Laffey (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 48 in.) states: very vigorous growth but few blooms — 
will wait. Mr. Meier (3 pis.; 1 yr.; 72 in.) observes: this is too tall for an 
H.T. — needs protection from mildew — 'a beautiful rose'. Mr. Morden ( 1 
pL; 1 yr.; 32 in.) also was disappointed: not even one bloom was produced — 



192 



bush showed very little growth till fall — will keep one more year. Mr. 
Parker (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 60 in.) notes: very tall — few blooms this year, but 
exhibition quality — colour very good — lacks fragrance. Mr. Selwood (1 pi. ; 

2 yrs.; 60 in.) points out variety is actually a low climber — only fair pro- 
ducer for amount of growth. 

VAGABONDE, Fl. (Lens '62). Salmon-pink. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 2 yrs.) 
writes: we enjoyed the sweet shrimp-toned buds and blossoms of this charm- 
ing variety before it proved of delicate constitution as well, and passed on. 

VARIETY CLUB, Fl. (McGredy '65). Yellow strongly veined rose-red. Mr. 
Bishop (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) considers this rose a worthy progeny of 'Circus', 
with blooms of slightly better form — a good bedding rose of satisfactory 
habits. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 26 in.) notes: a variety of medium to short 
growth — lots of small bicoloured blooms — worth having — no disease. 

VERA DALTON, Fl. (Norman '61). Camelia-rose. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 3 
yrs.; 30 in.) writes: this is a favourite because of the soft coral-rose blooms 
of pleasing form, produced singly and in clusters — is a blackspotter deluxe, 
but survives in spite of it. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 2, 4 yrs.; 33 in.) comments: 
rose bears delightful flowers in clusters — vigorous bushy growth, foliage glossy 
and healthy — 'in my garden an outstanding floribunda'. Mrs. Morton (1 pi. ; 

3 yrs. ; 28 in. ) notes : free-bloomer, of H.T.-type — healthy and hardy. Mrs. 
Packard (2 pis.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) observes: a lovely rose when the weather is 
right, and much larger than most floribundas — very good texture and clean 
medium pink. 

VIENNA CHARM, H.T. (Kordes '63). Coppery-orange. Mrs. Antoft (10 
pis.; 1 yr.; 28 in.) reports: this is a new and exciting colour in H.T.s, indeed 
a delightful sight with the abundant, large perfectly-shaped blooms on a tall 
bush — fragrant — but we are hoping for a mild winter as it belongs in a 
colour class that does not seem sugged. Mr. Bishop (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) com- 
ments: had the misfortune to lose 2 plants, purchased in fall of '65 and 
buried in trench for winter (only loss out of 80 imported) — survivor was 
slow of growth — sparse blooms of exhibition quality — am interested in how 
it stands up to winter outside. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 48 in.) notes: lots 
of bloom — no disease — hardy. Mr. Goulding (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) advises: 
performed well in second year — not too free bloomer, but flowers lovely 
colour and well-formed. Mr. Keenan (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 33 in.) feels this rose 
is worth growing for the colour of the bloom — needs considerable care — 
subject to slight attacks of mildew — fragrant. Mr. LafTey (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 
42 in. ) considers this an outstanding rose — more prolific this year — large 
blooms on sturdy stems, beautiful colour — 'one of the best'. Mr. Magee (3 
pis; 1 yr.; 36 in.) reports: budded 3 plants on multiflora and had good growth 
on them — a tender variety, but beautiful and the best in its colour. Mr. 
McDougall (1 pi.; 1 yr.) states: did not winter — will not repeat. Mr. 
Morden (2 pis.; 1, 2 yrs.; 40 in.) writes: produced few large blooms of ex- 
hibition form — colour is unusual — slow to repeat. Mrs. Morton (1 pi. ; 
2 yrs. ; 40 in. ) observes : tall upright growth, well-foliaged — bloom beautiful 
in bud but opens quickly. Mrs. Packard (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) notes: showing 
a little improvement in the flower, but there are too few — foliage is very 
ugly. Mr. Parker (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) says: the variety did not do well for 
me — very few blooms and poor growth — however, have seen excellent plants 
blooming yell in others gardens. Mr. Sparling (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) was 
satisfied with the first year performance of his bush — blooms of a most inter- 
esting colour and well-formed, but very few. 

VIOLET CARSON, Fl. (McGredy '63). Peach-pink silvery reverse. Mr. 
Frasier (2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 34 in.) comments: this rose had lots of exhibition 
bloom — tall upright bush — a very nice floribunda. Mr. Keenan (1 pi. ; 2 



193 



yrs. ; 33 in.) reports: continued its good performance in second year — buds of 
H.T.-type, in good clusters — sturdy growth. Mr. Magee (1 pi. ; 3 yrs.; 36 in.) 
says : very beautiful blooms are H.T.-f orm — one of the best. 'One of my 
favourites,' writes Mr. Morin (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 30 in. ) — blooms come in clusters, 
stand sun and rain, continuous — no fragrance. Mr. Parker (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 18 
in.) confesses: this lady does not get on well with me, will not grow or bloom! 

WAR DANCE, Gr. (Swim '61). Orange-scarlet. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 3 yrs.; 
24 in. ) writes : 'in third year shows further strengthening of weak necks, and I 
am happy I persevered with this variety' — blooms are excellent and long- 
lasting. Mr. Frasier (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 48 in.) notes: variety has weak necks, but 
lots of bloom — a little mildew. 

WEISSE SPARRIESHOOP, S. (Kordes '63). White. Mr. Magee (1 pi.; 2 
yrs. ; 48 in. ) comments : this is a white sport of 'Sparrieshoop' — blooms turn 
pinkish with age — seems quite satisfactory. 

WESTERN SUN, H.T. (Poulsen '65). Deep yellow. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 1 
yr.; 30 in.) writes: this offspring of 'Buccaneer' is the best yellow I've seen, 
and on the basis of first year's performance, can be highly recommended. Mr. 
De Kelver (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 30 in.) reports: a large, deep non-fading yellow of 
good form, but had very few blooms — maybe next year. Mr. Frasier ( 3 pis. ; 

1 yr. ; 28 in.) notes: short-growing bush — very nice yellow, but very short 
of bloom, and what there was, not of exhibition form. Mr. Keenan (1 pi.; 1 
yr. ; 24 in.) comments: showed good growth in first year, with reasonable 
number of flowers — a good yellow, has possibilities — another year will give 
me a better viewpoint. Mr. Magee (3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 18 in.) found growth in 
first year disappointing — has deep yellow colour. Mr. Morden (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 
16 in. ) similarly reports : showed no vigour in first year — very slow to repeat. 

WESTMINSTER, H.T. (Robinson '60). Cherry and red bicolour. Mrs. 
An toft (4 pis.; 1 yr.; 20 in.) notes: this variety bears very attractive large 
flowers in good supply and form — very fragrant. Mrs. Hawkins ( 1 pi. ; 3 yrs. ; 
22 in.) rates this one of the best bicolours — in 2 seasons the production of 
shapely blooms, some of exhibition quality, was quite fantastic. Mr. Meier (2 
pis. ; 2 yrs. ) points out variety is very subject to mildew — produces large 
blooms in moderate quantity. Mr. Parker (4 pis.; 4 yrs.; 30 in.) also notes 
susceptibility to mildew — has large blooms of excellent shape — flowers loose 

— free bloomer. (Last year for reporting this rose.) 

WHITE DIAN, Min. (Moore '65). Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 15 in.) writes: 
this is an exceptionally free-flowering miniature — blooms singly and in 
clusters, holds colour well — formation of bloom is often compared with a 
carnation — a favourite. 

WHITE PRINCE, H.T. (Von Abrams int. P.&D. '61). Mr. MacPherson (3 
pis. ; 1 yr. ; 28 in. ) reports : my bush had few flowers so far — they are of good 
form and stand up in wet weather better than most whites — growth is 
spindly — 'the only white rose that likes my thin soil is 'Frau Karl Druschki'.' 

WISBECH GOLD, H.T. (McGredy '64). Deep golden-yellow, edged pinkish- 
red. Mr. Bishop (3 pis.; 1 yr. ; 20 in.) reports: this is an excellent low- 
growing bush — prolific, with attractive blooms until they are full-blown, 
when centres are rather ugly — a good bedding rose. Mr. Goulding (2 pis.; 

2 yrs. ; 24 in. ) comments : flowers are most interesting colour and well-formed 

— bloom is sparse — a low-growing plant. Mr. Keenan (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 20 in. ) 
notes : dark glossy foliage on low bushy growth, so far healthy — blooms are 
unusual colour — quite floriferous — hope it takes our winter. With Mrs. 
Morton (1 pi.; 1 yr. ; 14 in.) growth of new bush was poor and blooms sparse, 
need another year to evaluate. Mr. Selwood (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 24 in.) also finds 



194 



variety not too vigorous, requires extra feeding — bloom has been of excellent 
form and colour, a nice deep yellow edged pink. 

WOBURN ABBEY, Fl. (Sidley & Cobley '62). Orange with yellow and red 
shades. Mr. Bishop (1 pi.; 4 yrs.; 24 in.) reports: this variety bears most 
attractive, delicately-shaped blooms which have been much admired — prone 
to mildew. Mr. Buckley (25 pis.; 2 yrs.) considers this a very striking orange 
floribunda, with perfectly-formed flowers in clusters of 8 to 15 — colour fades 
to coral — new plants set out this year made a very effective bed. Mrs. 
Gallagher (1 pi.; 1 yr.) thinks this unusual colour combination of orange, 
yellow and tangerine gives it an intriguing look — fragrant — rather slow 
repeating this year. Mr. Frasier ( 1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 36 in. ) advises : a tall, spreading 
bush — lots of nice bloom clusters — some mildew. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi. ; 2 
yrs.) relates: nothing the first season, a few beautiful orange-apricot clusters 
of bloom the second, and then 'fini' — shall try again with a native-grown 
plant with more vigour(?). Dr. Lea (1 pi.; 1 yr.) states: had good bloom 
production, particularly in autumn — this is an excellent rose. Miss Mason 
(1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 31 in. ) says : vigorous grower with good foliage — attractive 
colour — prone to mildew. Mrs. MacDonald (1 pi. ; 2 yrs.; 18 in.) comments: 
brings a very bright touch in the garden — produced large long-lasting clusters 
of bloom — good fragrance — foliage glossy-green — better in late season. 
Was a very heavy bloomer this year for Mr. Morden (1 pi.; 3 yrs.; 29 in.) — 
in clusters of good form. Mr. Morin (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) writes: did not do 
well for me — very few blooms, but nice colour. Mr. Parker ( 1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 
in.) advises: was slow starting, but made better growth late in season. Mr. 
Selwood (1 pi. ; 2 yrs. ) notes : an average grower — continuity of bloom can 
be improved by judicious pruning. 'One of the best floribundas I have' says 
Mr. Sparling (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) — good bloomer, outstanding colour — 
quite vigorous. Mr. Spencer (1 pi. ; 1 yr. ; 24 in. ) emphasizes that the colour 
stands out among other so-called orange roses — bloomed well first year — 
moderate fragrance. Mr. Westbrook (3 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 20 in.) rates this 'a 
very satisfying rose', with which the writer (1 pi. ; 4 yrs. ) heartily concurs. 

WORLD'S FAIR SALUTE, H.T. (Morey int. J.&P. '64). Deep red. Mr. 
Buckley (25 pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) reports: this is a variety with perfectly- 
formed flowers and excellent foliage — second year observance on the old plants 
would suggest it is still among the best exhibition-type varieties — opens very 
well in water from fairly tight buds. 

YELLOW BANTAM, Min. (Moore '60). Primrose-yellow. Mrs. Morton (1 
pi. ; 2 yrs. ; 5 in. ) calls this 'a real miniature' — bears tiny H.T.-shaped blooms 
with miniature foliage. (Last year for reporting this rose.) 

YELLOW DOLL, Min. (Moore '62). Mrs. Antoft (5 pis.; 2 yrs.; 8 in.) com- 
ments : flowers are large, of perfect H.T.-form — colour fades slightly in the 
sun, when open — a continuous bloomer. Mr. Frasier (2 pis.; 1 yr. ; 12 in.) 
notes plant has lots of nice yellow blooms. Mrs. Morton (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 13 in.) 
also refers to the shapely blooms — variety is free-flowering — bushy in growth. 

YELLOW QUEEN ELIZABETH, Gr. (Vlaeminck int. Fryer's Nursery '64). 
Mrs. Antoft (2 pis.; 1 yr.; 30 in.) states: this variety seems to be a very nice 
sort of 'Queen Elizabeth', but will reserve judgment for a year. Mr. Parker (2 
pis.; 2 yrs.; 40 in.) reports: it is slow to repeat — blooms fade — 'am not 
impressed'. 

ZAMBRA, Fl. (Meilland '61 ).^ Nasturtium-red. Mr. Bishop (5 pis.; 1 yr.; 18 
in. ) comments : blooms of this variety are very colourful — a low bush — 
would be very attractive if planted en masse in a bed or border. Mr. Frasier 
(2 pis.; 2 yrs.; 36 in.) notes: a spreading bush — lots of clusters, bloom opens 
very fast. Mrs. Hawkins (1 pi.; 1 yr.; 18 in.) reports: new plant marked time 



195 



in first year — again it was the orange-yellow colour which attracted. Mr. 
Keenan (2 pis.; 1, 3 yrs.; 20 in.) observes: the old plant did very well this 
year, probably liked the warmth — had plenty of blooms of an unusual colour 
— worth growing. Miss Mason (1 pi.; 2 yrs.; 22 in.) likes the eye-catching 
colour — a good grower — an excellent addition to any floribunda collection. 
Mrs. Packard (3 pis.; 2 yrs.; 30 in.) writes: am putting in more of these, so 
far superior to 'Golden Slippers' — blooms last for days as cut flowers and 
keep fresh in texture. 



196 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Acti-dione P. M. !....'. 212 

Brookdale-Kingsway Nursery 205 

Canada Packers Ltd 219 

Canadian' Nursery Trades Association .... 223 

Chevron Chemicals Ltd 206 

Chipman Chemicals Ltd 209 

Cocoa Bean Shells .... 213 

John Connon Nurseries 217 

C. A. Cruickshank Ltd 199 

Cyanamid of Canada Ltd 216 

Cygon "... 216 

Dixon-Reid Co. Ltd 217 

Duplate Canada Ltd. 198 

Eddie's Nurseries 207 > 

Ellesmere Nurseries Ltd 221 

Elndean Nurseries 224 

Gardal 2.18 

Garden Club of Toronto ..." 201 

Green Cross Products 218 

R. Harkness & Co. Ltd , 215 

Hosemaster Products 2,00 

A. H. Howard Chemical Company 212 

John A. Huston Co. Ltd. 210 

Geo. Keith & Sons Ltd 199 

V. Kraus Nurseries 215 

McConnell Nursery Co. Ltd 204 

Modern Rose Nursery 203 

Carl Pallek & Son Nurseries ./.J .. 222 

Reg. Perkins' Rose Farm 201 

W. H. Perron & Co. Ltd 205 

Phaltan '. : 206 

Pickering Nurseries Reg'd 199 

Pinehaven Nurseries 225 

Plant Products Co. Ltd ... 211 

Queenswood House Ltd. 202 , 1 

Ra-Pid-Gro Corporation * 208 

Ridgway Potteries Cariada Ltd. , 220 . 

Sheridan Nurseries Ltd ... 214 

Shur-Gain Rose Food 219 

Simpson's 201 

So-Green Fertilizer 203 

Solty Garden Centre 203 

A. Teolis Ltd. 224 

True Temper Garden Tools f 207 

Unionville Nurseries 224 

Vigoro ; 222 

Weedrite 209 

White Rose Nurseries Ltd 226 

Wilkinson Sword 210 

Wilson'-s Pesticides -22 1 - 

197 



TWINDOW 



helps maintain even temperatures 
all winter long 




Twindow* helps keep the temperature in this house at a com- 
fortable, even level. It can do the same in your home too! 
You see Twindow is made up of two pieces of glass separated 
by an imprisoned layer of dry, non-circulating air. 

This makes it an excellent insulator against winter cold. With 
Twindow, draughts are a thing of the past, even close to the 
window. No more 'fogged over' windows either, for Twindow 
virtually eliminates condensation. 

Twindow is surprisingly economical to install too. For complete 
details, contact your local Canadian Pittsburgh branch. 

•T.M.Reg'd 




198 



ROLCUT 
SECATEURS 

The ideal pruners for Roses. 
Made in England, awarded 
Silver Medal, National Rose 
Society 

RA-PID-GRO 

Amazing new discovery. The 
original foliage-feeding 
fertilizer 

Phone or Write for Catalogue 

C. A. CRUICKSHANK LTD. 

Accessories for Rose growers 

BULBS PLANTS SEEDS 

1015 Mount Pleasant Road 
HUdson 8-8292 Toronto 12 



OUR 101 ST YEAR 

KEITH'S 
SEEDS 

Specialists in Fine Seeds 
Flowers 
Vegetables 

also 

Holland's finest bulbs 

Send today for our 1967 catalogue 

Geo. Keith & Sons Ltd. 

7582 Yonge St. 
Thornhill, Ontario 
Phone 889-7645 



High Quality Roses 



True-to-name varieties. Old-onss such as our ancestors grew 
(dating back as far as prior to 1300), as well as recent, and 
some of the newest varieties, including MISS CANADA. 

Visitors welcome to the rosefield from July through October. 

Catalogue sent on request. 

Pickering Nurseries Reg'd. 

Hwy. No. 2, Pickering, Ont. 



199 



Made Right . . . 



Styled Right 



Priced Right 



HOS EM ASTER! 





562 — SUPREME NOZZLE 

Heavy duty; attractive. 
Fully adjustable. Order 
#562-C for Carded; #562- 
TFC for Threaded Front 
Carded. 



953 — ROTftHNG 
SPRINKLER 

Full circle impulse, 
tor professional 
lawn care. Works 
well on all pres- 
sures. Adj. from 
20 ft. to 70 ft. 



984-FS— IMPULSE FERTI- 
LIZER-SPRINKLER 

Sprinkles and/or feeds the 
lawn. Features a #965 
Head, Air-O-Matic Meter- 
ing Control. Fully adjust- 
able. 



484— INSECTICIDE 
SPRAYER 

Metering slide controls ratio 
of concentrate in water 
sprayed. Features like 
#362; fits standard hose. 




TT-65 — THUM-TROL® NOZZLE 

For those who want the very best. 
A push of thumb-slide controls 
flow. Quality made; chrome 
plated. 



362— AIR-O-MATIC 
SUPREME SPRAYER 

Disc control for 
spraying any garden 
liquid concentrate. No 
pre-mixing. Cap. to 
10 gal. of finished 
spray. 




986 — Hosemaster 
AQUA-WHIRL 
LAWN SPRINKLER 



489 — Hosemaster Lifetime 
Fiberglass HOSE REEL 



with Wall Bracket. 



CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVES 

CONTINENTAL AGENCIES 

322 Howland Ave. Toronto 4, Ont. 




KNOWN AROUNl 
THE WORLD" 



M A N U F A C T URI NG COMPANY 

SOMERSET, PA. 



200 



THE GARDEN CLUB OF TORONTO 




Compliments of The Garden Club of Toronto who en- 
thusiastically support the excellent work of The Canadian 
Rose Society. 



REG PERKINS' ROSE FARM 

QUALITY ROSE BUSHES 

To make sure that you get the very best, we bud (graft) all our Roses 
real low, on SEEDLING understock. 

Many beautiful new varieties and line old favourites to choose from. 
ORDER NOW FOR SPRING DELIVERY 

For variety and price list write to: 

REG PERKINS' ROSE FARM 

R.R. 3, Claremont, Ontario Phone 649-5301 



NEW 1967 ALL-AMERICA 

AWARD WINNING ROSES 

'Roman Holiday" 

A new brilliant orange-red, fully double blooms with up to 25 to 
30 petals to each 2V2 to 3" bloom. An unusual Floribunda with a 
bright glowing color. 
'Gay Princess" 
A lovely soft shell-pink flower of such large size for a Floribunda. 
A very pretty addition to your garden this year! 

'Bewitched" 

A clear phlox-pink Hybrid Tea as smartly elegant and freshly 
bright as it is new. Bud opens slowly to a large 5" bloom of rich 
fragrance. A superb offspring of the renowned "Queen Elizabeth". 



DOWNTOWN 



201 





A CHOICE OF GARDENING BOOKS TO DELIGHT 
GARDENERS OF ALL KINDS 

RHODODENDRONS AND AZALEAS 

Judith Berrisford Price $9.50 

AN ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF ANNUAL AND 
BIENNIAL GARDEN PLANTS 

C. O. Booth Price $18.95 

THE ROCHFORD BOOK OF FLOWERING POT PLANTS 

Thomas Rochford and Richard Gorer 
The emphasis in this book is on spectular, colourful and scented flowers for 
the house, grown with or without heat. In clear non-technical language all 
the essential cultural information given to enable everyone to get the greatest 
enjoyment from their plants. 

Price $6.75 

ROSE GROWING COMPLETE 

E. B. he Grice Price $9.50 

THE COMPLETE FLOWER GROWER 

W. E. Shewell-Cooper Price $6.75 

PELARGONIUMS 

Henry J. Wood 

A complete guide to their cultivation. 31 illustrations in full colour and line 
illustrations as well. 

Price $8.15 

GARDEN DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION 

George E. Whitehead 

Price $9.50 

All the designs and sketches in this book are based upon actual gardens 
evolved by the author and his staff who have been engaged in this work for 
many years. Photographs and line illustrations. 

PRUNING APPLE TREES 

C. R. Thompson 
For a wide range of conditions, this book sets out the reasons for keeping or 
removing shoots and branches, etc. For the care of few or many trees. 34 
monochrome half-tone illustrations and 66 line drawings. 

Price $9.50 

MUSHROOM GROWING TODAY 

Fred C. Atkins 
A new revised edition of this famous book. 

Price $6.75 

FOR LOVE OF A ROSE 

Antonia Ridge 

The beautiful story of the development of the famous Peace Rose. This book 
has become a bestseller. 

Price $4.74 

QUEENSWOOD HOUSE LIMITED 

1 7 PRINCE ARTHUR AVENUE TORONTO 5 



202 



ONTARIO GROWN 

Roses, Shrubs, Trees, Evergreens 



FROM 



SOLTY GARDEN CENTRE 



3850 KINGSTON ROAD 



SCARBOROUGH 



Phone 267-8294 

ALL NURSERY STOCK IS 100% GUARANTEED FOR ONE GROWING SEASON. 



MODERN ROSE NURSERY 

BERT WIEBICKE 
ROSE SPECIALIST 

GROWER OF QUALITY ROSES 

European Novelties 

1727 Altona Rd. Phone 282-8753 P.O. 

Rouge Hills Pickering, Ont. 



SO-GREEN 

All Purpose Fertilizer 
7-7-7 

Research at University of Louisiana indicated Roses should have 
a balanced formula fertilizer of 1-1-1 or multiples thereof. 



Dr. R. W. Oliver's article "Roses and Soil 
Fertility" recommends a fertilizer with 
balanced Ratio of 7-7-7. 

Granular, odourless, dustless So-Green 
is available in 5, 20, 40, and 80 lb. bags 
at Garden Centres, Hardware and 
Department Stores. 




203 



A PERSONAL 
MESSAGE 
FROM 

SPENCER McCONNELL 

Port Burwell, Ont. 

Dear Friends: 

The Centennial 1967 issue of our Garden Catalogue is now off the press. As 
explained below, it is Free for the asking. 100 pages of living color and definitely 
the best we have put out to date. This is a must for any rosarian, particularly during 
our Centennial year. 

For 1967, the All-America Winners are excellent. Bewitched, Lucky Lady, Roman 
Holiday and Gay Princess are all listed in our catalogue. Of course,, we all have a 
winner in our own Miss Canada, the front' cover subject of this year's book. 

Some other notables for 1967 are: Sincera, American Heritage, Matterhorn, Rose 
Gau\ard, Columbus Queen, Josephine Bruce, Swarthmore, Garden State, Circus 
Parade and our Miss Canada, Tree Rose. 

In connection with Centennial, we have a fine stock of the Canada Centennial 
Tree, (Malus Almey) Red Almey Flowering Crab. This, is an excellent tree, hardy all 
over Canada and worthy to be chosen for this special event. 

I cannot close this letter without thanking you all for your patronage over the 
year. I will continue to serve the Canadian Rose Society and this company will ever 
strive to deserve your continued confidence. 

Sincerely yours, 

S. McConnell, 

Chairman of the Board, 

The McConnell Nursery Co. Ltd. 




Spencer D. McConnell 



p spk mm mm g 100 - page all -color garden catalogue. 
Ih nr nil in I bigger and better than ever before — 
■ mm mm • TH e newest and best roses 



THE McCONNELL NURSERY CO. LTD. 

85 NOVA SCOTIA' STREET PORT BURWELL, ONT. 

PHONE 874-4405 ESTABLISHED 1912 



204 



BROOKDALE - KINGSWAY 

"FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE" 

PERENNIALS EVERGREENS 
HEDGING TREES 
VINES ROSES SHRUBS 

If you have not received a copy of our latest 1966-67 bi-annual Gardening 
Guide catalogue, we shall be pleased to send one on request. 

Phone or Write 

BROOKDALE-KINGSWAY NURSERIES 

BOWMANVILLE, ONTARIO 
Bowmanville 623-3345 Toronto 366-2566 



CHEZ PERRON TOUT EST BON 



"WE LEAD IN PLANTS AND SEEDS" 

Our 1967 Garden Guide, 96 pages, abundantly illustrated, 
price 50c, refundable when purchasing for $3.00 or more. 

We publish 2 editions, one in French and one in English. 

We are distributors in Eastern Canada for Ra-Pid-Gro (23-19-17), 
plus all minor elements and vitamins Bi and Bs, known as the 
miracle plant food. 

W. H. PERRON & CO. LIMITED 

SEEDSMEN & NURSERYMEN 
515 LABELLE BOULEVARD, CHOMEDEY, P.Q., CANADA 

(Owners of Dupuy & Ferguson Ltd.) 



205 




PHALTAN 

ROSE & GARDEN FUNGICIDE 



The answer to the rose lovers 7 prayer for the control of Black 
Spot, Rose Mildew and Rust, those three villains that cause 
the leaves to curl, shrivel, dry up and fall off. 

Known technically as PHALTAN, Rose & Garden Fungicide 
has been hailed by rosarians and hobbyists as the finest rose 
disease control yet developed. Rose & Garden Fungicide is 
a concentrate material (75% PHALTAN) designed to be 
mixed with water and applied as a spray. Wetting and stick- 
ing agents are properly blended into the product. 



Look for Rose & Garden Fungicide and the other fine ORTHO 
garden and home products at garden, hardware and depart- 
ment stores. 



CHEVRON CHEMICAL (CANADA) LIMITED 




ROSE & GARDE* 



A preventative spray program with Rose & 
Garden Fungicide started in the Spring will help 
assure a full luxuriant foliage and disease free 
plants all Summer. 




PHALTAN is also formulated into ORTHO Rose 
Dust and ORTHO Rose & Flower Bomb. 



ORTHO DIVISION 



OAKVILLE, ONTARIO 



Reg. T. M. PHALTAN, ORTHO 



206 



EDDIE'S ROSES 



Send for our beautifully illus- 
trated catalogue. 

Arthur Bell, Baby Sylvia, Bali- 
nese, Blue Moon, Bobbie Lucas, 
City of Leeds, Early Bird, Big 
Red, Galway Bay, Ice Water, 
Irish Mist, Lady Seton, Park 
Royal, Reg Williams, Royal 
Canadian, and latest All Ameri- 
ca Winners. 



LEADING IN ROSES FOR 40 YEARS 

EDDIE'S NURSERIES 

4100 S.W. MARINE DR. VANCOUVER 13, B.C. 




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GARDEN TOOLS 




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ASK YOUR GARDEN TOOL DEALER" 




The Easy Pleasant Way 
To Enjoy 
Beautiful 
Roses ! 

Thousands of expert Rose 
growers depend on regular 
applications of RA-PID- 
GRO to keep their plants 
vigorous and covered with 
excellent bloom. 

Feed and Spray In One Operation 

You are applying insecticides and fungicides to your Roses. 
Such pest control sprays are an essential requirement of any 
good Rose care. Simply add RA-PID-GRO to your pest con- 
trol solution at the rate of one teaspoon RA-PID-GRO in 
each quart. Stir thoroughly and spray the Roses in the regular 
way. You can control insects and diseases, feed quickly and 
efficiently through the foliage all in the same application. This 
is less work, less bother, and gives you better results than any 
other method we know. 



The Instantl y Soluble 
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The pioneer in foliar feeding; origina- 
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Phosphoric Acid 21%, Potash 17% 
plus trace elements and hormones. 



ORIGINAL & GENUINE 




208 



How many weedkillers 
would you dare spray 
like this? 



One. 




NEW WEEDRITE 

kills weeds and unwanted grass 



... up to the base of established 
trees, hedges and shrubs. New 
'Weedrite' Weedkiller with 
diquat and paraquat kills only 
what's green ; it can't harm 
mature brown bark and it 
becomes completely inactivated 
on contact with soil. Fast-acting, 
it is absolutely non-volatile; 
can be safely used as directed 



close to desireable plants and 
between rows of flowers or 
vegetables. 

'Weedrite' is also an ideal weed 
treatment for driveways, walks, 
patios, ditches and fences. 
Available in 7 oz. poly bottles 
(to treat approximately 800 
sq. ft.) at your Chip man 
Garden Chemical dealers now. 



J^j WEEDRITE 

^^^^^^ CHIPMAN CHEMICALS LIMITED, MONTREAL, HAMILTON, WINNIPEG 



WILKINSON 




First choice in quality primers 



Every gardening enthusiast recognizes the quality and crafts- 
manship that make Wilkinson Sword Pruners first choice every- 
where. 

New modern design . . . exclusive floating bearings and un- 
excelled cutting blades are features you'll find make these tools 
more comfortable and efficient to use than any others. 



Stocked and sold 
by better stores 
everywhere. 




rhJOHN A. HUSTON CO. LTD. 



36 Caledonia Rd. Toronto 10, Ontario 



210 



COMPLETE ROSE 
PROTECTION AND FEEDING 

with 

PROTEXALL SPRAY or PROTEXALL DUST 
PLANT ROTARY DUSTER 
PLANT PROD 20-20-20 INSTANT PLANT 
FOOD 

SKOOT — REPELLENT FOR RABBITS MICE 

AND DEER 
ACTO Q.R. CONCENTRATE HERBAL 
COMPOST MAKER 

PROTEXALL SPRAY or PROTEXALL DUST 

A powerful combination of insecticides and fungicides that will protect roses 
and other flowers and shrubs from most insects and diseases such as aphids, 
mites, rose chaffers and others, as well as black spot and mildew. 




PLANT ROTARY DUSTER 

This light weight aluminum rotary duster 
throws an eight foot stream of dust in an 
ever continuous flow. Dusts 200 bushes 
with one filling of PROTEXALL DUST. 




m 



PLANT PROD 20-20-20 
INSTANT PLANT FOOD 

Special rose fertilizer and all around plant 
food for flowers, vegetables, shrubs, trees, lawns, house plants and transplanting 
— and so easy to apply. This is a new type of instantly-soluble plant food 
that feeds through the leaves, as well as the roots. It goes to work instantly 
it touches the foliage and will not harm even the tender growth. 

SKOOT — REPELLENT FOR 
RABBITS MICE AND DEER 

Protects dormant ornamentals, shrubs, nursery 
stock and young fruit trees. SKOOT is a formula 
developed after years of research — protects 
plants for one full season — harmless to pets 
— repels by taste. Can be sprayed or painted on. 

ACTO Q.R. CONCENTRATE 
COMPOST MAKER 

The British herbal compost maker that helps pro- 
duce the wonderful compost which roses thrive on. 



SKOOT 

REPELIHT FOR RABBITS 
MICE BEER 




Plant Products 
Company Limited 0 



70 WESLEY AVE., 
PORT CREDIT, ONT. 




211 



w, 

Acti-dione PM 



Weekly spray applications of Acti-dione PM 
throughout spring and summer help protect 
your prized roses from this killing disease. 
This antibiotic-fungicide will bring mildew 
under control even when the disease is well 
advanced. 

Easy to apply with hand or power sprayer, 
Acti-dione PM leaves no unsightly residue to 
mar your roses' beauty. 

For further information on lawn and garden 
care, write to : 

A. H. Howard Chemical 

Company Ltd. 

Orangeville 

Ontario 

COPYRIGHT. 1962. THE UPJOHN COMPANY 



212 



COCOA 
BEAN SHELLS 

THE FINEST MULCH AND 
ORGANIC SUPPLEMENT FOR ROSES 

isSf t& to> is? 

ONTARIO ROSE FANCIERS 

You can now obtain specialty rose products . . . 
COCOA-BEAN SHELLS 
DUSTS, SPRAYS AND FERTILIZERS 
ESPECIALLY FOR ROSES 

and 

GOOD CANADIAN GROWN ROSES 
at 

FRANK EWALD'S HIGHWAY NURSERIES 

R.R. I (Gait-Hamilton Highway) Branchton j 

MORI'S NURSERY 
R.R. 2 Niagara-on-the-Lake 

ROBERT NIELSEN NURSERIES | 
2667 Lakeshore Hwy. E. Oakville 

PINEHAVEN NURSERIES 
475 Upper Middle Rd. Cooksville 

YORK NURSERIES 
R.R. 4 (Stratford Highway) Kitchener 



213 



SHERIDAN 

NURSERIES 
LIMITED 

▲ 

1867 1 1967 

CONFEDERATION 

GROWING WITH CANADA 
FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS 




CANADA'S FINEST AND WIDEST 
SELECTION OF QUALITY ORNAMENTAL 
NURSERY STOCK. FOUR MODERN 
SALES STATIONS IN METRO TORONTO 
AND ONE IN MONTREAL TO SERVE 
YOU WELL. 
HEAD OFFICE: 
100 SHERWAY DRIVE, 
ETOBICOKE, ONTARIO. 

214 



From Hitchin, England, come HARKNESS ROSES, with a 
worldwide reputation for quality; and that means long life! 
The reason? Our chalky Hitchin soil makes strong, search- 
ing roots; the dry climate and exposed site make hard, ripe 
wood. 

Harkness Roses are hardy — and we mean hardy for 
Canadian conditions. 

Send for a free Catalogue, giving the greatest selection 
of varieties offered anywhere — and including the KING 
ARTHUR range of new Harkness raised Roses. 

Plant Harkness Roses in Spring. Send for free Catalogue 
now. 

R. Harkness & Co. Ltd. 

THE ROSE GARDENS 
HITCHIN - HERTS - ENGLAND 




See our display of ever- 
blooming roses this sum- 
mer. We will have again 
over 100,000 of them in 270 
old and new varieties bloom- 
ing in our rose fields and 
rose garden. 

Send for our complete list. 



V. KRAUS NURSERIES 

C ARLISLE, ONT. 

16 miles north of Hamilton 
growers of the best since 1920 



Phone 

689-4022 

Area Code 
416 



215 



Ills 

saves? 

tiiais? 



birch leaf miner 
other insects 
aphids 

what saw 



mm 1st 



CYGON 2-E 

One simple "brush-on" application of Cygon 2-E completely pro- 
tects your birch trees and roses for 8 weeks against leaf miner, 
aphids, leafhoppers, mites and thrips. Simply paint a 6-inch band 
of Cygon 2-E directly from the bottle around the trunk or basal 
stem early in the growing season (a special applicator is inside 
each bottle). The systemic action of Cygon 2-E penetrates the 
entire system, instantly kills insects. You can also spray most orna- 
mentals for control of a wide range of insects with 1 teaspoon of 
Cygon 2-E per half gallon of water. 

Get Cygon 2-E at your drug, hardware or garden supply centre. 
And remember: Cygon 2-E comes from Cyanamid. 



®TM Reg'd 



Always follow the 
label instructions 
carefully when using 
any pesticide. 



Cyanamid of Canada Ltd., Montreal 2, Que. 




Protect your roses 
AFTER PRUNING 
with Garden Joy 
PRUNING COMPOUND 



Here's complete and dependable pro- 
tection for your rose bushes after 
pruning. When applied to the newly 
cut canes, this specially formulated 
pruning compound forms a thin 
elastic coating that cannot be pene- 
trated by insects or diseases. Pre- 
vents die-back, bleeding and rose 
borers — is not washed away by rain 
— does not crack after drying — 
quick and easy to apply — harmless 
to hands and clothing. Don't take 
chances with your prized rose 
bushes. Order Garden Joy Pruning 
Compound now. 

Only $1.19 postpaid 

(A whole year's supply for the 
average gardener) 

Special Offer to Societies in case lots 
of 12 cans. 

The McConnell Nursery Co. Ltd. 
Port Burwell, Ontario 



Our Aim 

CANADIAN ROSES 

FOR CANADIAN GARDENS 



JOHN CONNON 
NURSERIES 

LTD. 
Box 200, 
WATERDOWN— ONTARIO 



Growers of Quality Roses 
Evergreens, Trees, Shrubs 
Hedging, Perennials 

Catalogue mailed on request 



D I X O N - R E I D 
PLANT FOOD 



Over a Million Sold C 

Makes the 

amateur 

gardener 
an expert! 
• Used 
indoors and 
outdoors by 
gardeners — 
for soil 
treatment, 
transplant- 
ing, nurse- 
ries, cut 
flowers, 
lawns, trees 
and shrubs. 

Available in 
29c, 50c, 
$land$h79 
bottles. 

At Florists, Department, Hardware, 
Grocery, Drug, and 5 and 10c Stores 
throughout Canada. 



IMPROVED FERTILIZER 
FOR TRANSPLANTING 



\>IXON-REID CO. LTD., TORONTO 




GUARANTEED 



If 



UWHE (MID- 

or yoc/r money back! 

Let you — and your roses— be 
the judge! Watch Gardal go to 
work on insects, black spot, 
mites and mildew. And if it 
isn't the best rose spray you've 
ever used, tell us so. Write to 
Green Cross Products, P.O. 
Box 489, Montreal. Send us the 
bottle with label, and we'll send 
you your money back. 

Applied as a liquid spray, 
Gardal leaves no visible pow- 
der or dust deposits. Its sys- 
temic insecticide and systemic 
fungicide go right inside the 
plant. The systemic insecticide 
distributes itself throughout 
the entire plant, protecting ten- 
der new growth from insect 
damage for up to two weeks 
after application. Systemics 
cannot be washed off by rain, 
since they are within the plant. 





WHATEVER THE WEED, WHATEVER THE PEST 
WHAT YOU REALLY NEED IS GREEN CROSS! 



ITS CANADIAN — 
IT'S QUALITY 

Division of *T. M. Reg'd. 

THE SHERWIN-WILLIAMS CO. 
OF CANADA LIMITED 




PRODUCTS 



Miss Canada Rose 
by RIDGWAY 

The magnificent hybrid tea rose chosen to honour our nation's centennial 
has also been selected as the motif for a centenary pattern in Royal 
Adderley English Bone China. 

The beauty of this exclusive floral pattern is set off to perfection by the 
lustrous translucence of this exquisite tableware. Royal Adderley's Miss 
Canada Rose is available in tea and dinner sets, as well as in charming 
brooch and earring ensembles, attractively boxed for gift-giving. 

For your free copy of a booklet on the romance of English tableware, 
write today to : 

RIDGWAY POTTERIES CANADA LTD. 
8 KING STREET EAST, TORONTO 1 

Royal4dderley 

A PRODUCT OF RIDGWAY POTTERIES LIMITED, 
ASH HALL, STOKE-ON-TRENT, ENGLAND. 




220 



Compliments of 

CANADA'S LARGEST ROSE GROWERS 



Our 25 years of rose growing 
experience is at your service 



Please do nof hesitate to ask 
for free Catalogue 



Ellesmere Nurseries Ltd. 



R.R.1, BROOKLIN, ONT. 



TEL. 655-3661 



Surest way to protect 

ROSE BEAUTY! 



WILSON'S SYSTEMIC INSECTICIDES 

give the utmost in ROSE protection. 
Because they are absorbed into the 
plant's sap stream, they, make the 
ROSE BUSH itself lethal to destructive 
insects. Weeks of protection with 
one application. Rain can't wash off. 
No unsightly residues. Not affected 
by temperature. Easy to apply and 
economical to use. 



WILSON'S 

Systemic Insecticides 




221 



Acclimatized 
CANADIAN GROWN ROSES 

Growers of over 250 varieties of roses, including the best 
of the newest varieties, and many of the old fine varieties 
not found in all catalogues. 

Rosa canina and Rosa multiflora 
understocks 

For price and variety list write to 

CARL PALLEK & SON NURSERIES 

Box 137, Virgil, Ont. (Near St. Catharines) 




AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING 
NURSERIES and HARDWARE STORES 



222 



THE 

CANADA NURSERY TRADES 
ASSOCIATION 

AND 

THE CANADIAN ROSE SOCIETY 

jointly endorse the beautiful 

For the 1967 Centennial Celebrations 

Why not plant a special flower, shrub or tree 
as part of your contribution to this epic year? 

What more significant and worthwhile gesture 
could you make to mark the growth of our 
country? 

Contact your local Nurseryman or 
Garden Centre 
TODAY! 

They will be glad to help you and your family 
plan a planting programme for your garden. 



LOOK FOR THE ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP 
INSIGNIA — IT STANDS FOR QUALITY AND 
SERVICE. 




223 



ROSES - PLANTS - FERTILIZERS 
And all Garden Supplies 

ENDEAN NURSERIES 

RICHMOND HILL, ONTARIO 
Yonge St. N. Thornhill 689-5122 



FINE WALL CLEANING, 
PAINTING & DECORATING 

SINCE 1907 

A. TEOLIS LIMITED 

188 LAIRD DR., TORONTO 17 421-4377 



there are roses . . . 

. . . and Roses 

Check the quality of Unionville's 
Ontario-grown Roses before you buy 

UNIONVILLE NURSERIES LTD. 

#7 HIGHWAY, UNIONVILLE 297-1440 



224 



PINEHAVEN NURSERIES 

475 Upper Middle Road, Cooksville, Ontario 

Rose Fanciers you will be happy to know that we have completed our 
arrangements with Sam McGredy for introducing and growing all McGredy 
and Poulsen roses under license. In future, those wonderful European 
varieties will be grown by us and other Canadian nurseries that we license 
so that the Canadian public can get for the first time in our history all 
the good European introductions grown in Canada. 

This spring the newer European varieties that we offer are mostly grown in 
Ireland with a few having been grown here but by next fall they will all 
have been grown by ourselves. May we thank those ardent members of 
the Canadian Rose Society who encouraged this new venture. 
Hybrid Teas: Bond Street (McGredy '66) — a fine deep pink 

Casanova (McGredy '65) — a strong healthy yellow 
Colour Wonder (Kordes '64) — orange-salmon and yellow 
Kronenbourg (McGredy '66) — a flaming sport of 'Peace' 
Lady Seton (McGredy '67) — tall, free flowering pink 
Piccadilly (McGredy '61) — scarlet-yellow bicolour 
Red Lion (McGredy '67) — large bright red show rose 
Reg. Willis (McGredy '67) — an outstanding red 
Shannon (McGredy '66) — rich rose pink show rose 
Silver Star (Kordes '66) — a lavender beauty 
Floribundas: 

Arthur Bell (McGredy '66) — bright yellow 
City of Leeds (McGredy '67) — a red Gold 

Medal winner 
Ice White (McGredy '67) — fully double 

snow-white 
Jan Spek (McGredy '67) — yellow 

'Rose of the Year' 
John Church (McGredy '65) — an orange 
beauty 

Marie Elizabeth (McGredy '66) — 

an outstanding multicolour 
Marlena (Kordes '64) — deep red 
Pernille Poulsen (Poulsen '66) — 

bright coral 
Rose of Tralee (McGredy '65) — 

warm pink 
Climbers: 

Galway Bay (McGredy '67) — 

rose pink 
Handel (McGredy '66) — ivory and 

rose bicolour 
Schoolgirl (McGredy '65) — 

soft apricot orange 
Sympathie (Kordes '67) — 
velvety red 




Free colour catalogue available upon request listing the above 
and many other roses. Most of the new ones and many of 
the old. 



225 



Canadian grown roses — exclusive new varieties 

Rose field open for visitors from July 1 to October 1, located on Woodbine 
Ave., South of No 7 Highway North of Steeles Ave. 

Free Catalogue on request 

White Rose Nurseries Ltd. 

UNIONVILLE, ONTARIO 




patronize 
your 

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226